Big 12 Forcing Texas Star Breckyn Hager To Apologize For Saying “OU Sucks”

first_imgSam Ehlinger in the pocket for Texas.DALLAS, TX – OCTOBER 06: Sam Ehlinger #11 of the Texas Longhorns looks for an open receiver against the Oklahoma Sooners in the first half of the 2018 AT&T Red River Showdown at Cotton Bowl on October 6, 2018 in Dallas, Texas. (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)After his team’s win over Iowa State, Texas defensive lineman Breckyn Hager gave a colorful interview, which included a shot at Oklahoma’s defense. He also threw in an “OU sucks” for good measure.Well, it doesn’t look like the Big 12 is thrilled about it. Monday, the conference issued a statement on Hager’s comments, asking him to apologize for them.The Big 12 says he’ll be “expected” to apologize. We have no idea if that means he’ll follow through.I told Breckyn Hager that kansas scored 40 on Oklahoma. “But OU has no defense” he responded.He then looked at the clock. “And what time is it? It’s 11:12 … and OU still sucks.”See? Rivalries can still be fun. pic.twitter.com/4NbWoXkjHj— Bob Ballou (@BobBallouSports) November 18, 2018Here’s the Big 12’s statement:“Breckyn Hager violated the Conference rule that prohibits coaches, student-athletes, athletic department staff and university personnel from making negative comments about other member institutions for his remarks about the University of Oklahoma,” said Bowlsby.  “This is Mr. Hager’s second violation of the Conference sportsmanship rules and therefore, he is receiving a public reprimand and will be expected to issue a public apology for his inappropriate comments.”If Texas beats Kansas and Oklahoma beats West Virginia, the two will meet again in the Big 12 title game. The war of words may have already begun.last_img read more

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Country’s No. 2 Recruit Announces Commitment

first_imgA generic view of a goal line marker.(Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)The nation’s No. 2 recruit just announced his commitment. Five-star defensive end Kayvon Thibodeaux was expected to be deciding between Oregon and Alabama and he did just that on Saturday afternoon.The five-star recruit held down the No. 1 spot for the majority of the year before fellow five-star defensive end Nolan Smith took over later. Florida State was the early leader in the clubhouse to land Thibodeaux, though his recruitment shifted several times over the course of the year.Oregon entered as the favorite to land the top recruit this week, but Alabama made a late charge. So, which program landed the top recruit?Thibodeaux revealed his commitment on ESPN – during his birthday no less:Kayvon Thibodeaux picks Oregon over Alabama. Mario Cristobal with a big recruiting win.— Andrew Bone (@AndrewJBone) December 15, 2018The star defensive end is a huge get for Mario Cristobal – a former Nick Saban assistant. Oregon was already inside the top 10 in terms of its 2019 recruiting class, but the addition of Thibodeaux will have the Ducks rocketing up the ranks.last_img read more

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Mallya to appeal against extradition order

first_imgLondon: Embattled liquor tycoon Vijay Mallya’s extradition case will return to the UK courts on Tuesday as he seeks permission to appeal against an order signed off by UK home secretary Sajid Javid for him to be extradited to India to face alleged fraud and money laundering charges amounting to Rs 9,000 crores. The 63-year-old former Kingfisher Airlines boss has already lost a UK High Court “leave to appeal” on paper, leading to an oral hearing of his renewal application this week. A two-judge bench of the Administrative Court division of the Royal Courts of Justice in London will hear the application, filed in April. During the day-long hearing, listed before Justices George Leggatt and Andrew Popplewell, Mallya’s legal team and the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) arguing on behalf of the Indian government will go head to head to reiterate factors for and against the businessman’s extradition to Arthur Road Jail in Mumbai. The judges are likely to reserve their judgment in the case and hand down their ruling in the coming weeks. In the scenario that Mallya is unsuccessful in his appeal, he must be extradited within 28 days from the appeal decision becoming final. However, if he is granted permission to appeal, the case will then proceed to a full hearing stage at the UK High Court. The appeal will mark one of the final stages of the appeals process, as the chances of permission to appeal to the Supreme Court are unlikely if such a permission is already denied at the High Court stage. “It is not for me to prejudge the outcome of the appeal, but he (Mallya) does face serious challenges in overturning the order for extradition,” said Toby Cadman, co-founder of Guernica 37 International Justice Chambers.last_img read more

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Meilleur pulls out of languages job cites controversy around nomination

first_imgOTTAWA – The Liberals’ contentious choice for official languages commissioner has withdrawn her candidacy, saying her nomination has become a “controversy.”In a letter addressed to the heritage minister, Madeleine Meilleur said she didn’t think she would be able to do the job properly given the uproar since her name was put forth by the government.“As you know, my nomination has become the subject of controversy,” she told Melanie Joly in the letter dated Tuesday. “Considering this situation, I have concluded that my capacity to fully assume my functions and to act on behalf of Canadians would be greatly compromised.”The letter came after steadfast Opposition criticism of Meilleur’s possible appointment because of her ties to the federal Liberals.It also came after her appearance on Monday night in front of a Senate committee where she admitted having discussed “in passing” her interest for the job with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s two closest advisers.Meilleur’s comments left many senators speechless and increased speculation the upper chamber would reject her nomination.During testimony in May in front of the Commons official languages committee, Meilleur had made similar comments about her discussions with Trudeau’s advisersJoly wouldn’t say Wednesday whether Meilleur’s Senate appearance influenced her decision to withdraw.“Mrs. Meilleur took her decision,” Joly said. “She has been, and is, an important advocate in favour of linguistic rights in this country and I really hope that she’ll continue to do this important work.”Meilleur was a Liberal member of the Ontario legislature between 2003 and 2016.The federal Liberals insisted her selection was based on merit, experience and a track record of defending francophone rights.But New Democrats and Conservatives accused Trudeau of picking her for the job without consulting them.The Conservatives called her withdrawal from contention “good news” as they accused the prime minister of “embarrassing himself” and lacking judgment.Tory MPs repeatedly asked Trudeau during question period if the nomination process would be reformed.Trudeau, who took questions from MPs, as is his custom on Wednesdays, did not provide direct answers.Graham Fraser was the previous official languages commissioner.last_img read more

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Ontarios challenge of carbonpricing law wraps up judges reserve decision

first_imgTORONTO — Ontario’s constitutional challenge to Ottawa’s imposition of a carbon charge was left in the hands of five Appeal Court justices on Thursday after the hearing wrapped up with each side pressing the court to find in its favour.In closing submissions, a federal lawyer warned that climate change posed an urgent threat. Ottawa, she said, has addressed an issue of national concern in a manner that respects provincial jurisdiction.Ontario, however, stood by its view that the Greenhouse Gas Pollution Pricing Act  — if deemed constitutional — would undermine co-operative federalism by allowing Ottawa to overstep the dividing line between federal and provincial spheres of authority.“It governs a broad range of activities that are in provincial jurisdiction,” Ontario lawyer Josh Hunter said Thursday in his closing comments. “It is not appropriate for a federation.”The judges, who peppered the various counsel with questions throughout the proceedings, reserved their decision.Over the course of the four-day hearing, Ontario’s highest court heard warnings about the dangers of unchecked greenhouse gas emissions. Indigenous groups, for example, stressed their vulnerability to global warming they said could destroy their way of life.Federal lawyers argued the act is a legitimate response to potentially catastrophic climate change. The act, which only applies in Ontario, New Brunswick, Manitoba and Saskatchewan — four provinces Ottawa says don’t meet national standards — imposes a levy on gasoline, other fossil fuels, and industry.The law, federal lawyer Sharlene Telles-Langdon said, would not result in an expansion of constitutional powers that would give Ottawa carte blanche to regulate issues that fall squarely within provincial jurisdiction — a claim made by Ontario and its supporters.The federal government maintains the levy in Ontario — currently four cents a litre on gasoline — is a regulatory charge designed to change behaviour in favour of lower greenhouse gas emissions. Ontario calls the charge an illegal tax — another violation of the Constitution — a position it repeated in final submissions.During the hearing, opponents of the act raised scenarios in which Ottawa could now ban wood-burning fireplaces, limit how warm or cool people could keep their homes, or when they could drive. Proponents of the law denounced those notions as “alarmist.”In all, 14 interveners — among them some provinces, Indigenous groups and environmental and business organizations — lined up to defend or attack the federal law, with most siding with Ottawa.One supporter, British Columbia, argued the act does not prevent provinces from adopting their own approaches to climate change. For its part, Saskatchewan, which is awaiting its own Appeal Court ruling on a similar challenge, maintained the Liberal government in Ottawa was using a “big stick” to force its will on four Conservative provinces for purely political reasons.While the intricate constitutional issues at play over federal and provincial division of powers and Ottawa’s ability to levy the carbon charge were fought in the legal arena, some observers said the case was as much about politics and ideology as it was about law.“Wherever there is a thorny political problem, and this is very much one in Canada, it’s common for politicians to say, ‘We should let the courts decide’,” said Simon Archer, a Toronto lawyer with expertise in environmental law. “It’s a government saying, ‘We want the court to take the heat for this problem and not us’.”It will likely take several months for the judges to rule.Colin Perkel, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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Torrey DeVitto Tips The Scales For Crocodiles

first_imgWearing nothing more than reptilian scales as she swims through a lush lake, Torrey DeVitto appears as a crocodile in a brand-new PETA campaign that asks, “Whose Skin Are You In? Choose Fake Snake and Mock Croc. Wear Vegan.”In an exclusive interview with PETA, the Pretty Little Liars and Chicago Med star explains why she’s eager to speak up for reptiles killed for their skins. “[Workers] don’t even kill them—they just hit them over the head with metal bats or stab them in the neck,” she says. “Most of the time these animals are still breathing and still living when they get their skin taken from them, and it takes about three to four alligators or crocodiles to make just one bag. It’s absolutely unnecessary.”PETA — whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to wear” — recently released an exposé revealing that reptiles were trapped in barren and severely crowded pits on farms that supply crocodile and alligator skins to Hermès-owned tanneries. Workers shot alligators in the head with a captive-bolt gun and, as DeVitto describes, sawed open the back of the animals’ necks with a box cutter to sever their blood vessels. Previous PETA exposés have revealed that snakes, alligators, and other exotic animals who are killed for their skins are commonly nailed to trees, bludgeoned with hammers, and skinned alive.last_img read more

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Aboriginal organizations hit with 60 million worth of cuts Inuit faced steepest

first_imgJorge Barrera APTN National NewsAboriginal organizations have faced $60 million worth of cuts from the Harper government over the past three years and Inuit groups were hit the hardest, according to an internal Assembly of First Nations analysis obtained by APTN National News.The analysis, which is based on federal Aboriginal Affairs department figures as of Jan. 7 of this year, found Inuit organizations faced a cut of 71 per cent between 2012 and 2015. First Nations organizations absorbed 65.5 per cent worth of cuts over the same time span. Metis organizations saw cuts of 39 per cent, non-status Indian organizations 14 per cent and women’s organizations were hit with a 7 per cent cut, the analysis found.Overall, Aboriginal organizations across the country have lost about $60 million dollars in core and project funding, signifying a 59 per cent reduction between 2012 and 2015, according to the analysis.First Nations organizations, in particular, saw their overall funding, including core and project based funding, drop from $68.8 million in 2012-2013 to $23.8 million in 2014-2015, which amounts to an about 65 per cent cut.AnalysisDownload (PDF, Unknown)First Nation organizations in Ontario have seen the biggest overall cut to funding. In the 2011-2012 fiscal year, Ontario First Nation organizations received a little over $20 million in project and core funding. In the 2014-2015 year, the five Ontario organizations saw that total reduced to about $5 million, which amounts to a 76 per cent cut, according to the analysis.According to the analysis, two organizations in New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island have been hit by an 80 per cent cut, in Saskatchewan, the sole regional organization, the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations, has faced a 91 per cent cut, while in Manitoba, three regional First Nation organizations, Southern Chiefs, Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimankanak and Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs, have been hit with a 78 per cent funding cut between 2012 and 2015.In British Columbia, three First Nations organizations there, the B.C. First Nation Summit, Union of BC Indian Chiefs and the BC AFN have faced a 73 per cent cut. The summit has taken the biggest hit with an 82 per cent reduction.Tribal Councils, which are different than regional organizations and represent smaller groups of First nation communities, have also seen their core funding drop from about $49 million in 2011-2012 to $29.8 million between 2011-2012 to 2014-2015, which represents an about 40 per cent funding cut.The cuts, which are starting to bite now, were initially announced by former Aboriginal affairs minister John Duncan in 2012. At the time he said Ottawa would be changing the “funding model” for Aboriginal organizations and tribal council, shifting to a focus on areas that matched the department’s priorities.jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

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Saskatchewan murder suspect Gerald Stanley granted bail

first_imgThe Canadian PressBATTLEFORD, Sask. — A judge has granted bail to a Saskatchewan farmer charged with the shooting death of an aboriginal man on his property.The decision, which was released as the court was closing Friday in Battleford, said Gerald Stanley is to be freed on $10,000 bail.Court of Queen’s Bench Justice Neil Gabrielson imposed several conditions, including that the 54-year-old Stanley remain within a six-kilometre radius of his farm and wear an electronic monitoring bracelet. He must also stay away from the Red Pheasant First Nation and have no contact with the family of the man who was killed.Stanley is charged with second-degree murder in the death of 22-year-old Colten Boushie of the Red Pheasant reserve.Download (PDF, Unknown)Stanley pleaded not guilty to the charge during a court appearance on Thursday. A bail hearing was held later in the day but a publication ban was placed on the details.Boushie was killed Aug. 9 after the vehicle he was in drove onto the farm in the rural municipality of Glenside, west of Saskatoon.Boushie’s cousin has said they were heading home to the reserve after an afternoon of swimming, when they got a flat tire and were looking for help.Racial tensions flared after the killing.See related stories about Colten Boushie. First Nations leaders said an initial RCMP release about the shooting was biased, because it stated that people in the car were taken into custody as part of a theft investigation. They were released without charges.Some comments on social media sites have also been anti-First Nation, while others have supported vigilante justice against the suspect. Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall took to Facebook last weekend to condemn the comments and called on people to “rise above intolerance.”Hundreds of supporters for Boushie attended court Thursday. Some yelled at Stanley as he was led away by RCMP.Sheldon Wuttunee, a spokesman for the Boushie family, called for calm. He said its important to demand justice, but in a peaceful manner.Stanley’s family also released a statement through his lawyer Thursday, saying there has been rampant speculation and misinformation about the shooting. They said they hope people will reserve judgement until the facts of the case are known.last_img read more

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Gap Fiscal 3Q Earnings Snapshot

first_imgSAN FRANCISCO (AP) _ Gap Inc. (GPS) on Tuesday reported fiscal third-quarter net income of $266 million.The San Francisco-based company said it had net income of 69 cents per share.The results surpassed Wall Street expectations. The average estimate of 10 analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research was for earnings of 68 cents per share.The clothing chain posted revenue of $4.09 billion in the period, also topping Street forecasts. Eight analysts surveyed by Zacks expected $3.98 billion.Gap expects full-year earnings to be $2.55 to $2.60 per share.Gap shares have dropped 28 per cent since the beginning of the year, while the Standard & Poor’s 500 index has decreased 1 per cent. In the final minutes of trading on Tuesday, shares hit $24.66, a decline of 18 per cent in the last 12 months._____This story was generated by Automated Insights (http://automatedinsights.com/ap) using data from Zacks Investment Research. Access a Zacks stock report on GPS at https://www.zacks.com/ap/GPSThe Associated Presslast_img read more

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OSU mens soccer defends Wolstein Classic title in overtime

Ohio State men’s soccer’s first win of the 2012 season was doubly important – it also clinched its second consecutive Wolstein Classic championship.OSU (1-2-1) captured its first win against Davidson, 3-2, on Sunday in an overtime victory in the Bert and Iris Wolstein Classic at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. The Buckeyes drew with Coastal Carolina, 1-1, Friday to stay in the running for their second consecutive tournament title. The Buckeyes, also tournament hosts, rallied from 2-0 deficit to capture the tournament.“It’s awesome. It’s such a relief for us because we have been so close for so long,” said senior midfielder Austin McAnena. “I mean every single game we have been pretty unlucky at the end of games, and that last goal we got lucky and I think that can really turn our season around.”OSU coach John Bluem wasn’t too happy with how his team started in the beginning of the game, but was proud of the way his team finished.“It feels great. I thought we would already have won one by now,” Bluem said. “We lost some games we thought we could have won. Today was a game we thought we could win, and then we put ourselves in a really deep hole. Really proud of our players that they hung in there and got the win today.”With the Buckeyes down, 2-0, in the second half, things went from bad to worse, as sophomore midfielder Yianni Sarris was hit with a red card early in the period, and forced the Buckeyes to play with only 10 players on the field. Instead of the man-down scenario setting OSU back even more, it spurred the Buckeyes to a revival.“We all kind of looked at each other,” sophomore forward Kenny Cunningham said. “Let’s get it together; this is a turning point of our season. If we get this together, the whole season turns around.”Shortly after the red card, senior midfielder Sebastian Rivas scored the first goal for the Buckeye. Then freshman defender Alex Bujenovic tied the game up 2-2 with a free kick that forced overtime.In the 97th minute, Cunningham put Davidson away for good with a powerful, game winning shot.If the game had two different stories of the intensity level for the Buckeyes, McAnena said the penalty on Sarris ignited the team and brought them together.“I think it was just the intensity,” McAnena said. “We were a man down, and we really needed to pick it up. It was kind of our last stand, and when we were down 2-0, with Sarris on the bench, we just had to start attacking.”After the game, Bluem pointed out the issues with his team early in the season, but said he felt the team came together at the right time on Sunday.“I think one of the issues with the team through the first four games have been a little bit of selfishness,” Bluem said. “They got to start looking for each other rather than thinking about themselves, and I think they did that when we were a man down. They collectively came together and played harder for each other, so that is a good step.”As the team prepares for San Diego on Friday, there are other areas Bluem wants to correct within the team.“I think we need to be better defensively,” Bluem said. “We have allowed too many goals. Our goalkeeper has made some mistakes, as well as our back four, in allowing goals.”With the win, Cunningham said OSU no longer faces the pressure of taking its first victory.“It’s hard to explain, once you lose a couple of games in a row, it seems like impossible to win,” said Cunningham. “So getting out of this hole was really important for us, and for us to win our first game, it was really important.” read more

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TT expert believes Guyana can expect better oil deal next round

Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedPresidential Advisor briefs Cabinet on oil and gas sector development potentialMarch 28, 2017In “latest news”Oil production in 2020: Govt awaiting independent reports to determine if possible – TrotmanMay 30, 2017In “Business”How Guyana must prepare to cope with the ‘jeopardies and perils’ of oil discoverySeptember 4, 2018In “latest news” By Samuel SukhnandanA Caribbean expert in the oil and gas industry believes Guyana has the opportunity to get a better deal when finalising a contract for the second oil find, and will stand a greater advantage given the global name it has made for itself, due to the hold-massive oil discoveries made here.Former petroleum company of T&T (Petrotrin) Chairman, Donald Baldeosingh, responding to a query from Guyana Times’ Associate Editor, Mark Ramotar, following his lecture on oil and gas at Nations University on WednesdayDonald Baldeosingh who delivered a lecture on oil and gas, using the Caribbean context at the Nations University on Wednesday evening, said there are a lot more opportunities to be garnered from the recent oil discoveries and other potential discoveries both onshore and offshore Guyana.“Guyana is very prominent on the world oil map right at this moment. There is a lot of hype and a lot of interest. So, Guyana would be in a better position to negotiate another contract now in another block based on what is going on and what is happening in this phase,” he said.While there are many concerns regarding the Government’s reluctance in releasing the contract signed between them and US oil giant ExxonMobil, the Trinidadian oil and gas expert said the time has come for everyone to stop dwelling on the past and focus on the opportunities that lies ahead.Baldeosingh, a former Chairman of the Petroleum Company of Trinidad and Tobago Limited (Petrotrin) and the current President of the ENMAN Group said that Guyanese need to be patient because information regarding how much Guyana gets and spends from its oil revenues will be made public.He said, “They will be able to do their own arithmetic to figure out what that means in relation to production of the oil. I also feel as more and more Guyanese go up the learning curve, understanding the contracts, there will be less and less unease about how they are currently structured.”While Guyana will be receiving a two per cent royalty on gross earnings and 50 per cent of the profits of the oil proceeds when production begins, some people feel that is not enough.He said there are several options that are available to Guyana to change the contract, but he feels given that the first contract has already been inked; doing that could only lead to uncertainty in the future with other companies. Baldeosingh warned the Government not to pursue this matter.“I think we just have to accept that this is what is happening,” he said, while asserting that Guyana accepted a deal based on limited experience.Another important factor that Baldeosingh spoke about is the fact that the Government of the day needs to exercise a high level of discipline, when dealing with the oil revenues. He said while it may be good to use this money to assist with the development of infrastructure and telecommunication, if the money is not appropriately spent, Guyana could experience the same issues as Trinidad and Tobago.“There is not always going to be a feast, but there are famines too. So, Guyana needs to set up a regulatory framework and a good step in that direction of course is a Sovereign Wealth Fund (SWF). But that’s not all, setting it up is fine, but you need to ensure that it is properly managed,” he added. read more

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Montabert the FUTURE project

first_imgIn its FUTURE (Focus on Upgrading Technology and Utilization to Reach Excellence) project, Montabert will develop new IT systems and more efficient work processes which it intends “will open up new possibilities and improved functionality: Updating interfaces, better reliability, accuracy of data, reactivity and process fluidity. These new systems and new processes will allow us to keep up with the growth we are hoping for by improving our reactivity and the level of service we give to our customers.”The integrated software package (ERP) that has been chosen is SAP. A CRM tool (Customer Relationship Management) will be implemented and the customer portal will be redesigned.The implementation is planned for the first quarter of 2018. The implementation will be preceded by steps of study and testing.A team of about ten Montabert employees, dedicated to the project, is already in existence. Work started at the beginning of April 2017. After this first phase, there will be a second, during which the company will deploy additional tools: supplier portal and production management tool that will enable it to improve the reliability of delivery times.last_img read more

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Foundation luncheon to honor philanthropists

first_imgThe Community Foundation for Southwest Washington’s June 6 luncheon will recognize Michele and Greg Goodwin as the 2017 Philanthropists of the Year for their work championing capital campaigns and supporting local services for youth development, comprehensive health and education. Greg Goodwin is executive vice president and senior adviser for Holman Automotive, and was previously the CEO of Kuni Automotive.He’s also an honorary adviser for the Wayne D. Kuni and Joan E. Kuni Foundation, one of Southwest Washington’s largest private charitable foundations, that recently created a $50 million fund for cancer and other medical research and to enhance the lives of developmentally disabled adults.Michael Burgoyne will get the Friend of the Foundation award “for providing both professional and personal support to the Community Foundation’s mission of promoting philanthropy in Southwest Washington,” the Community Foundation said in a news release.The luncheon is noon to 1:30 p.m. at the Hilton Vancouver Washington, with a half-hour prior for networking.A few local residents will share stories about how philanthropy has impacted their lives. It’s part of the theme of the luncheon and storytelling campaign of the same name: Giving Out Loud. More information about the storytelling project is online at cfsww.org/giving-out-loud.For tickets to the luncheon, visit www.cfsww.org.last_img read more

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Audis 2019 Super Bowl ad proves its ETron GT is to die

first_imgAudi’s 2019 Super Bowl is called “Cashew” and at first glance it’s not obvious why. It opens on a young man doing that weird Russell-Crowe-in-Gladiator hand in the wheat field thing as he approaches an isolated house. It kind of goes off the rails from there.Upon nearing the house, our protagonist is greeted by an elderly man on the porch who is revealed to be his grandfather. The two enter a weird garage laboratory and the old man pulls a sheet off of a vehicle that ends up being the Audi E-Tron GT concept — (also known as the best-looking debut of the 2018 LA Auto Show).Upon sliding into the fancy cloth-covered driver’s seat, our young man is jolted violently, and it’s then that the name of the ad starts to make sense. He’s receiving the Heimlich maneuver from a coworker and coughs up the aforementioned drupe. More about 2019 Audi E-Tron Car Industry Luxury cars Electric Cars Car Culture It’s not entirely clear what Audi’s new Super Bowl ad is trying to sell, considering that we don’t expect to see the E-Tron GT as a production model until 2020, but still, any excuse to ogle it and have a laugh is fine by us.In case you need a brief refresher, the E-Tron GT is a fully electric concept car that packs a 90-kilowatt-hour battery and motors that produce just shy of 600 horsepower. Like Porsche’s forthcoming Taycan, the E-Tron GT will support 800-volt charging that should allow it to recover around 200 miles of range in just 20 minutes.Better yet, Audi recently let us drive the multi-million-dollar E-Tron GT concept on the mean streets of Los Angeles. You can read all about it here. 26 Photos Super Bowl 2019 Comment May 7 • 2020 Toyota Supra first drive review: More reset than reboot 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better See All Feb 28 • Last chance to get 3 months of Mint Mobile service for $20 Preview • 2019 Audi E-Tron: A worry-free, all-EV SUV Super Bowl 2019 Audicenter_img Share your voice Aug 14 • Raising the entry-level bar Audi E-Tron GT concept on the streets of Los Angeles reading • Audi’s 2019 Super Bowl ad shows its E-Tron GT is to die for 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value • 1 News • 2019 Audi E-Tron SUV range and on-sale date released Tags Feb 7 • Every Avengers: Endgame character flash at the start of that Super Bowl trailer More From Roadshow Audilast_img read more

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House Science to EPA drop Pebble Mine veto

first_imgLamar Smith, R-Texas, chairs the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, which penned a letter Wednesday asking EPA to drop the veto of Pebble Mine and allow permitting to proceed.(US Congress)In a letter Wednesday to new EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt, the chairman of the House Science Committee asked that the agency rescind its 2014 veto of the Pebble Mine. EPA proposed the preemptive Clean Water Act restrictions based on findings from its Bristol Bay Watershed Assessment, and did so with the support of many area tribes, fishermen, and environmental groups. But others say EPA has created an unfair regulatory process not based on rule of law, and are likely to find a receptive audience with the new administration.Listen nowTexas Republican Rep. Lamar Smith has made the agency’s work in Bristol Bay a top priority of the oversight committee he chairs. Over the past several years, House Science held a number of meetings, deposed witnesses, and reviewed hundreds of pages of documents and emails, leaving Smith with the firm opinion that the agency acted improperly.“In the course of the Committee’s investigation, we discovered that EPA employees colluded with third-party Pebble Mine opponents,” Smith said last April. “They sought to deliberately establish a record that pointed to one outcome: that Pebble Mine will be excluded from the regular permitting process and should be stopped.”In his letter to Administrator Pruitt, Smith called EPA’s 2014 preemptive veto “unprecedented,” “biased” and based on “questionable” science. He wrote that allowing it to stand will create a “dangerous precedent of expansive federal agency powers.”“This Committee should support due process, protect the permitting process, and insist that EPA actions be based on objective science,” Smith said during April hearing. “The EPA violated all of these tenets in its evaluation of the Pebble Mine. The Committee should not allow EPA to stop projects before they even apply for a permit. This would be contrary to the rule of law and the principles of scientific analysis.”Smith called on Pruitt to rescind the restrictions, which have not yet been finalized. A federal judge put a hold on the agency’s work surrounding Pebble and the Bristol Bay Watershed Assessment while one of Pebble’s several lawsuits against EPA is litigated.Scott Pruitt addressing EPA staff Tuesday.(Environmental Protection Agency)Scott Pruitt is the former Attorney General of Oklahoma, and made a name for himself as a fierce critic of EPA. In a speech to his new staff Tuesday he laid out three principles he intends to lead the agency towards: following the rule of law, keeping the regulatory process fair, and working better with states.“I read those things with a happy heart, and I think that they bode well for a decision that will reverse what the existing EPA has done, and allow us to go into permitting,” Pebble CEO Tom Collier said recently of Pruitt’s previously stated principles. “Some people think that this dispute we’ve been having with EPA is over whether or not we can build the project. I can’t emphasize enough that it is simply over whether or not we can file a permit application.”But Pruitt has also stressed he intends to lead by listening, and wants to encourage rigorous debate on contentious environmental issues.“We ought to be able to get together and wrestle through some very difficult issues, and do so in a civil manner,” Pruitt said in his speech Tuesday. “We ought to be able to be thoughtful, and exchange ideas, and engage in debate, and make sure that we do find answers to these problems. But do so with civility.”Bristol Bay and Pebble opponents have long and loudly voiced concerns, drawing growing attention to the potential threat to one of the world’s last great salmon habitats. Since launching its watershed assessment six or seven years ago, top EPA officials have held more than two dozen public hearings in Bristol Bay, around Alaska, and in Seattle and Washington D.C., and taken in a mountain of public comments. Most of the testimony heard and comments received have been supportive of the agency’s work.Tom Tilden and Ralph Andersen flank former EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy at a public hearing in Dillingham in 2013. (Misty Nielsen)Kim Williams, the director Nunamta Aulukestai, said Pebble’s opposition will make sure the new administration hears the same message Obama did.“We’ll continue to speak out to President Trump and the Administrator, to reaffirm that this project will need a permit, and this region is opposed to any kind of dredge and fill material entering our salmon streams,” Williams said.EPA has not responded to the House Science recommendation it toss the agency’s watershed assessment and proposed preemptive Pebble veto. The agency has also not yet named a Region 10 administrator to replace Dennis McLerran, who guided the unique but perhaps fragile work in Bristol Bay.last_img read more

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International Snacks Festival at metro stations from Aug 30

first_imgHyderabad: The Telangana Tourism and the Department of Language & Culture in association with Culture language Indian Connections (CLIC), Hyderabad Metro Rail Limited (HMRL), L&T Metro is organising an International Snacks Festival from August 30 to September 1 at four metro stations in city.Burra Venkatesham, Secretary, CLIC said that the festival would be held in Uppal metro, Ameerpet metro, Hitech city metro and MGBS metro stations. Participants from more than 10 Indian communities and 8 International communities are going to participate in the above festival. The festival will be from 3pm to till 9pm daily for all the three days. Also Read – Unidentified assailants killed a person in Saidabad PS limits Advertise With Us He recalled with his experience that the festival is all about women empowerment and the event is only a reason to create bonding and bonhomie with various communities in one platform. The platform is also to encourage the home makers to display and sell their home made food products. There will also be a showcase of cultural program from different communities including International participants. The international participants include participants from Ethiopia, Argentina, Spain, Sudan, Switzerland, South Korea and China. NVS Reddy, MD, HMRL explained in detail how the metro station can become an epic centre towards promoting Indian culture and heritage. He was very happy to extend all support to this festival and said that HMRL and L& T Metro will offer the space and all infrastructural support to make the festival a grand success.last_img read more

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No Dogs Cant Talk to People

first_img You may have seen a few articles going around suggesting that dogs can “speak” to humans. It’s based on a study that found that people were a bit more accurate than guessing at what their dogs’ barks and growls mean. That’s cool! For sure, it’s clear evidence of interspecies communication, but that’s also not exactly special.We understand that cats hiss when they’re upset. There’s something innate that most of us just get. Animals puff themselves way up to intimidate one another all the time. The number of hisses, yowls, and grunts we totally understand from the animals around us is huge. Evolution supports having an array of basic emotions you can communicate to any other creature you find. It lets you reliably ward off predators or mark territory. While most animals can fight, it’s not usually a good idea. Fighting, in the animal kingdom as in the real world, puts all parties at huge risk for injury and loss. And when you’re alone in the natural world, you really don’t want to risk, much less have an injury. For many, it could be a death sentence.What this study does is demonstrate that we can understand very, very basic concepts from creatures that we have selectively bred for at least ten thousand years. Most of these vocalizations we could understand in wolves or other canids. The study also mentions that dog owners are a bit better at recognizing what different sounds mean than their counterparts. And that has to be one of the most obvious observations of all time.Now, I won’t attack the study itself. Science only works when we challenge even obvious things because we could always get surprising results. All studies, when properly designed and reproducible, can contribute to the net growth of human knowledge. What I object to is how others at the Daily Mail, for instance, have blown up the study for clicks and claim it says things when it doesn’t. Blowing study results out of proportion is a perennial problem in science communication, and it regularly confuses the public about things as basic as nutrition. It leads to a fundamental mistrust of science and the scientific method and just makes us all look bad.So think before you share something, and when we, as science communicators, make mistakes, call us out. Stay on target Geek Pick: Fi Smart Dog Collar Sniffs Out Your PetMan Saves Dog Left Tied to Electrical Cord on Side of Interstate Overpass last_img read more

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Federal Requirements for Clinical Decision Support for Imaging

first_imgFeature | Clinical Decision Support | February 03, 2016 | Dave Fornell Federal Requirements for Clinical Decision Support for Imaging Although delayed, the groundwork for CDS requirements has been created and new implementation deadlines are being set for 2017 The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s. Related Content Goal of Changing Physician BehaviorOnce the CDS requirement is implemented, documentation will need to include the national provider identification, identify the CDS systems used and whether the CDS was consulted, said Curtis Langlotz, M.D., Ph.D., medical informatics director for radiology, Stanford Healthcare, Calif. He said based on the original implmentation date of Jan. 1, 2017, two years of this data would be collected as of Jan. 1, 2020. At that time, CMS would create a list of the 5 percent of outlier physicians. “There is no requirement that the physician needs to follow the CDS advice, but it needs to be available,” Langlotz said. But, if they consistently do not follow AUC, that is when it will become a problem.He said these outlier physicians who continually disregard AUC recommendations listed in their CDS would be required to get pre-authorization for their orders after 2020. However, this deadline will now likely be moved back along with the rest of the CDS timeline.  “The goal is to change ordering behavior,” Langlotz said, explaining CDS guidance and the threat of lower reimbursement will help providers make more economical decisions based on evidence-based medicine. He said the need for CDS in imaging and other tests is similar to the need for pharmaceutical computerized physician order entry (CPOE) systems that have been around for a decade. Pharma CPOE systems are now widely implemented in healthcare to eliminate the major patient safety concerns due to potential drug interactions, inappropriate or dangerous doses, wrong drugs, and to catch redundant or inappropriate drug prescriptions. CMS hopes similar CPOE for diagnostic tests and imaging will have a similar impact to reduce the number of inappropriate or high-cost tests when less expensive and more appropriate options are available based on AUC.Defining CDS for CMSCDS may be a burdensome regulatory exercise unless CMS puts in place rules and implementation processes, said Keith White, M.D., medical director of imaging services, Intermountain Health, Utah. This includes the need for local engagement with clinicians, which might include multidisciplinary team input on rules that are created. White said there needs to be a focus on evidence-based medicine, and one issue is that a lot of AUC is based on expert opinion, not clinical data. CDS also needs to offer a seamless workflow, otherwise clinicians will work around it. These CDS systems also should have a way to provide feedback so the system can be improved. “We need to get clarity on what AUC will need to be included on these systems,” White explained. This will drive the creation guidelines for specific conditions instead of attempting to boil the ocean. He said CMS should periodically specify general clinical conditions for which ordering physicians need to consult CDS. These might include creation of pathways for specific conditions such as pulmonary embolism or chest pain. White said a primary group helping CMS determine what should be in guidance documents for CDS requirements is the High Value Healthcare Collaborative (HVHC). This consortium of 17 healthcare systems and The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice is working to improve healthcare value by defining quality and outcomes over costs across time, in a sustainable manner, while serving as a model for national healthcare reform. The group has had meetings to hash out some of the details for CDS requirements and is passing these recommendations onto CMS. “The recommendations from PAMA and the HVHC will be baked into the final CMS rules,” Hutter said. He said CMS wants the rules to be based on grassroot efforts from hospitals and the medical societies, not dictated by the government. “You are part of it and you can change it, but you need to speak up,” Hutter said. “We will get some things wrong and we will need to fix them, but we need feedback from the providers. There is no secret sauce or black box to make everything work perfectly. If there is another protocol out there we are not aware of, let us know about it.”One question raised about the establishment of PLEs is that CMS needs to make sure competing technologies supported by various societies do not create rules that establish one as the preferred imaging modality over another. An example of this might be the use of computed tomography (CT) over magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or use of MRI over nuclear imaging. However, the flipside of that argument is that providers should not use AUC rules that are written to favor what resources they have available if they do not have a nuclear imaging program or access to MRI at their facility.“Transparency is very important,” Hutter said, addressing these concerns. He said there is a need for a transparent process for how the evidence-based rules are created and agreed on. If an MRI is indicated by AUC, then a patient needs to be told by the facility where they can get access to an MRI. However, if MRI is indicated by AUC but is only available during daytime hours and imaging is needed immediately, then a CT might be the next best option depending on the situation, he explained.The Evolution of Cost Controls Leading to Clinical Decision SupportThe federal requirement for CDS software came from an evolution in federal efforts to reduce rapidly rising healthcare costs, explained Keith Dreyer, D.O., Ph.D., FACR, FSIIM, vice chairman of radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital and associate professor of radiology at the Harvard Medical School, Boston. He spoke at the RSNA 2015 meeting. In 2005, Congress passed the Deficit Reduction Act (DRA), which was designed to cut rapidly rising imaging costs in Medicare. To do this, the DRA established the sustainable growth rate (SGR) formula, which began yearly cuts in reimbursements across radiology. In 2008, Dreyer said the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act (MIPPA) required providers of high-ticket CT, MRI and nuclear imaging services to become accredited through the American College of Radiology (ACR), Joint Commission or other designated bodies. In 2010, Congress passed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), which set criteria for healthcare reforms that are largely driven by information technology (IT) implementations needed to avoid CMS reimbursement cuts. Dreyer said this has led to an explosion in electronic health record (EHR) adoption in the past few years. The proliferation of EHRs now allows for the implementation of CDS software based on AUC. Between 2011 and 2012 the ACR Select AUC CDS integration was started to check the appropriateness of imaging exams for various patient presentations and conditions. In 2014, Dreyer said Congress adopted an AUC requirement in the SGR patch that was part of the PAMA. This act prevented a 24 percent reimbursement reduction originally schedule through the DRA. He explained the AUC requirement was accepted as a way to help cut imaging costs because of its overwhelming support by numerous medical societies. Dreyer said Massachusetts General Hospital has been an early adopter of CDS for imaging and has seen a noticeable decline in high-cost exams after implementation of its CDS program.  FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Videos | Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President … read more News | Artificial Intelligence | August 08, 2019 Half of Hospital Decision Makers Plan to Invest in AI by 2021 August 8, 2019 — A recent study conducted by Olive AI explores how hospital leaders are responding to the imperative read more News | Electronic Medical Records (EMR) | August 01, 2019 DrChrono Teams With DeepScribe to Automate Medical Note Taking in EHR DrChrono Inc. and DeepScribe announced a partnership so medical practices using DrChrono EHR can use artificial… read more Image courtesy of Philips HealthcareHealthcare providers will need to start preparing for the next big healthcare information technology (IT) implementation — clinical decision support (CDS) software. Under congressional legislation based on a compromise between numerous medical societies to accept required CDS documentation for Medicare reimbursements, large scheduled cuts in reimbursements were suspended in the 2014 Protecting Access to Medicare Act (PAMA). A deadline was originally set for providers to begin required use of CDS starting in 2017, but it is likely this will be pushed back to 2018 or later. The new Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) CDS requirements were the focus of a session at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015 meeting in December. Joseph Hutter, M.D., lieutenant commander in the U.S. Public Health Service who is with the CMS Center for Clinical Standards and Quality, defined the major components of the planned requirement. This includes the need for appropriate use criteria (AUC) to be developed by provider-led entities (PLE) such as medical societies. Providers will need to implement a CMS-qualified CDS system. These systems will need to provide documentation on the Medicare claims. The systems also will require prior authorizations reserved for consistent claims outliers in the future. The PAMA included a timeline for CDS software development and implementation. It originally required the first sets of AUC to be specified by November 2015, but this has now been moved to June 30, 2016, Hutter said. These rules are supposed to be designated by PLEs, and the first round of applications to become a PLE started Jan. 1, 2016. PAMA also required the initial list of CDS mechanisms to be approved and available by April 2016, but this has now been moved to the more realistic time frame of June 30, 2017, he explained. However, Hutter said picture archiving and communication system (PACS) vendors told CMS it would take at least 12 to 18 months for them to program and deploy CDS solutions in their annual software updates. That timeline is based on when they received the final parameters for what AUC rules need to be included in such software.Additionally, healthcare IT departments faced a major implementation of ICD-10 codes in 2015, with the codes going live nationwide Oct. 1 last year. The government realized it would be difficult for most health systems to immediately implement or budget for CDS software based on the original deadline. This is especially true since PACS vendors have not even created CDS software yet for providers to evaluate. Hutter said this would logically delay when physicians will be required to report AUC consultations on claim forms, which was originally set for Jan. 1, 2017. He said the new deadline for implementation has not yet been set and will likely depend on when AUC and rules for CDS software can be fully outlined. Based on the PACS vendor timelines to implement any new software, it is unlikely CDS will become a requirement until at least the summer of 2018.(UPDATE June 2017: Watch the VIDEO “Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging,” a discussion with Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting.) News | Artificial Intelligence | August 05, 2019 Montefiore Nyack Hospital Uses Aidoc AI to Spot Urgent Conditions Faster Montefiore Nyack Hospital, an acute care hospital in Rockland County, N.Y., announced it is utilizing artificial… read more Technology | Cybersecurity | August 07, 2019 ScImage Introduces PICOM ModalityGuard for Cybersecurity ScImage Inc. is bridging the gap between security and functionality with the introduction of the PICOM ModalityGuard…. read more News | PACS | August 08, 2019 NetDirector Launches Cloud-based PDF to DICOM Conversion Service NetDirector, a cloud-based data exchange and integration platform, has diversified their radiology automation options… read more News | Radiology Business | August 01, 2019 Philips Completes Acquisition of Carestream Health’s HCIS Business … read more Feature | August 05, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor Most Popular Radiology and Radiotherapy Topics in July 2019 August 5, 2019 — Here is the list of the most popular content on the Imaging Technology New (ITN) magazine website fr read more Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 7:33Loaded: 2.15%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -7:33 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. News | PACS | August 09, 2019 Lake Medical Imaging Selects Infinitt for Multi-site RIS/PACS Infinitt North America will be implementing Infinitt RIS (radiology information system)/PACS (picture archiving and… read more Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more The top piece of content in July was a video interview explaining how Princess Margaret Cancer Center is using machine learning to create automated treatment plans. This was a hot topic at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting in July. last_img read more

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JD Power Dont Sell Advise

first_img in Daily Dose, Headlines, News, Origination Consumers J.D. Power mortgage 2017-03-01 Staff Writer March 1, 2017 525 Views J.D. Power: Don’t Sell, Advisecenter_img What do consumers think about their financial service providers? In a recent report, J.D. Power surveyed 1,000 customers in order to answer just that question and to reveal the perceptions consumers had of their experience with financial services.What they found is that most customers are pleased with their bank or lender, and these companies are enjoying strong customer loyalty. Eighty-one percent of those surveyed believe their bank acts ethically, 82 percent trust their bank to do the right thing, and 79 percent feel their bank acts in their best interest. However, 17 percent of mortgage customers regretted choosing their lender. Out of this 17 percent, 72 percent said there was too much pressure on them to choose a specific product. Only 6 percent of customers with no buyer’s remorse say they felt pressured.With so much pressure put on them, customers may be confused about what product they are being offered. Among that 17 percent of mortgage customers who regretted their final choice of product, 24 percent say that the loan rep did not explain the loan terms. Mortgage customers experiencing buyer’s remorse or sales pressure are three times less likely to consider using the same lender on a different mortgage and over twice as likely to not recommend a lender.J.D. Power’s study finds that 67 percent of customers who “strongly agree” that their bank/lender works with them to find the right product say that they “definitely will” be a returning customer. Sixty percent of customers act on the advice that they have been given and 62 percent open new products, but only 34 percent of customers who did not receive advice open new products. J.D. Power suggests approaching customers with a mindset of advising customers rather than selling a product. Avoid the hard sell when a customer is choosing a mortgage product and focus on assisting the customer in making the best decision to gain customer loyalty.View the full report from J.D. Power here. Sharelast_img read more

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