Brazil to Create Cyber Military Defense for World Cup, Olympics

first_imgBy Dialogo January 02, 2013 Brazil will create a specialized military organization to prevent cyber attacks during the major sports events it will host in the upcoming years, namely the 2014 World Cup, and the 2016 Summer Olympics, according to an official publication on December 27. The Military System of Cyber Defense (for its Portuguese acronym SMDC) will rely on the Army, and is currently part of a protection policy against cyber attacks designed by the Ministry of Defense, an official source of the ministry told AFP. Besides the World Cup and the Olympics, Brazil will host the soccer Confederations Cup, as well as the visit of Pope Benedict XVI. The policy is designed in view of “the massive upcoming events to take place in the next years” in Brazil, the source stated. For the United Nations environmental summit, Rio +20, the Army activated a unit to control network connections. center_img Two months ago, the Brazilian Congress passed a law against cyber crimes, which forbids racist contents and penalizes the illegal violation of email accounts. According to the legal publication, the SMDC will cooperate with the Armed Forces’ intelligence apparatus, and will count on civil society contributors, including academics, and private and defense industry sectors,” the source explained. “The cyber actions in the Ministry of Defense framework are aimed to secure the use of cyber space, and block and prevent its use against the interests of the country,” the official decree stated. last_img read more

Read More →

Colombian Armed Forces Capture Members of ELN and Los Pelusos

first_imgBy Yolima Dussán/Diálogo April 15, 2019 Units of the Colombian Armed Forces captured Juan Gabriel Villa, alias Gabino, leader of the National Liberation Army (ELN, in Spanish), and Jesús Alirio Téllez, alias Chunga, member of the organized armed group (GAO, in Spanish) Los Pelusos, on February 27, 2019. Two simultaneous operations in Antioquia and Norte de Santander departments facilitated the arrests. Alias Gabino, neutralized Units of the Colombian Army, Air Force, and National Police arrested alias Gabino, leader of an ELN criminal gang, in Anorí municipality, Antioquia department. Authorities found the criminal’s hiding spot thanks to information from the Civic Participation Network, which allows citizens to report illicit activities anonymously. “This man has been breaking the law for more than eight years, killing soldiers and police officers, and burning vehicles in the area. He then became the second leader of Héroes de Anorí front, and from there coordinated all illicit profits from narcotrafficking,” Brigadier General Juan Carlos Ramírez Trujillo, commander of the Colombian Army’s Seventh Division, told the press. “His arrest deals another blow to this GAO, affecting the structure in municipalities such as El Bagre, Valdivia, Cáceres, Tarazá, Zaragoza, Nechí, and Amalfi, among others.” Alias Gabino’s criminal history includes the murder of public force members in 2014 and 2016, as well as the kidnapping of six people in the Amalfi area, including two minors. He is also accused of attacking Anorí’s police station with fragmentation grenades on January 22, 2019, and of an attack against an electrical tower that supplies companies and communities in the area. “After neutralizing alias Gabino, we were able to reduce ELN’s logistics and terrorist capabilities,” the Seventh Division said in a press release. Colombian authorities dealt continuous blows to ELN in 2019. So far this year, the Army arrested 39 members of ELN’s Western and Darío Ramírez Castro war fronts in the country’s northwest. The national offensive against crime covers all criminal structures. Chunga and his gang Alias Chunga, also captured on February 27, kidnapped and extorted mayors and retailers in Ocaña province, Norte de Santander department, and provided weapons to Los Pelusos. The departmental police sought him for murder, narcotrafficking, and possession of illegal firearms. “Chunga is the alleged mastermind behind the murders of retailers Carlos Andrés Rincón and Jonatán Moros,” Norte de Santander Police told the press. “The crimes were committed on November 18, 2018, in [a restaurant in] Cúcuta.” The Criminal Investigation and Police Intelligence Division and the Office of the Attorney General led the operation, which also brought about the capture of José Javier León Vega, alias Jaguar; Roque Antonio Rueda, alias Rocoso; and a woman who was Chunga’s romantic partner and accomplice in his criminal activities. The four were members of Los Pelusos. “Alias Jaguar was in charge of marketing drugs, trafficking foreign currency, and acquiring weapons,” the police reported. “Rocoso sold stolen vehicles and drugs, and trafficked foreign currency, weapons, and ammunition.” Units of the Office of the Attorney General searched the place where the gang was captured and found weapons and different types of ammunition. Rocoso obtained money to buy military gear through real estate and vehicle mortgages from this organization, in addition to delivering drugs to Mexican cartels. Colombian President Iván Duque told the press that “joint work showed that in six months we were able to prosecute more than 10,000 criminals.” He added, “We struck the Clan del Golfo, Los Puntilleros, Los Pelusos, and the ELN terrorist group, and we will continue to do so.”last_img read more

Read More →

Briefs

first_imgBroward Legal Aid targets at-risk kids Legal Aid Service of Broward County has recently begun a new program, the Bridge, to help meet the needs of at-risk children in Broward County. The Bridge will serve young people who are in the dependency system due to abuse and neglect and who also have juvenile court issues. The program will advocate for children so that they receive services that are beneficial to them in building a better future and assuring good coordination of the child’s case. The Equal Justice Works Foundation has provided funding for a two-year fellowship to establish the Bridge project. Equal Justice Works is the country’s leading organization engaged in coordinating, training, and supporting public service minded law students and is the national leader in creating summer and postgraduate public interest jobs. The Equal Justice Works Fellowships program is the largest postgraduate legal fellowship program in the country. Melissa Zeiniker has joined Legal Aid as staff attorney and project coordinator for the Bridge.Cummings to lead Brevard Paralegals The Brevard Paralegal Association recently installed Cathleen Cummings as its new president. Other officers include First Vice President Nandra Ramnarine; Second Vice President JoAnn Daszuta; Treasurer Kay Jones; Recording Secretary Renee Roche; Corresponding Secretary Shirley Gaier; and Member-at-Large Cynthia Martinez. The association also presented its 2002 Community Service Award to lawyer Leonard Spielvogel and its Professional Development Scholarship to Cynthia Martinez. Sen. Bill Posey, R-Rockledge, gave the keynote address. The Brevard Paralegal Association holds dinner meetings on the second Thursday of each month featuring local attorneys and judges as speakers, at the Hilton Melbourne Airport (Rialto) Hotel. For more information, call Cummings at (321) 308-8020.Leopold to lead PB B’nai B’rith Theodore J. Leopold has been appointed president of the B’nai B’rith Palm Beach Justice Unit. B’nai B’rith is one of the world’s oldest service organizations, having been founded in 1843, and is active in 56 countries on six continents. Through many avenues, B’nai B’rith members make a difference for the community by making significant and positive contributions. The B’nai B’rith Palm Beach Justice Unit is a local chapter of B’nai B’rith International. BriefsMiami pro bono effort recognized nationally The University of Miami School of Law’s HOPE Program (Helping Others Through Pro Bono Efforts) recently won two national awards for its public interest work. The program was awarded the 2002 Award for Outstanding Public Service Project, from Equal Justice Works, formerly the National Association for Public Interest Law. The award honors HOPE’s inaugural Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Project. Working with Legal Services of Greater Miami, HOPE recruited 23 law student volunteers who worked a total of 380 hours from January through April 15 of this year to provide 162 low income, disabled, and elderly individuals with help in the preparation of tax forms and other assistance. The program also received the ABA Law Student Division’s Award for Rookie Site of the Year, which honors the best new VITA site in the country. HOPE matches UM law students with legal and community service organizations. The program lets UM students serve underrepresented populations, helping public interest agencies that lack the budget to hire clerks.UF law journal now available The spring 2002 issue of the University of Florida Journal of Law and Public Policy is now available. The issue features articles on a wide range of legal and business policy issues including health care and collective bargaining. Journal contributors are as diverse as the issues they talk about. Contributions are from legal professionals and educators nationwide. The issue features “Florida’s Sunshine Law: The Undecided Legal Issue,” by Peter H. Seed; “Collective Bargaining in the Elite Professions — Doctors’ Application of the Labor Law Model to Negotiations with Health Care Providers,” by Tracey I. Levy; and “A Drug by Any Other Name Is Still a Drug: Why the Florida Judiciary Should Start Treating DUI as any Other Drug Offense,” by Gail Sasnett-Stauffer and E. John Gregory. Additionally, the student works published have contributed to the array of policy issues examined in this latest journal installment. Of note is “The Patentability of Embryonic Stem Cell Research Results,” by Damon J. Whitaker, and “Case Comment is Constitutional Law: The Eleventh Amendment, the Fourteenth Amendment and Rational Basis Review, Board of Trustees v. Garrett, 121 S. Ct. 955 (2001),” by Scott Givens. For subscription information contact Victoria A. Redd at reddva@law.ufl.edu. November 15, 2002 Regular Newscenter_img Briefslast_img read more

Read More →

The ethical implications of the lobbyist disclosure statute

first_img The ethical implications of the lobbyist disclosure statute The ethical implications of the lobbyist disclosure statute Florida Bar staff has received inquiries on the ethical implications of the new lobbying disclosure statute. The following article provides a brief description of the new law, and Bar staff opinion on the ethical implications of that law, in order to quickly provide Florida Bar members who are lobbyists with advice on how the new statute may affect their ethical responsibilities to clients.The Florida Legislature recently enacted new requirements for all lobbyists and lobbying firms and their lobbying clients, which was signed by Gov. Jeb Bush on December 20, 2005. The legislation is effective January 1, 2006. The legislation, Chapter 2005-359, Laws of Florida, requires all lobbyists to identify their lobbying clients’ “main business” at the time the lobbyists register. The new law requires lobbying firms, including individual contract lobbyists, to make quarterly reports on the amount of compensation paid to the lobbyist or lobbying firm for lobbying activities by each lobbying client.The statute defines lobbying as “influencing or attempting to influence legislative action or nonaction through oral or written communication or an attempt to obtain the goodwill of a member or employee of the legislature.”The legislation also provides that random audits of a specified percentage of lobbying firms shall be made to determine compliance with the legislation. A lobbying firm may also be audited as a result of a failure to file required reports or based on a complaint. The new law also requires lobbyists and lobbying firms to keep specific records that would substantiate the compensation paid for lobbying activities for four years and to allow auditor access to these records at the request of the auditor. The statute provides for legislative subpoena to obtain the records. Auditing provisions are effective February 15, 2007.The new law imposes similar registration and reporting requirements on those who lobby the executive branch of state government. The new law provides that lobbying before the executive branch is “seeking, on behalf of another person, to influence an agency with respect to a decision of the agency in the area of policy or procurement or an attempt to obtain the goodwill of an agency official or employee.” The term “agency” includes the governor, the Cabinet, and any department, division, bureau, board, commission, or authority of the executive branch. Agency officials and employees are specifically defined as those persons required by law to file a full or limited public disclosure of their financial interests.Specifically exempted from the definition of a lobbyist before the executive branch is “an attorney, or any person, who represents a client in a judicial proceeding or in a formal administrative proceeding conducted pursuant to Ch. 120 or any other formal hearing before an agency, board, commission, or authority of this state.”The text of the legislation can be found on the Senate’s Web site at www.flsenate.gov. Once there, enter the bill’s number, SB0040, in the bill seach feature on the left hand side of the page.This article addresses, in a question-and-answer format, ethical implications of the legislation for lawyers who perform lobbying activities. Q: If I am a lawyer who engages in lobbying, do the Rules of Professional Conduct (Ch. 4) in the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar apply to the lobbying activity? A: In almost all instances, the Rules of Professional Conduct will apply. Q: Under the Rules of Professional Conduct, is the information being sought by the legislature confidential? A: Under Rule 4-1.6, Rules Regulating The Florida Bar, all information that relates to a client’s representation is confidential and may not be disclosed voluntarily without the client’s consent, unless certain limited exceptions apply. None of the exceptions to the confidentiality rule are applicable to disclosure of compensation for lobbying services. Therefore, the information relating to the compensation is confidential. Q: If the information is confidential, how can I disclose it to comply with the statute? A: Lawyers who are lobbyists must obtain the consent of each client for whom the lawyer performs lobbying services as defined in the statute in order to comply with the statute’s disclosure requirements. The lawyer should seek consent to disclose only the information that is covered by the legislation and should assure the client that the lawyer will disclose no information that is not required to be disclosed by the statute. Q: How do I obtain clients’ consent? A: For new clients, lawyers should consider including a provision in fee contracts that explains the new statute’s disclosure requirements and obtain the client’s written consent via that contract. For existing clients, lawyers should consider providing written information about the new statute’s disclosure requirements and providing a written consent form for clients to sign. Appropriate disclosure to clients could include a brief summary of relevant portions of the statute affecting the client, that the statute is intended to be applicable to all lobbyists (both lawyers and nonlawyers), that the lawyer’s records may be subject to audit, and that the lawyer will not disclose information relating to any representation that is not required by the statute. Q: Must the client’s consent be in writing? A: The consent to disclosure of the information is not required to be in writing, but written consent is advisable. Q: What if a client refuses to consent to the disclosure of the information as required by the statute? A: If it is an existing client, the lawyer should withdraw from the representation to avoid violating the statute. If a prospective client refuses to consent to the disclosure, the lawyer should decline to represent the client in the lobbying activity. Q: What steps should I take to ensure that I don’t disclose anything that is not covered by the statute? A: Lawyers should consider segregating the information that relates to lobbying activities as defined in the statute from all other representation of the client. Lawyers should consider separating any accounting and billing records for lobbying activities from records that relate to other forms of representation. Lawyers should also consider reviewing their billing practices to ensure that no privileged information appears in such records, as the records may be audited. Q: What should I do if I receive a legislative subpoena to be audited? A: The lawyer should review the records being sought by subpoena to determine if the records contain any privileged (as opposed to merely confidential) information. If the records do not contain any privileged information, the lawyer may provide them to the auditor. If the records contain privileged information, the lawyer should seek a court determination on the issue of privilege and whether the record must be disclosed. As discussed above, all information relating to a client’s representation is confidential under Bar rules and cannot be voluntarily disclosed. Privilege is an evidentiary legal doctrine that is much narrower than confidentiality, concerning what information can be compelled to be disclosed. Privilege generally applies only to communications between a lawyer and client for the purpose of seeking and/or obtaining legal advice that no third party has been privy to. Q: What if the auditor does not subpoena my records, but merely asks me to cooperate in providing the records? A: The lawyer should ask the auditor to subpoena the records. Prepared by the Ethics & Advertising Department. Questions regarding a lawyer’s ethical responsibilities under the statute or any of the Rules of Professional Conduct may be directed to the Ethics Hotline at (800) 235-8619. The Ethics Hotline is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. E-mail inquiries may be sent to eto@flabar.org.center_img February 15, 2006 Regular Newslast_img read more

Read More →

Smithtown Couple Critically Injured in Crash

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A husband and wife from Smithtown were critically injured in a crash Friday night in East Northport, Suffolk County police said.According to police, 71-year-old Lucy DiPietro was exiting a Jericho Turnpike shopping center at 6:07 p.m. when a 2011 Mazda driving east in the left lane struck the car.DiPietro was airlifted to Stony Brook University Hospital where she was listed in critical condition with life-threatening injuries, police said. The 23-year-old driver of the Mazda and DiPietro’s 76-year-old husband, Matthew, were both transported to Huntington Hospital.Matthew was listed in critical condition, police said, and the woman driving the Mazda was treated for non-life-threatening injuries.Both vehicles were impounded for a safety check, police said. The investigation is ongoing. Detectives ask anyone with information regarding the crash to call the Second Squad at 631-854-8252.last_img read more

Read More →

Fire Island Nude Beach Outlawed

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Fire Island’s nude beaches are no more (Lighthouse Beach Times).Fire Island’s famed nude beaches have become the latest casualty of Superstorm Sandy.Fire Island National Seashore officials announced in early February that they will start enforcing New York State laws against public nudity at Lighthouse Beach, a clothing-optional beach between Robert Moses State Park Field 5 and Kismet that drew up to 4,000 nudists on summer days.“We have school groups and tour groups coming to that area and right next door there’s thousands of nude people,” said Lena Koschmann, chief FINS ranger, referring to the Fire Island Lighthouse, an adjacent tourist attraction. “That beach was never meant to be a heavily used beach.”Koschmann said that the Sandy-damaged boardwalk to the Fire Island Lighthouse means visitors will have to walk down the beach through the area where the nudists gathered. She added that the decision was also based on an increase in criminal activity at the nude beach, the lack of lifeguards and restrooms and the impact the crowds are having on the environment. Violators who ignore the ban face up to six months in jail and a fine of up to $5,000.Save Lighthouse Beach, a naturalist group, had tried to pre-empt the decision by starting a “Beach Ambassador” program to have volunteers remind the beach’s users to clean up after themselves and not break the law. But Koschmann said that despite such efforts, the nude beach increasingly became advertised online as a meeting place for public sex and prostitution.Lighthouse Beach was technically a pair of clothing optional beaches separated by a patch of non-nude beach in the area closest to the lighthouse to separate tourists and nudists. But even if the boardwalks were repaired in time for the summer season, the fact that the dunes had been decimated by Sandy means the beach is now visible from the lighthouse.Larry Jensen, who runs the nude beach website Lighthouse Beach Times, posted a farewell letter online suggesting he may leave New York and blaming the National Park Service that oversees FINS for the decision.“Many of you may have seen the thousand or so photos I have captured in an attempt to record just how amazing it was to me,” he wrote. “But alas it is but a memory now as the National Park Service has decided that me and my people are no longer welcome here.”The beach has been a destination for nudists since as early as the 1960s but it wasn’t formally recognized by FINS until 2005, according to Koschmann. New York State outlawed public nudity in 1984, but as a federal park, FINS had opted not to enforce that law.The new no-nudity rules comes as Robert Moses State Park remains closed four months after the Oct. 29 superstorm that ravaged Long Island’s barrier islands—especially FI. The ban will also be enforced in other nude-friendly beaches along FI, such as Cherry Grove to the east.“I’ve had a mixed response,” Koschmann said. “The majority of them are disappointed and asking us to rethink our decision, but I’ve also had some people calling in…who are supportive.”last_img read more

Read More →

Kings Park Man Dies After Struggle With Police

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 60-year-old Kings Park man who hit his head while being restrained by Suffolk County police officers at Stony Brook University Hospital three weeks ago died this weekend, authorities said.Officers had responded to a report that Lawrence Ports was behaving irrationally at his Hemlock Drive home when they called in the  Suffolk County Mental Health Mobile Crisis Team that determined Port be hospitalized Sept. 24.“Ports became combative and attempted to flee from the officers” while at the hospital, police said in a news release. Ports suffered a head injury during the struggle.He was treated at the hospital, where his condition deteriorated and he was pronounced dead Friday.His body was taken to the Suffolk County Medical Examiner’s office, where an autopsy will be performed to determine his cause of death.Police are continuing the investigation into the incident.last_img read more

Read More →

Man Found Dead in Copiague ID’d

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Suffolk County police have identified the 27-year-old man who they described as a “victim of violence” found dead behind a dumpster in his hometown of Copiague over the weekend.Police said the body of Elvis Canales was found Sunday afternoon behind a dumpster in a parking lot on Ralph Avenue.The victim’s body was taken to the Suffolk County Medical Examiner’s office, where an autopsy was being conducted to determine his cause of death.“He does have a hand injury, we are aware of how that occurred and were awaiting the conclusion of the medical examiner’s autopsy,” said Det. Lt. Jack Fitzpatrick, commander of the Homicide Squad.Homicide Squad detectives are continuing the investigating and ask anyone with any information about this case is asked to call them at 631-852-6392 or call anonymously to Suffolk County Crime Stoppers at 1-800-220-TIPS. All calls will be kept confidential.last_img read more

Read More →

Suffolk Cop Facing Upgraded Hate Crimes Charges for Allegedly Targeting Hispanics

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York An ex-Suffolk County police sergeant has been accused of stealing from Hispanic driversA former Suffolk County police sergeant has been indicted on upgraded hate crimes charges for allegedly pulling over Hispanic drivers under the pretense of traffic violations and stealing their money, authorities said.Scott Greene, a 25-year veteran who retired after his arrest in January, pleaded not guilty Monday at Suffolk County court grand larceny as a hate crime, petit larceny as a hate crime and seven counts of official misconduct.Prosecutors said six witnesses positively identified the 50-year-old cop after having been either drivers or passengers victimized by Greene, who allegedly sought out Hispanic drivers with out of state license plates, since 2010.“This defendant has used the authority of his badge purely for a thief’s motive,” Suffolk County District Attorney Tom Spota told reporters during a news conference at his Hauppauge office. “That is as an opportunity for him to steal. He’s brought discredit and shame to the badge that he once wore, but he will never wear again.”Victims allegedly told investigators that Greene told them he was searching their vehicles for contraband when he stole cash in $50 or $100 increments.The hate crimes charges were added because it is apparent that Greene specifically targeted only Hispanics, he added.Ten victims have come forward since prosecutors announced that Greene was caught in a sting in which he stole cash from an undercover Hispanic officer that he had stopped. Authorities announced the charges a month after the county settled a federal investigation into the police department’s handling of hate crimes complaints from Hispanic Long Islanders.Advocacy groups, particularly Make the Road New York, have been instrumental in helping to ensure additional alleged victims come forward without fear despite their immigration status. Investigators are also tracking down alleged victims in Ecuador, Honduras, and Mexico.Greene faces up to seven years in prison for each charge of grand larceny as a hate crime.Authorities urge anyone with information on this case to call 631-775-2077 or to contact Irma Solis at Make the Road New York 631-512-1587.last_img read more

Read More →

Redefine the NRA as a Terrorist/Lobby Organization

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The pro-gun activists are a slippery bunch. They understand the nuances that shape public conversation and exploit them to their greatest benefit. They are expert marketers. They make beaucoup sales.Remember when Kentucky Fried Chicken became simply KFC? By changing the name of their restaurant, they changed the unhealthy perception that every delicious bite was not-so-slowly killing you. They took “fried” right out of the title, kept the Colonel’s famous recipe, and reaped healthy profits.Brilliant.The NRA has employed similar tactics. By getting ahead of the public conversation, they are able to shape the discourse away from the horror of children being brutally murdered in their primary-colored classrooms with slogans like “The only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun.” It’s so catchy that even as it’s proven false, over and over again, shamefully and needlessly, it gets repeated.They have doubled down on the pro-gun rhetoric in the wake of the Isla Vista mass killing that left a young Christopher Martinez, and six others including the shooter, dead. Martinez’s father Richard has brought a media blitz to his cause with his simple plea of #notonemore.It’s a straightforward appeal for rational thinking about guns. He implores the people of this nation to consider the rights of those to live above those who believe it is their right to shoot. It is a father’s plea, absent of political speech.Which is why, I suppose, I reacted so strongly to a Salon article I read recently, which discussed how media outlets are redefining what they consider to be school shootings.The crux of the controversy is the Michael Bloomberg gun control group “Everytown for Gun Safety” that has been compiling school shooting data since the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary. Some of that data has come under fire as stretching what constitutes as a “school shooting,” such as suicides or gang activity or after-hours gun deaths. These incidents don’t fit the profile of what’s been commonly accepted as a school shooting. CNN, and others, have taken umbrage to this.I take umbrage to their taking umbrage. Because what we have here is not a numbers game, or a policy issue, or even politics. It’s not about the accuracy of reporting, it’s about syntax. It’s about the vernacular. It’s about saying that people getting shot nearly every day in this violent country isn’t as important as how we define it. It’s about diverting the conversation from the personal horrors that plague us as a country to rhetoric, removing us, bit by bit, from the actuality of the bloodshed.And it works.So instead of a lengthy op-ed on the merits or weaknesses of this argument, I say we go another way. Meet it head on. With a tiny detour.If we are to redefine “school shootings,” I think definitions are fair game. Let’s call things what they are. Let’s lay it all out on the table.Here are two definitions:1. the use of violence and threats to intimidate or coerce, especially for political purposes.2. a person who tries to influence legislation on behalf of a special interest.These two definitions come from different places, yet both have similar aims. The second one, however, does not count among it terrifying the population in order to achieve their political means. And that’s what the NRA does. By instilling fear in the public that more and more weaponry is needed to protect ourselves from outside threats, they do more than inflate their bottom line: they redefine how our lives are led. They change the culture.Words are powerful enough to influence radical changes. Gun owners are now storming Targets, Chipotle, and Starbucks in Texas, citing the open-carry mantra “a right unexercised is a right lost.”The right they refer to—gun ownership, open-carry laws and unclosed loopholes that allow nearly anyone to purchase any type of weaponry undetected in some states—are fed by fear instilled by genius marketers who sell the public on the idea that they are constantly being threatened. This notion directly lines the pockets of the NRA, who, in turn, uses those funds to influence legislation on behalf of their interest.That second part is from the latter definition of a lobbyist. But the manner in which they do so comes directly from the first. And if we’re calling it like it is, it’s time we incorporate that into our understanding of what the NRA is. The full picture includes the first part, which is the definition of a terrorist group.I think Richard Martinez would agree.last_img read more

Read More →