UK roundup: Tesco Pension Scheme, Makro Staff Pension Scheme, Rothesay Life

first_imgThe £8bn (€10bn) Tesco Pension Scheme has completed the purchase of a shopping centre in the town of Lincoln for £46m.Located in the heart of Lincoln, in the east of England, the centre was purchased from asset manager Capital & Regional as part of the scheme’s growing real estate portfolio.The manager recently invested in redeveloping the shopping centre before handing over the reins to the Tesco scheme, itself a large supermarket chain.The pension fund allocates roughly 10% of its assets to real estate and manages the UK portfolio of assets in-house. In an interview with IPE in September, CIO Steven Daniels said the fund liked retail exposure in its real estate holdings, as they offered long-term lease agreements, highly rated tenants and inflation-linked rental income.He said the index-linkage allowed the fund to match pension increases and avoid the use of derivative-based hedging instruments.In 2013, the pension fund supported a new office development in Cambridge, investing £32m in construction costs and pre-letting 90% of the office space.In other news, the Makro Staff Pension Scheme has completed a £185m insurance buy-in arrangement with Rothesay Life.The deal, adding to 2014’s already booming insurance bulk annuity market, covered a significant majority of the scheme’s liabilities.Makro, originally a Dutch chain of warehouse stores for a range of goods, sold its UK business to rival outlet Brooker Group in 2012.At the end of 2011, it closed the defined benefit scheme to new members and future accrual, with the view to insuring remaining participants.As a general rule, insurance buy-ins are arranged to cover pensioner members and act as an asset held by the scheme, while the insurance company makes regular payments covering pensions.Consultancy LCP advised on the transaction while Pinsent Mason provided legal advice.Emma Watkins, partner at LCP, said covering both pensioner members deferred members added additional complexities to the deal.“[The deal showed the] determination on the part of the trustee and the company to get to this position,” she said.“It also shows how well-prepared trustees and sponsors who respond quickly when opportunities arise can take advantage of favourable market conditions and competitive pricing.”LCP recently predicted the UK bulk annuity market would regularly exceed £10bn in deals each year, as the funding positions of UK schemes improves.last_img read more

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Gold Coasters are paying some of the highest prices for rent in Queensland

first_imgIt’s probably better to buy property on the Gold Coast…“Median rents for many types of dwellings have trended upwards for the past year as many rental properties are being sold to owner-occupiers. “Vacancies sit within the tight range at 1.7 per cent despite the perceived fall in rental demand following the completion of the Commonwealth Games.”She said Broadbeach and Mermaid Beach were the most expensive suburbs to rent three-bedroom houses and townhouses, with median rents of $610 and $595 a week respectively in the September quarter. Gold Coast tenants are forking out some of the highest prices for rent in Queensland.GOLD Coast tenants are forking out some of the highest prices for rent in Queensland despite property experts predicting demand would drop following the Commonwealth Games.The news was revealed in the latest REIQ Quarterly Market Monitor Report, which was released at the weekend.REIQ chief executive Antonia Mercorella said the Coast remained the most expensive rental market for three-bedroom houses and two-bedroom units, with median rents of $500 and $430 a week respectively.“The rental market continues performing strongly,” she said.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa13 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days ago Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:38Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:38 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD576p576p432p432p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow to split your rental costs fairly00:39last_img read more

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No longer taboo, but divorce still damages children

first_imgMailOnline 7 Nov 2012Family breakdown is as devastating for  today’s children as it was when divorce was a source of social disgrace, a  state-backed report warned yesterday. Even though divorce is no longer considered ‘shameful’ – as it was until the 1970s – the children of broken families  continue to suffer destructive effects throughout their lives, the report  said. The paper, produced by a team of senior  academics, found that the damage caused to a child by divorce continues to  blight his or her life as far as old age. It said parental separation in childhood was ‘consistently associated with psychological distress in adulthood during  people’s early 30s’. The report added: ‘This seems to be true even  across different generations, which suggests that as divorce and separation have  become more common, their impact on mental health has not reduced.’‘Family life has undergone dramatic changes  over recent decades,’ the report, produced by a team led by Professor Mel  Bartley, said. ‘Families no longer have to have two parents,  they can contain children from different parents, and parents no longer have to  be of different genders.’ But it warned: ‘More freedom also means less  certainty, and this has led to concerns about the impact of family stability on  the health and well-being of both children and adults. ‘Family living arrangements are related to  children’s physical health. ‘Children whose parents remain married  throughout the early childhood years are less likely to suffer from breathing  problems such as asthma, to become overweight, or to be injured in accidents by  the time they are five years old than children who have experienced a more  unstable family situation.’The research was based on the large-scale  British Cohort Studies, which cover people born in 1946, 1958, 1970, and, most  recently, in the 2000 Millennium Study. ESRC academics also took into account a  series of independent smaller-scale projects.http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2228987/No-longer-taboo-divorce-damages-children-Suffering-goes-adulthood-old-age.htmllast_img read more

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UPDATED: Mindfulness in Schools

first_imgWe’ve been contacted by a number of parents concerned about a new programme called ‘Mindfulness’ which is being trialled in a number of schools around NZ.You can read more about the concerns expressed about the programme HERE (Investigate) and HERE (Southland Times) and HERE “The Messy Truth about Mindfulness“. To be fair, there are also complements for the programme HERE (NZ Herald). There is very little research on the effectiveness of the programme in a classroom setting. One study said “there is no generalised empirical evidence of the efficacy of these interventions.”We also received an excellent review of the programme by a concerned parent who sat in on one of the ‘classes’. READ HEREWhat is significant is that this programme is being pushed in schools at the same time as Bible-in-schools comes under attack by small groups such as the Secular Education Network – and these same groups suddenly go quiet. It’s called ‘selective offence’ – or hypocrisy!We also note that the Australian government has just released a major review of the education curriculum, calling for teachers to go ‘back to basics’ on grammar, punctuation and reading. It also says that western civilisation is being demonised in schools. But here’s the best bit –“History should be revised in order to properly recognise the impact and significance of Australia’s Judaeo-Christian heritage.’’The purpose of this email is simply to remind you of your rights as a parent which we would encourage you to exercise if you wish to. Do not allow the school to fob you off. Are you aware whether this programme is operating in your school?The EDUCATION ACT 1989 says:Section 25A Release from tuition on religious or cultural grounds(1) A student aged 16 and above, or the parent of a student aged under 16, may ask the principal to release the student from tuition in a particular class or subject.(1A) A request under subsection (1) must be made in writing, and at least 24 hours before the start of the tuition.(1B) This section applies only to students enrolled at a State school that is not an integrated school.(2) Unless satisfied that—(a) the parent or student (as the case may be) has asked because of sincerely held religious or cultural views; and(b) the student will be adequately supervised (whether within or outside the school) during the tuition,—the principal shall not release the student.Note that the right applies based on the views of the family – irrespective of what the Ministry of Education may try and label the programme as. It applies to any class or subject which conflicts with your ‘sincerely held religious or cultural view’.The HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION report “Religion in NZ Schools” says:What does the Education Act say about religion in state primary schools? The effect of the Education Act 1964 is that schools do not have to provide religious instruction or observance, but they are permitted to do so under certain conditions. Whether a school includes religion in the day-to-day life of the school or not is up to the school’s Board of Trustees. If a school does provide religious instruction or observe religious customs it must be done in a way that allows students to opt out freely if they want to.• Section 79 allows children to opt out if their parents do not wish them to participate in religious ceremonies or teaching.We would encourage parents to exercise their right to withdraw their child/ren from the programme if they are concerned about the “Mindfulness” programme and the way it is operated in the school, in the same way that we would encourage parents to exercise the same right when groups like Family Planning and Rainbow Youth come in to schools with their dangerous and misleading sex education messages. More information on parents’ rights are on our website HEREPlease remember – it is parents and families, not the schools or the State, who are the Gatekeepers of our children’s minds and hearts.FURTHER READINGThe Messy Truth About MindfulnessWilloughby Britton: Mindful.orgWilloughby Britton is Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Brown University Medical School. She has also been a committed mindfulness practitioner for 20 years. Mindful met up with Britton after the Center for Mindfulness Retreat in Boston in the spring to talk about the theory and practice of mindfulness.Britton’s research is often quoted by traditional media. Here she is, in her own words, talking about some of the messy truths about mindfulness.Meditation is not all peace and calm. Sometimes stuff can come up that needs to be dealt with. Meditation is not the “warm bath” it’s been marketed as in this country, Britton says.“A lot of psychological material is going to come up and be processed. Old resentments, wounds, that kind of thing,” says Britton, “But also some traumatic material if people have a trauma history, it can come up and need additional support or even therapy.” Some of Britton’s research is making headway into understanding “difficult or challenging mind states” among advanced meditators and scholars that can occur as a result of intensive meditation practice.When Britton is approached by educators who want to bring mindfulness to their schools, she attaches a warning: “Be prepared to be wildly successful.” Britton says she’s seen students at Brown get so excited that they spend their summer meditating in the forest, 12 hours a day.“[Meditation leaders] should take responsibility for that and make sure students have some supervision,” she says.http://www.mindful.org/mindfulness-practice/willoughby-britton-the-messy-truth-about-mindfulnessIs mindfulness making us ill?The Guardian (UK) 23 Jan 2016….A 1992 study by David Shapiro, a professor at the University of California, Irvine, found that 63% of the group studied, who had varying degrees of experience in meditation and had each tried mindfulness, had suffered at least one negative effect from meditation retreats, while 7% reported profoundly adverse effects including panic, depression, pain and anxiety. Shapiro’s study was small-scale; several research papers, including a 2011 study by Duke University in North Carolina, have raised concerns at the lack of quality research on the impact of mindfulness, specifically the lack of controlled studies.Research suggests her experience might not be unique. Internet forums abound with people seeking advice after experiencing panic attacks, hearing voices or finding that meditation has deepened their depression after some initial respite. In their recent book, The Buddha Pill, psychologists Miguel Farias and Catherine Wikholm voice concern about the lack of research into the adverse effects of meditation and the “dark side” of mindfulness. “Since the book’s been published, we’ve had a number of emails from people wanting to tell us about adverse effects they have experienced,” Wikholm says. “Often, people have thought they were alone with this, or they blamed themselves, thinking they somehow did it wrong, when actually it doesn’t seem it’s all that uncommon.”Farias feels that media coverage inflates the moderate positive effects of mindfulness, and either doesn’t report or underplays the downsides. “Mindfulness can have negative effects for some people, even if you’re doing it for only 20 minutes a day,” Farias says. “It’s difficult to tell how common [negative] experiences are, because mindfulness researchers have failed to measure them, and may even have discouraged participants from reporting them by attributing the blame to them.”…. There is currently no professionally accredited training for mindfulness teachers, and nothing to stop anyone calling themselves a mindfulness coach, though advocates are calling for that to change. Finding an experienced teacher who comes recommended, and not being afraid to discuss negative side-effects with your teacher or GP, means you’re far more likely to enjoy and benefit from the experience.http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2016/jan/23/is-mindfulness-making-us-illMindfulness can cause panic, depression and anxiety, participants reportChristian Concern 29 January 2016Mindfulness is increasingly becoming the relaxation method of choice, used not only by individuals but by employers and health services. Despite claims that the practice, which involves being still and focusing on one’s breathing and thoughts, can help to tackle stress and depression, critics have attested to its negative effects – suggesting that it is not simply a harmless way to unwind.Dr Peter Jones of truthXchange has spoken about the Buddhist roots of mindfulness, explaining that the process of meditation, which effectively silences the conscience, actually creates a mindset “very opposite to the Christian faith”.Studies have also shown that mindfulness can cause adverse effects. In 1992, one researcher, David Shapiro of the University of California, Irvine, found that 7% of those who practiced mindfulness experienced serious negative reactions, such as panic and depression. Several people have described their personal negative experiences of mindfulness, reporting these same feelings of panic, depression and anxiety.READ MOREMindfulness may not be doing you goodThe Conversation 5 June 2015Mindfulness as a psychological aid is very much in fashion. Recent reports on the latest finding suggested that mindfulness-based cognitive therapy is as effective as anti-depressants in preventing the relapse of recurrent depression.While the authors of the paper interpreted their results in a slightly less positive light, stating that (contrary to their hypothesis) mindfulness was no more effective than medication, the meaning inferred by many in the media was that mindfulness was superior to medication.Mindfulness is a technique extracted from Buddhism where one tries to notice present thoughts, feeling and sensations without judgement. The aim is to create a state of “bare awareness”. What was once a tool for spiritual exploration has been turned into a panacea for the modern age — a cure-all for common human problems, from stress, to anxiety, to depression. By taking this “natural pill” every day, we open ourselves up to the potential for myriad benefits and no ill-effects, unlike synthetic pills, such as anti-depressants, whose potential for negative side-effects we are all aware of.Side effectsMindfulness is presented as a technique that will have lots of positive effects – and only positive effects. It is easy to see why this myth is so widespread. After all, sitting in silence, focusing on your breathing or being aware of the flow of thoughts and feelings would seem like a fairly innocuous activity with little potential for harm.But considering that many of us rarely sit alone with our thoughts, it isn’t hard to see how this might lead to difficult thoughts and emotions rising to the surface for some people – which we may, or may not, be equipped to deal with. Yet the potential for emotional and psychological disturbance is rarely talked about by mindfulness researchers, the media, or mentioned in training courses.And here we come to an important point. Buddhist meditation was designed not to make us happier, but to radically change our sense of self and perception of the world. Given this, it is perhaps not surprising that some will experience negative effects such as dissociation, anxiety and depression. However, like the small print on medication, these “side-effects” in some individuals are not what the creators of this pill are concerned with promoting.For some, penicillin is life saving; for others, it induces a harmful reaction. Just because your friend or family member responds to a pill a certain way, does not mean you will respond in the same way. The same is also true with mindfulness: for some, it may be very effective or it may not work at all, for others, there may be harmful effects.Mindfulness has been separated from its roots, stripped of its ethical and spiritual connotations, and sold to us as a therapeutic tool. While this may not deny its power as a technique to change our state of consciousness and with implications for mental health, it arguably limits its “naturalness”, as well as its potential – at least as originally intended.Many Buddhists are critical of the use of mindfulness for purposes which are very different from the radical shift in perception they aim for — the realisation of “emptiness” and liberation from all attachments. Instead, as Giles Coren recently claimed, this technique has been turned into a McMindfulness which only reinforces one’s egocentric drives.The idea that each of us is unique is a cornerstone of individual-based therapy. But with mindfulness-based approaches there is little space for one’s individuality, in part because it’s a group practice, but also because there has been no serious attempt to address how individuals react differently to this technique.So if you go into it – as with taking any other kind of pill – keep your eyes open. Don’t consume mindfulness blindly.http://theconversation.com/mindfulness-has-lost-its-buddhist-roots-and-it-may-not-be-doing-you-good-42526Panic, depression and stress: The case against meditationNewScientist 14 May 2015Twitching, trembling, panic, disorientation, hallucinations, terror, depression, mania and psychotic breakdown – these are some of the reported effects of meditation. Surprised? We were too.Techniques such as transcendental meditation and mindfulness are promoted as ways of quieting the mind, alleviating pain and anxiety, and even transforming you into a happier and more compassionate person: natural cure-alls without adverse effects. But happiness and de-stressing were not what meditation techniques, with their Buddhist and Hindu roots, were originally developed for. The purpose of meditation was much more radical: to challenge and rupture the idea of who you are, shaking one’s sense of self to the core so you realise there is “nothing there” (Buddhism) or no real differentiation between you and the rest of the universe (Hinduism). So perhaps it is not so surprising that these practices have downsides. http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22630210.500-panic-depression-and-stress-the-case-against-meditation.htmlMindfulness – Treatment can trigger mania, depression and psychosisMailOnline 22 May 2015Meditation and mindfulness is promoted by celebrities including Gwyneth Paltrow and Russell Brand, who boast of its power to help people put stress out of their minds and live for the moment. But the treatment can itself trigger mania, depression, hallucinations and psychosis, psychological studies in the UK and US have found. The practice is part of a growing movement based on ancient Eastern traditions of meditation.However, 60 per cent of people who had been on a meditation retreat had suffered at least one negative side effect, including panic, depression and confusion, a study in the US found. And one in 14 of them suffered ‘profoundly adverse effects’, according to Miguel Farias, head of the brain, belief and behaviour research group at Coventry University and Catherine Wikholm, a researcher in clinical psychology at the University of Surrey.The shortage of rigorous statistical studies into the negative effects of meditation was a ‘scandal’, Dr Farias told The Times. He said: ‘The assumption of the majority of both TM [transcendental meditation] and mindfulness researchers is that meditation can only do one good.http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-3092572/The-dark-meditation-mindfulness-Treatment-trigger-mania-depression-psychosis-new-book-claims.htmlThe Mindfulness BacklashNew York Times 30 June 2014Mindfulness has reached such a level of hipness that it is now suggested as a cure for essentially every ailment. Anxious? Broke? Sneezing? Definitely try meditating.This vogue is in part due to the real benefits of mindfulness, a form of attention and awareness often (but not always) achieved through meditation or yoga. It’s a trend for a reason. But its increasing application to every situation under the sun has some people concerned.In The Atlantic, Tomas Rocha writes about the little-discussed possibility that, for some people, meditation could actually be dangerous. He talks to Dr. Willoughby Britton, a professor of psychiatry and human behavior who works with people who feel they’ve been harmed by meditation — one man described going through “psychological hell” as a result of his practice, while another worried he was “permanently ruined.” Dr. Britton has tracked “dark nights of the soul” — spiritual experiences that are frightening rather than calming — across a variety of religious texts, and she believes that meditation’s potential ill effects have been under-studied. Mr. Rocha writes:“Many people think of meditation only from the perspective of reducing stress and enhancing executive skills such as emotion regulation, attention, and so on. “For Britton, this widespread assumption — that meditation exists only for stress reduction and labor productivity, ‘because that’s what Americans value’ — narrows the scope of the scientific lens. When the time comes to develop hypotheses around the effects of meditation, the only acceptable — and fundable — research questions are the ones that promise to deliver the answers we want to hear.”http://op-talk.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/06/30/the-mindfulness-backlash/?_r=0Mindfulness backlash: Could meditation be bad for your health?The Telegraph 24 October 2015Convinced by studies (such as that by Oxford University in 2014, which found the technique can reduce depression relapses by 44 per cent), the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) now recommends mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for depression.The Mental Health Foundation estimates that 30 per cent of GPs refer patients with mental health issues for mindfulness-based treatment. Persuaded by claims of stress reduction and increased mental clarity, mindfulness has been eagerly adopted by huge companies including Google, Apple, Sony, Ikea and the Department of Health. Mindfulness-based anger management is offered to inmates in prison, and there are calls for mindfulness training to become mandatory in schools.“A good teacher will help you make sense of what emerges through meditation.” Dr Tamara Russell, founder of The Mindfulness Centre of Excellence.“Beneficial findings are overstated in some media reports, whereas studies without the expected results go under the radar. This leads to a skewed picture, wherein the enthusiasm may be ahead of the evidence. Currently, with mindfulness, the evidence is not necessarily consistent or conclusive.” When Farias and Wikholm began researching The Buddha Pill, they were astonished at the paucity of solid studies on the benefits. Then their own research threw up surprising evidence that mindfulness has a range of outcomes – not all positive.“To some, this will be blissful relaxation, but for others the outcome will be emotional distress, hallucinations or perhaps even ending up in a psychiatric ward,” says Farias. “David Shapiro of the University of California, Irvine, found that seven per cent of people on meditation retreats experienced profoundly adverse effects, including panic and depression.”  Psychologists Miguel Farias and Catherine Wikholm, co-authors of The Buddha Pill: Can Meditation Change You?“Mindfulness and meditation are bad for people. People should be thinking… Life is about going out there and meeting people and hearing their thoughts.”  Oxford University professor Theodore Zeldinhttp://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/womens-life/11942320/Mindfulness-backlash-Meditation-bad-for-your-health.htmlThe Dark Knight of the SoulThe Atlantic 24 June 2014In late January this year, Time magazine featured a cover story on “the mindful revolution,” an account of the extent to which mindfulness meditation has diffused into the largest sectors of modern society. Used by “Silicon Valley entrepreneurs, Fortune 500 titans, Pentagon chiefs, and more,” mindfulness meditation is promoted as a means to help Americans work mindfully, eat mindfully, parent mindfully, teach mindfully, take standardized tests mindfully, spend money mindfully, and go to war mindfully. What the cover story did not address are what might be called the revolution’s “dirty laundry.”“We’re not being thorough or honest in our study of contemplative practice,” says Britton.http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/06/the-dark-knight-of-the-souls/372766/The Effectiveness of Mindfulness Training for Children with ADHD and Mindful Parenting for their ParentsJournal of Child and Family Studies Feb 2011This study evaluated the effectiveness of an 8-week mindfulness training for children aged 8–12 with ADHD and parallel mindful parenting training for their parents. Parents (N = 22) completed questionnaires on their child’s ADHD and ODD symptoms, their own ADHD symptoms, parenting stress, parental over-reactivity, permissiveness and mindful awareness before, immediately after the 8-week training and at 8-week follow-up. Teachers reported on ADHD and ODD behaviour of the child. A within-group waitlist was used to control for the effects of time and repeated measurement. Training was delivered in group format. There were no significant changes between wait-list and pre-test, except on the increase of teacher-rated ODD behaviour. There was a significant reduction of parent-rated ADHD behaviour of themselves and their child from pre-to post-test and from pre- to follow-up test. Further, there was a significant increase of mindful awareness from pre-to post-test and a significant reduction of parental stress and over-reactivity from pre-to follow-up test. Teacher-ratings showed non-significant effects. Our study shows preliminary evidence for the effectiveness of mindfulness for children with ADHD and their parents, as rated by parents. However, in the absence of substantial effects on teacher-ratings, we cannot ascertain effects are due to specific treatment procedures. (our emphasis added)http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3267931/ FURTHER READING: Parental Rights in NZ Regarding “Mindfulness”https://www.familyfirst.org.nz/2014/10/parental-rights-regarding-mindfulness/last_img read more

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Martinelli refutes exit talk with firm message to Arteta

first_img Loading… Martinelli has scored 10 goals in 26 appearances for the Gunners this season since his £7million move from Ituano in his homeland in the summer. The 18-year-old’s tremendous pace, prolific scoring and impressive displays are said to have alerted the likes of La Liga giants Real, with a report in January claiming they were ready to pay £50million to bring him to the Bernabeu. But Arsenal are in no hurry to sell, especially amid ongoing claims that Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang could be on the move, with Martinelli contracted to the Gunners until 2024, and set to be offered a pay rise from £10,000 a week to around £30,000 per week. And now Martinelli himself has come out and admitted he foresees a long and successful career for himself at Arsenal and is determined to make himself a club legend at Emirates Stadium. “I want to win the Champions League and lots of domestic titles to make Arsenal’s fans very happy,” the Brazilian revealed to FourFourTwo. “They deserve the best – not only the supporters but all of the club’s staff. I’d like to give back to the club after everything they’ve done for me so far and, as a result, become a Gunners legend.” Although Martinelli did not get chance to work for long under Unai Emery, the man who brought him to Emirates Stadium, the teenage striker – labelled the ‘Talent of the Century’ by Jurgen Klopp – admits he owes plenty to the Spaniard for putting his trust in him. Emery has since been replaced by another Spaniard in Mikel Arteta and Martinelli is impressed by his new manager’s keen eye for detail and his calm personna. “He’s been brilliant,” the Brazilian added. “He pays a lot of attention to moves and keeps pushing me to improve my game; not only in attack but defence, too. “The boss is very wise tactically and incredibly helpful. He’s not an angry guy at all, but likes showing you exactly what to do on the pitch: ‘If the ball goes that way, don’t stay here, go there and turn your body that specific way. He has a keen eye for detail.” Read Also:Arsenal boss: I’ve recovered; I feel well Meanwhile, former Arsenal midfielder Cesc Fabregas has opened up on his relationship with Arsene Wenger and his surprise at being snubbed by the Gunners after returning to England from Barcelona. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Promoted ContentWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?10 Hyper-Realistic 3D Street Art By Odeith6 Incredibly Strange Facts About HurricanesCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way7 Mind-Boggling Facts About Black HolesBest Car Manufacturers In The WorldThe Highest Paid Football Players In The WorldThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read More6 Stunning Bridges You’ll Want To See With Your Own Eyes8 Amazing Movies You Need To Watch On Amazon PrimeWhat Are The Most Delicious Foods Out There?10 Completely Unexpected Facts About The US President’s Daughter Gabriel Martinelli is paying no attention to reports he is wanted by the likes of Real Madrid and instead, the young Brazilian has designs on turning Arsenal into future Champions League winners.last_img read more

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Atletico Madrid reject Juventus €50m bid for Spanish striker

first_img Promoted ContentCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable WayTime Playing Video Games Can Have A Detrimental Effect On You5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksDiscover How Women From Famous Paintings Looked Like In Real Life11 Most Immersive Game To Play On Your Table Top7 Universities Where Getting An Education Costs A Hefty PennyA Hurricane Can Be As Powerful As 10 Atomic Bombs10 Most Praised Historical MoviesTop 10 Most Romantic Nations In The World5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksFrom Enemies To Friends: 10 TV Characters Who Became Close10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do It follows a report that Juventus want Morata with their new boss Andrea Pirlo – a former teammate of the Spaniard – keen to push for a deal. However, the striker has a €150m release clause and it does not appear that the club are in any mood to negotiate down on that. The striker previously spent two years in Italy with the Bianconeri – where he scored 15 goals in 63 games, helping them to two league titles and the 2015 Champions League final. Juve have been heavily linked with a move for Barcelona striker Luis Suarez, and it now appears they have made the former Chelsea striker an alternative. La Liga campaigners Atletico Madrid have rejected an offer of €50m from Juventus to sign striker Alvaro Morata, according to Marca. Remarkably, this opening offer from the Bianconeri is lower than the fee Atleti paid Chelsea (€55m) for the striker, whose move was only made permanent this summer following an 18-month loan stint. Morata – whose wife is Italian – is said to have been frustrated at Atleti in recent months and particularly when Simeone opted to play Diego Costa ahead of him on several occasions near the end of last season. Indeed, after football resumed in June, Morata only started six of 12 matches for Los Rojiblancos and was a substitute in the Champions League defeat to RB Leipzig.Advertisement Read Also: Lionel Messi gifts blind boy life-changing glassesThe 27-year old has struggled for consistency with Diego Simeone’s side since his return to the Spanish capital in 2018, however 12 league goals last season may have handed him a second chance in Simeone’s plans at the Wanda Metropolitano.Despite Juve’s attempts to sign the player this summer, the economic reality of Covid-19, coupled with Atleti’s unwillingness to sell, makes any deal unlikely.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… last_img read more

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EPL: Chelsea, Liverpool rumble in London

first_imgRelatedPosts Neuer crowned Player of the Month for August Budapest to host Bayern-Sevilla Super Cup final Neymar reflects on Champions League defeat Chelsea vs. LiverpoolVenue: Stamford BridgeKick off: 4:30PMOne of the standout fixtures of any Premier League season takes place today when Chelsea welcome league leaders Liverpool to Stamford Bridge.Both sides suffered defeats in the Champions League during the week and will be looking to return to winning ways domestically in what has all the makings of a goal-laden contest – as it was when the two sides went to penalties in the UEFA Super Cup last month.Frank Lampard was part of the Chelsea team for many a memorable battle against Liverpool, although the balance of power has switched slightly since his playing heyday.Whereas the Blues used to be the dominant force in English football while Liverpool were battling for a top-four spot, the roles have now been reversed with Chelsea coming into this match already seven points adrift of their opponents.There was always going to be an asterisk next to this season for Chelsea; a first campaign under Lampard has coincided with a transfer ban which has subsequently forced the club to finally tap into their sizeable pool of young talent.So far, it seems to have been a blessing in disguise. All 11 of their Premier League goals this season have been scored by English players aged 21 or younger – the first time that has ever happened – while Fikayo Tomori, Mason Mount and Tammy Abraham were all on the scoresheet last time out in the league.Tomori may have produced the goal of that particular game, but Abraham was once again the star of the show as Chelsea made light work of a difficult-looking assignment by beating Wolverhampton Wanderers 5-2 at Molineux.It continued an entertaining start to the season for Chelsea, whose games have seen a league-high 22 goals so far, although the fact that those have been evenly shared between goals scored and conceded will be a concern.It was a Liverpool legend who once said that “you can’t win anything with kids” and, while Alan Hansen may have been proved wrong on that occasion, the early signs certainly suggest that Chelsea are lacking the balance to truly trouble the main title contenders over the course of a 38-game season.Throwing away a two-goal lead against Sheffield United in their most recent home league game is perhaps the best example of that so far, and even their scoring touch deserted them at Stamford Bridge on Tuesday night.Lampard’s managerial debut in the Champions League ended in a 1-0 defeat at the hands of Valencia, although the Blues could have come away with a point had Ross Barkley converted his penalty rather than putting it over via the top of the crossbar.The result means that Chelsea are still winless at home under their former talisman, although in the Premier League they remain unbeaten there in 2019.However, there were concerns in the Liverpool camp that it may take a while for them to get going this season considering their disrupted pre-season and the likes of Mohamed Salah, Sadio Mane and Roberto Firmino all being involved in international tournaments during the summer.The reality could not be further from the truth, though. Jurgen Klopp’s side have won five from five in the league so far this term, storming into a five-point lead and taking full advantage of Manchester City’s unexpected dropped points.Such form has picked up exactly where it left off last season, and the Reds have now won a club-record 14 games in a row in the top flight. Indeed, they are the first team in English top-flight history to ever achieve that feat while scoring more than one goal in each of the victories.Another triumph this afternoon would leave only Pep Guardiola’s Man City with a longer run of wins in Premier League history (18), although Liverpool’s momentum was halted somewhat with a midweek defeat in Naples.The Reds held their own for long spells in the opening match of their Champions League title defence, but two late Napoli goals saw them fall to defeat at the Stadio San Paolo for the second successive season.It did not hamper them too much last term as they went on to lift the trophy in Madrid, of course, but a hiccup in a winning habit is never a good thing and Klopp will be desperate to avoid any hangover today. Chelsea possible XI: Kepa, Azpilicueta, Christensen, Tomori, Alonso, Barkley, Jorginho, Kovacic, Pulisic, Abraham, Willian.Liverpool possible XI: Adrian, Alexander-Arnold, Matip, Van Dijk, Robertson, Henderson, Fabinho, Wijnaldum, Salah, Firmino, Mane.Tags: Champions Leaguelast_img read more

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Pochettino’s sticking with Saints

first_img Press Association Mauricio Pochettino has confirmed he will be staying with Southampton as manager. The Argentinian’s future has been cast into the spotlight after the resignation of executive chairman and close ally Nicola Cortese. He left the club on Wednesday and, with Pochettino having previously said he would leave if Cortese did, it remained to be seen if he could carry out his threat. But Pochettino faced the media on Thursday afternoon and claimed a change in situation meant he would not be leaving. “I want to show my gratitude to Nicola Cortese. I believed in him, he brought me here, my staff and my family. I am full of gratitude to him,” he said. “Eight months ago when this happened we were finishing my first season and I did say that if he left there would be no sense for me to stay. “The new situation is different. We are in the middle of our new project. Nicola knows of my decision to stay; I have spoken to him. I am fully committed to the staff, the players, the club and it would make no sense to leave in the middle of our path.” The Barclays Premier League outfit announced in a statement on Wednesday night that Cortese’s resignation had been accepted and that their owner Katharina Liebherr had taken on the role of non-executive chairman, with the search having begun for a new chief executive officer. Cortese’s departure has thrown the future of stars like Luke Shaw into doubt. But Pochettino vowed no player will leave the club during the January transfer window without his authority. “I want to make one thing clear: no-one is for sale at Southampton, no-one,” he said. “And I believe the same thing. No player that I don’t want to leave will leave this club.” Pochettino said he wants to honour the remaining 17 months of his Southampton contract, although he admitted it is too soon to say for sure at this point whether that will happen. “It’s very hard to say at the moment, I think it’s very soon to say about that,” said Pochettino. “But when I signed with Nicola, and we signed a number of players, I’m 100 per cent committed to the two years of my contract and I’m 100 per cent committed to those players. “I have a contract and a responsibility to that.” Pochettino said new chairman Liebherr has given him and his staff her full backing. The 41-year-old said he expects Liebherr to appoint someone to handle transfers specifically, as she searches for a chief executive officer to replace Cortese. “I met her for five minutes today,” Pochettino said. “She told me we have her full support, she wants the club to be stable, and that we need to look forward to the future. “It’s still too soon to talk about this (who deals with transfers), we will see in the future how the tasks are unfolded at this club, who does what at this club. “I’m sure the club will designate a person to speak to about all of that.” Revealing Cortese backed his decision to stay at the club, Pochettino said he does not know exactly why the executive chairman resigned. “What’s quite clear is I have a very good relationship with Nicola Cortese,” he said. “He agrees with my decision to stay and there’s nothing more I can say about that right now. “He only asked me for one thing and that’s to try to win on Saturday. “I don’t know (why he decided to leave), it’s quite difficult to say, I found out yesterday as you did about his decision. “Of course it has surprised me quite a bit, the same as the people involved with this club, and I knew nothing about his departure.” Manchester City are among clubs being linked with a big-money offer for teenage defender Shaw. But Pochettino said he is not aware of any official bids. He added: “It’s clear that Luke Shaw has a contract, and that’s a question for the new chairman.” last_img read more

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Advocaat: Black Cats will improve

first_imgSunderland manager Dick Advocaat has promised his under-fire players will do what it takes to win over the club’s fans at the Stadium of Light on Saturday against Swansea. Advocaat described his side’s form as “frightening” after the latest disappointment against Norwich and held clear-the-air talks on Sunday with his players, who held a further meeting of their own later in the week. “After the game we always have training and a meeting. This time it took a bit longer because the players could also say something,” he said. “During the week they had a meeting with only the players, but it’s only positive. “I understand a little bit the (media) comments and the articles, but normally the panic starts in March or April, but it seems to have started now and that’s quite early.” Advocaat confirmed summer signing Younes Kaboul will play no part against Swansea due to a knee injury, while Spanish midfielder Jordi Gomez remains sidelined with a similar problem. Fans have called on club chairman Ellis Short to invest heavily in the squad during the last two weeks of the summer transfer window. Former Belgium and Holland coach Advocaat admitted his current squad could only hope to avoid relegation without the addition of some high-quality new signings, but he remains hopeful of boosting his options before the transfer window closes. “One thing that I can say, which is 100 per cent, is we will become a better team,” Advocaat said. “There is no doubt about that. Dutchman Advocaat, 67, has watched his side capitulate in their opening two Barclays Premier League matches this season with inept displays throughout his line-up being met with furious criticism . Former defender Michael Gray, working for local radio, delivered a withering verdict after last week’s 3-1 home defeat to Norwich, while Match of the Day pundit Alan Shearer – a Newcastle favourite – has claimed the Black Cats are already “doomed”. “Maybe we need a little more time than others but you will see that we can only improve. “Some teams maybe are already at the top, but we are not. “That is an element that we have discussed. This team has to go to the edge, fighting-wise, spirit-wise and we did not do that. “If you don’t do that, the players miss a lot and they understand totally that we have to fight from the first minute to the last minute to get a result, but also to get our fans behind us. “We will do that on Saturday, there is no doubt about that.” Sunderland have been linked with a season-long loan bid for Napoli’s former Swansea midfielder Jonathan de Guzman and Utrecht striker Sebastien Haller, but Advocaat refused to discuss specific targets. “So far we are still working on it (bringing new players in), but then again they are still playing for another club,” he added. “They are not playing for us, you’ll have to wait and see. “I have never mentioned names or positions. It is the media who is doing that.” Press Associationlast_img read more

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Shafer calls Thompson another starter on defensive line

first_imgRon Thompson isn’t listed as a starter on Syracuse’s Week 1 depth chart, but head coach Scott Shafer doesn’t see it that way.“He’s going to have a great season, I really believe that,” Shafer said during his Wednesday morning press conference. “I look at Ron Thompson as one of the starters up front.”Recruited as a four-star tight end, Thompson was moved to defensive end after spring practice last year. As the Orange battled through injuries at defensive tackle during training camp as it looked to replace Jay Bromley, Thompson got some reps in the middle of the line and the coaches may end up using him there during the season.“He could play tackle if he had to,” Shafer said. “He’ll be a different type of tackle because of his speed and his quickness when we use him in such a way.”Stepping up in Bromley’s absence will be a committee of defensive tackles, Shafer added later Wednesday morning in the Atlantic Coast Conference coaches’ teleconference.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textJunior Marcus Coleman is ahead of sophomore Isaiah Johnson on the depth chart and Eric Crume is first at nose tackle, but Thompson could very well find himself mixing into that rotation in addition to working off the edge.“There could be occasions where you see two Detroit kids next to each other inside throughout the course of this season, Eric Crume and Ron Thompson,” Shafer said. “And I like that Detroit toughness that they bring to the table.” Comments Published on August 27, 2014 at 11:53 am Contact Phil: pmdabbra@syr.edu | @PhilDAbb Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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