Navy ship makes history after unmanned trip from San Diego to Hawaii

first_img KUSI Newsroom February 18, 2019 KUSI Newsroom, Posted: February 18, 2019 Navy ship makes history after unmanned trip from San Diego to Hawaiicenter_img Updated: 12:29 PM Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter A Navy ship made history after traveling from #SanDiego to Hawaii with no one on board. The Sea Hunter is designed for submarine hunting and counter-mine missions.Details: https://t.co/pMK702Jzqc pic.twitter.com/L7Z2vDOpA2— KUSI News (@KUSINews) February 18, 2019A Navy ship made history after traveling from San Diego to Hawaii with no one on board.The drone-Navy ship known as the Sea Hunter, began its journey last month traveling to Hawaii’s Pearl Harbor.The ship is designed for submarine hunting and counter-mine missions. Crew members on an escort vessel boarded the ship for short durations to check electrical systems, but the ship was unmanned for most of the voyage. last_img read more

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What Was Life Like Beside Bowie New Doc On Guitarist Mick Ronson

first_img New Rock Doc On Bowie Guitarist Mick Ronson what-was-life-beside-bowie-new-doc-guitarist-mick-ronson Email Twitter News What Was Life Like Beside Bowie? New Doc On Guitarist Mick Ronson Facebook Guitar great and David Bowie’s early ’70s musical partner is the subject of a new documentary out this fall Nate HertweckGRAMMYs Aug 31, 2017 – 5:52 pm As of late, more and more compelling music documentaries have been unearthing the stories behind the eras and albums we love. This fall, glam-rock guitar great Mick Ronson’s story gets its own rock doc.Behind Bowie: The Mick Ronson Story follows Ronson’s prolific career from his work with David Bowie as guitarist in the Spiders From Mars to his work with Lou Reed on his 1972 classic album, Transformer, and then with Bob Dylan as part of the Rolling Thunder Review live band in 1975–1976.”I spent a little time with David [Bowie],” Queen drummer Roger Taylor says in the trailer, “and he used to say when I found Mick Ronson, I found my Jeff Beck.”Ronson’s untimely death in 1993 at age 46 came far too soon, and Bowie said of his musical sideman, “If Mick had lived on, he would have become a major producer and arranger, and of course, he would have remained one of rock’s great guitar players.”The film hits select theaters Sept. 1 and home video Oct. 27.Read More: James Murphy On Advice From David Bowie, Being “Done” With Producinglast_img read more

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LT Infotech focuses on hiring in India even as IT firms ramp

first_imgA logo of Larsen and Toubro (L&T) is pictured outside its Corporate office in Mumbai, India May 25, 2016.ReutersEven as numerous major technology conglomerates have been making efforts to hire in the United States, Larsen and Toubro Infotech has said that the firm’s focus remains on India and that is where most of the hiring activity is going to take place.While the firm earlier sent many workers from India to the US on H-1B visas, the firm now plans to hire a few local talents and carry out a majority of work through offshore operations.”This year we have said we will hire around 1,500 freshers and maybe up to 1,000 laterals (both in India and overseas). And I am not going to increase my onsite ratio. So, we will hire some locals for onsite but predominately bulk of the hiring will happen in India,” Sanjay Jalona, CEO at L&T Infotech, told BusinessLine.”So 24 per cent I am saying don’t change the onsite ratio. The same percentage of people will get hired in the US and obviously we want to hire more number of locals. Suppose you are hiring 5 people out of 60 (posted onsite) in the past locally, now you may want to hire 25 people out of 50.”Even though L&T Infotech plans to hire a few locals in the US for onsite operations, the plan may take some time to materialise as Jalona believes that procuring the right kind of talent in the US is not easy. He explained that the firm has been facing issues when it comes to onsite workforce in the US as talent is not readily available. Instead, the firm has been carrying out business through video conferencing. “Using these technologies we do more work even offshore,” Jalona added.Speaking of the change in H-1B visa norms and other government regulations Jalona said that the impact hasn’t been massive yet, but will slowly have an effect. He was, however, thankful that L&T Infotech’s presence is much smaller in the UK due to which Brexit will not have any major effect on the firm.”I think there are a good amount of opportunities. Obviously, the protectionist environment will also come into play both in the US and the UK. Thank god we have small mercies in the Netherlands and France….but otherwise I think its positive overall,” he said. ReutersMeanwhile, numerous IT firms have ramped up hiring in the US after the Donald Trump administration expressed displeasure over US firms outsourcing jobs to other countries. Indian IT giants such as Infosys and Tech Mahindra too have said that they plan to hire a large number of employees in the US.last_img read more

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Jet Airways needs Rs 3500 crore immediately to keep flying Report

first_img Mid-air technical snag forces Etihad flight with 349 people on board to make emergency landing Apart from bloated costs, surging fuel prices and a weaker rupee are hurting Jet Airways. The other reasons cited by senior management in parleys with the staff are an erosion in market share in recent years and the inability to expand into other markets.The rise of Indigo and the launch of Air Asia ate into Jet’s formidable market share.Naresh Goyal launched the airline in 1993. Jet became a listed company in 2005.After starting operations with four Boeing aircraft, Jet Airways became an international carrier in 2004 when it started flights to Colombo.Jet Airways acquired rival Sahara Airlines in 2007.Jet Airways survived a major scare in 2008, when global airline majors faced headwinds. Jet let nearly 2,000 employees go and restructured the operations to stay in business.In its 25 years of operations, Jet Airways aircraft have not been involved in any airline accidents where lives were lost. Closecenter_img A Jet Airways passenger aircraft prepares to land at the airport in the western Indian city of Ahmedabad August 12, 2013. [Representational Image]Reuters fileJet Airways has been the subject of grim rumours in the past week, even as it battled tailwinds owing to ballooning debts, falling market share and increasing fuel prices. The latest report suggests the carrier will need a huge cash infusion immediately to stay afloat.The Naresh Goyal-promoted airline needs as much as Rs 3,500 crore in cash immediately, Bloomberg reported, citing aviation analysts. Besides, the company will also need to restructure a whopping $400 million in debts immediately, the report said.On Thursday, Goyal said he was embarrassed over the troubles the airline was going through. After the company deferred reporting quarterly results, Goyal said he was feeling guilty about investors’ pain. The market freefall continued on Friday, with the stock falling another 15 percent.There have been reports about Jet Airways asking staff to take up to 25 percent cut in wages. However, the management denied it was mooting a pay cut. Reports had also surfaced that Jet was firing staff, which were also rubbished. The Jet management has also reiterated that they have met all loan repayment commitments so far, adding that refinancing options were being explored.However, the latest Bloomberg report cites analysts saying that the airline company’s default risk was the highest in close to three years. The chances of defaulting on loans in the next 12 months is the highest since October 2015, Bloomberg’s Default Risk model data showed.Analysts quoted by Bloomberg said Jet Airways will have to resort to drastic measures to come back from the brink. “They can do that by possibly doing sale and lease-back of their widebodies and getting costs down, especially in the domestic market … If they can recapitalize and restructure, then may be in a couple of years, they can be sustainable,” said Kapil Kaul, South Asia CEO for CAPA Centre for Aviation.Share freefallJet Airways shares plunged 15 percent FridayThe shares have fallen 66 percent so far this yearThis compares to an 11 percent rise in the Sensex in the corresponding periodThe freefall makes the airline stock the worst performing in the Asia Pacific regionJet Airways — debts, losses, other key factsJet Airways has a net debt of 81.5 billion rupees ($1.2 billion)In the year ended 31 March, the airline reported a loss of Rs 636.45 crore. Peers such as SpiceJet and Indigo had reported impressive profits during the same period.Most of Jet’s debts are dollar-denominated and hence a continued fall in the rupee has worsened the debt problem.Abu Dhabi’s Etihad Airways owns 24 percent in Jet Airways. It was reported earlier that Etihad was interested in taking a controlling stake in Jet Airways, but Naresh Goyal, who holds 51 percent, had declined the offer. It remains to be seen if Etihad will raise its stake in the current context.Jet Airways wants to raise loans in the markets but banks have insisted on a turnaround commitment. Loans are unlikely to be approved without significant cost reduction.last_img read more

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Hold On Houston The Great Oil Slump Is Almost Over…Maybe

first_img Share X To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Listen 00:00 /00:55 Dave FehlingDeloitte’s John England at Oil & Gas conference in HoustonWhen oil prices plummeted 50 percent in 2014, you might have heard people say what John England heard.“When people say we’ve seen this before, we actually haven’t seen this before. This downturn is very different than any downturn we’ve had in the past,” England told reporters attending the Deloitee Oil & Gas Conference in Houston.England leads energy analysis at the consulting firm. He says this downturn is uniquely bad, having lasted longer than ones in ‘86 and ‘98. Deloitte surveyed oil & gas executives recently to see when they thought this downturn would end. “I think there’s, at best, cautious optimism that we’ve turned the corner and things are starting to go up. Over 50 percent of them believe we’ll get back to $60 a barrel by the end of 2017,” England told reporters.England says $60 a barrel for oil is the threshold that would allow many oil & gas companies to grow versus just survive. Oil now is at about $45 a barrel. The Deloitte survey found many executives think the recovery is underway right now or will be by next year. But the survey found about a third of the executives thought a recovery won’t begin until 2018. Then there’s the political factor. When a new president is elected in November, England says a lot of people in the energy industry may still wonder what impact it’ll have on their business.“The level of uncertainty around this election seems higher than I ever remember in any past ones…because I think they’re not putting out a lot of specifics around energy policy. I don’t think it’s really been front and center in this election. “last_img read more

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Corps Funding Will Cover Less Than A Third The Cost Of A

first_img 00:00 /00:49 Graphic by Todd WisemanThis week, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers finally funded the start of a coastal spine, also known as the “Ike Dike,” to guard Greater Houston against storm surges. But the grant still falls short of what’s needed. The Corps allocated close to $5 billion for flood control infrastructure projects in Texas, including $3.9 billion for the construction of a coastal spine stretching from Galveston Bay to Sabine Pass.“Four billion is absolutely a step in the right direction, but is decidedly not nearly enough to protect the region from a direct hit from a major, major hurricane,” says Philip Bedient, director of the Severe Storm Prediction, Education & Evacuation from Disasters (SSPEED) Center at Rice University.Engineers and policymakers have been pressing for construction of a coastal spine since 2008, when Hurricane Ike devastated Galveston and nearly sent a storm surge straight up the Houston Ship Channel. Bedient says $4 billion would just cover the cost of a coastal levee. He estimates building the entire system, including surge gates across the Bolivar Roads, would cost more than $12 billion. Listen Sharecenter_img X To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: last_img read more

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Encryption on iPhones Facebook Apparently Petrified the NSA

first_img Hear from business owners and CEOs who went through a crippling business problem and came out the other side bigger and stronger. Stronger encryption in Apple’s iPhones and on websites like Facebook has “petrified” the U.S. government because it has made it harder to spy on communications, Glenn Greenwald, the writer who first reported on Edward Snowden’s stolen files, told CNBC.Former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden caused major shockwaves around the world in 2013 when he unveiled the surveillance body’s wide ranging spying practices, which included regularly attempting to snoop of data held by major technology companies.Glenn Greenwald, the man who helped Snowden publish the documents, said that Silicon Valley companies have bolstered the encryption on their products, thereby making it harder for governments to eavesdrop.”They (Apple) are now starting to put serious encryption technologies in their new iPhones in their new releases and this has really petrified governments around the world,” Greenwald told CNBC in an interview at tech fair CeBIT in Germany.Apple, Google, Facebook and Yahoo are some of the major companies that have been in the spotlight after Snowden’s revelations. Information from the Snowden documents released earlier this month detailed how the CIA had been trying for a decade to crack the security in Apple’s products. And last year, Yahoo revealed that it was threatened with a $250,000 per day fine if it didn’t hand over data to the NSA.The tech giants have been taking major steps to make sure their communications are safe from spying, a move Greenwald – who won a Pulitzer prize for his reporting on the topic – said was motivated by the fear of losing customers rather than care for data privacy.”I don’t…(think) they suddenly care about privacy,” Greenwald said.”If…you’re a Facebook executive or an Apple executive, you’re extremely worried that the next generation of users…are going to be vulnerable to the pitch from Brazilian, and Korean and German social media companies where they advertise and say don’t use Facebook and Google because they’ll give your data to the NSA.” 2 min read Problem Solvers with Jason Feifer This story originally appeared on CNBC March 19, 2015 Listen Nowlast_img read more

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