Legislature Goes on Annual Break

first_imgThe House of Representatives and the Senate respectively ended this year’s legislative session on Thursday, October 15 for their constitutional annual or constituency break, previously known as agriculture break.The formal closure of the 4th Session of the Senate marked the 29th day sitting, while the House was at the 13th day sitting of its extraordinary session.Conventionally, the Legislature, the first branch of government, embarks on its annual break on August 30, but extended its session by six weeks upon the request of President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf made on August 27 in accordance with Article 32b of the 1986 Constitution.“The President shall, on his (or her) own initiative or upon receipt of a certificate signed by at least one-fourth of the total membership of each House, and by proclamation, extend a regular session of the Legislature beyond the date for adjournment or call a special extraordinary session of that body to discuss or act upon matters of national emergency and concern. When the extension or call is at the request of the Legislature, the proclamation shall be issued not later than forty-eight hours after receipt of the certificate by the President,” the Constitution states.A rumor on the extension of the Legislature’s session by another 15 days did not materialize as a reason for the President’s visit on Wednesday with the joint leadership of the Legislature.The motion for adjournment of the 4th Session at the House of Representatives made by Montserrado County Representative Edward Forh was unanimously seconded.In his formal closing and statement of appreciation, Speaker J. Alex Tyler said the conclusion of the 4th Session of the 53rd Legislature was in agreement with their practice, law and constitutional warrant.ObituarySpeaker Tyler suggested a pause to commemorate the transition of the late Fofi Sahr Baimba of Lofa County.“May his soul, and the souls of all the faithful departed rest in peace. Many and varied were the vicissitudes which confronted us and our people, coming, as we were, from a vicious and unrelenting attack from the Ebola Virus,” the Speaker said.Legislative SummarySpeaker Tyler said the second Monday in January of 2015, was the start of the 4th Session, and the House of Representatives held several public hearings on various proposed bills and welcomed into their homes and offices, hundreds of their constituents, as they attended to their multiple problems.He said 38 bills are with the committees, while 33 bills were passed into law, with a number of bills still outstanding which, upon their return on Monday, January 14, 2016 they would start working on.Cautioning anti-graft institutions, Speaker Tyler stressed on integrity and urged them to persevere in their sacred objectives.House’s Interim AdministratorsThe Bomi County lawmaker pointed out that the House is adjourning for constituency visits, and wished his colleagues well as they rest with their respective family members to reflect on the past year’s work.But he stressed that the government does not shut down, and announced that the Statutory Committees and Representatives from the 15 counties will continue to meet and serve during the closure of the House.The interim administrators include Rep. Varmumah Corneh (Montserrado); Rep. Mary Kawah (Grand Bassa); Rep. Jeremiah McCauley (Sinoe); Rep. Dr. Isaac Roland (Maryland); Rep. Larry Younquoi (Nimba); Numennie Bartekwai (Grand Kru); Rep. Christian Chea (River Gee); Rep. Morias Waylee (Grand Gedeh); Rep. Byron Zarweah; Rep. Prince Moye (Bong); Rep. Stephen Kafi (Margibi); Rep. Clarence Massaquoi (Lofa) and; Rep. Haja Siryon (Bomi).Thankful CollaborationThe Speaker said the level of cooperation from the other two branches of government, the Judiciary and Executive, was courteous, cordial and mutually beneficial, for which he thanked the respective heads.Vote of thanksSpeaker Tyler extended his thanks and appreciation to the personal staffers, central administration staffs and the print and electronic media that helped to carry out their tasks during the 4th Sitting.“We also thank electors for keeping us busy, alert and on our toes! We wouldn’t have it any other way,” Speaker Tyler said.ProspectsThe Speaker said that as they approach 2016, they would do their utmost to tackle and, hopefully pass, many of the intractable bills remaining among the various committees.“The next sitting augurs promise and prospects because our fledgling democracy would be poised for a change in two years, fulfilling the constitutional and statutory mandate, vouchsafed to us by the organic laws of the state,” Speaker Tyler stressed.“With uncommon zeal, undaunted patriotism and a nationalistic fervor which knows no bounds, I salute you to the task which lies ahead,” he concluded.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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2 Ontario school boards drop high jump at elementary level due to

first_imgSAULT STE. MARIE, Ont. – They’ve been training for it, but students at elementary schools in Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., won’t get a chance to show off their high jumping abilities at track and field meets this week and next.The Algoma District School Board and Huron-Superior Catholic District School Board say they’ve decided to no longer offer high jump at the elementary level of competition due to the risk factor.The school boards note that high jump has been classified as a “higher risk activity” through the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines, due to the potential risk of injury to students.In a joint release on Wednesday, the school boards say they are committed to supporting athletic opportunities and physical activity while maintaining student safety as a priority.They say high jump will continue to be an event at the secondary level.“It was felt that the changed classification and the need to maintain student safety as a priority means this event is best suited for development at the secondary level where there is greater access to trained staff and proper equipment at sites,” the statement said.“We felt it best to maintain high jump at the secondary level and to have our younger students compete in events that are most appropriate for their stage of development and which can showcase their abilities with less risk involved,” Lucia Reece, Algoma District School Board director, said.John Stadnyk, education director for the Huron-Superior Catholic District School Board, said they decided that mitigating the risk to elementary students was the best action to take at this time.“We hope everyone understands the reasoning behind this decision, and wish all participants in the upcoming meets all the best,” he said.Wrestling, alpine skiing, and snowboarding are other sports classified as “higher risk” under the Ontario physical education guidelines.last_img read more

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