QuadGraphics HGI Partner to Expand Services

first_imgSussex, Wisconsin-based commercial printer Quad/Graphics has entered into a partnership with fellow Wisconsin printer HGI Company to provide both companies’ clients with a more complete range of products and services. Under the agreement, which was announced this week, Quad/Graphics will purchase a minority interest in HGI, providing it with additional resources to expand its product line. HGI president/CEO Craig C. Faust will retain his position at the company as well as majority ownership.The printers said the partnership will allow HGI to capitalize on Quad/Graphics’ technological capabilities, including high-speed, high-resolution digital presses, some with inline finishing capabilities; economies of scale and efficiencies through Quad/Graphics’ logistics services; comprehensive digital imaging services; extensive data and strategy services for leveraging customer intelligence to create personalized marketing programs; and a substantial geographic footprint spanning the U.S., Europe and South America.According to Faust, HGI “will be able to make investments that will allow us to execute more quickly on our growth strategy in short- to medium-run length commercial print. We’ll also leverage Quad/Graphics’ cutting-edge technology and capabilities and operational expertise to better serve our clients and give them the most value for their print spend.” And through HGI, Quad/Graphics said it will be able to offer clients quick-turn commercial printing needs, including in-store/point-of-purchase materials; marketing collateral; short-run books, catalogs and directories; print-on-demand custom publications; and specialty binding.In January, Quad/Graphics agreed to buy Worldcolor, formally Quebecor World, for an estimated $1.4 million stock exchange.last_img read more

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What Was Life Like Beside Bowie New Doc On Guitarist Mick Ronson

first_img New Rock Doc On Bowie Guitarist Mick Ronson what-was-life-beside-bowie-new-doc-guitarist-mick-ronson Email Twitter News What Was Life Like Beside Bowie? New Doc On Guitarist Mick Ronson Facebook Guitar great and David Bowie’s early ’70s musical partner is the subject of a new documentary out this fall Nate HertweckGRAMMYs Aug 31, 2017 – 5:52 pm As of late, more and more compelling music documentaries have been unearthing the stories behind the eras and albums we love. This fall, glam-rock guitar great Mick Ronson’s story gets its own rock doc.Behind Bowie: The Mick Ronson Story follows Ronson’s prolific career from his work with David Bowie as guitarist in the Spiders From Mars to his work with Lou Reed on his 1972 classic album, Transformer, and then with Bob Dylan as part of the Rolling Thunder Review live band in 1975–1976.”I spent a little time with David [Bowie],” Queen drummer Roger Taylor says in the trailer, “and he used to say when I found Mick Ronson, I found my Jeff Beck.”Ronson’s untimely death in 1993 at age 46 came far too soon, and Bowie said of his musical sideman, “If Mick had lived on, he would have become a major producer and arranger, and of course, he would have remained one of rock’s great guitar players.”The film hits select theaters Sept. 1 and home video Oct. 27.Read More: James Murphy On Advice From David Bowie, Being “Done” With Producinglast_img read more

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3 UN officials to visit Bangladesh to see Rohingyas

first_imgDisplaced Rohingya people at a makeshift camp in Kutupalong, Cox’s Bazar. UNB file photoThree top United Nations officials will jointly visit Bangladesh from 24-26 April to highlight the ongoing need for support for the humanitarian needs of over a million Rohingyas living in Cox’s Bazar.The three officials are the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), Filippo Grandi, the director general of the International Organization for Migration (IOM), Antonio Vitorino and the UN Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, Mark Lowcock.In the capital, Dhaka, the delegation will hold talks with senior government officials, including prime minister Sheikh Hasina and foreign minister AK Abdul Momen, to explore the ways the international community can provide further support to Bangladesh as hosts to the Rohingya, according to UNHCR.The delegation will then travel to Cox’s Bazar to meet with refugees, assess preparations underway ahead of the monsoon season and visit projects, including those involving food distribution and shelters.They will also meet Rohingyas who are working as volunteers, and observe a UNHCR-Government of Bangladesh registration exercise, designed to provide identity cards to all refugees, ensuring their access to aid services and protection as well as establishing their right to return to Myanmar.The aim of the visit is to highlight the need to continue strong international support for the humanitarian response while solutions for the Rohingya are pursued, including the creation of conditions in Myanmar’s Rakhine State that would allow for the voluntary, safe and dignified return of refugees to their homes.last_img read more

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Banker driver killed in Sirajganj road crash

first_imgBank official, driver killed in Sirajganj road crashTwo people, including a bank official, were killed when a private car plunged into a ditch by the Hatikumrul-Banpara highway at Harinchara Bazar of Ullapara upazila of Sirajganj on Thursday morning.The deceased are Amarul Hossain, 42, senior officer of Agrani Bank Ltd posted at its training institute in the capital and son of Abdul Malek of Sardia village in Boalmari upazila in Faridpur district, and Rubel, 45, driver of the private car, reports UNB.Abdul Quader Zilani, officer-in-charge of Hatikumrul Highway police station, said the private car carrying the bank official skidded off the road and fell into the ditch around 8:30am as its driver lost control over the steering, leaving Amarul dead on the spot and Rubel injured.The driver died on the way to hospital, he said.The bank officer was returning home from his in-laws’ house in Belkuchi upazila of Sirajganj when the tragedy struck him down, the OC added.last_img read more

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New Research From Psychological Science

first_imgUsing a Psychopharmacogenetic Approach To Identify the Pathways Through Which — and the People for Whom — Testosterone Promotes AggressionShawn N. Geniole, Tanya L. Procyshyn, Nicole Marley, Triana L. Ortiz, Brian M. Bird, Ashley L. Marcellus, Keith M. Welker, Pierre L. Bonin, Bernard Goldfarb, Neil V. Watson, and Justin M. Carré Racial Bias in Perceptions of Size and Strength: The Impact of Stereotypes and Group DifferencesDavid J. Johnson and John Paul Wilson Testosterone seems to increase aggression in men with certain personality characteristics, such as high dominance and low self-control, and this effect may be enhanced when those men also have a specific characteristic in their androgen receptor (AR) gene, this research suggests. Participants were men between 18 and 40 years old who completed personality questionnaires and provided a mouthwash sample for DNA extraction. In a task to measure the effects of testosterone on aggression, they were given either testosterone or placebo and were told they would play a game against a player who was in another room (this player was fictitious). In the game, participants received points exchangeable for money by repeatedly pressing a key on the keyboard, but those points could be stolen by the other player; when points were stolen, participants could respond by stealing points from the other player, but the stolen points would not be exchangeable for money. Choosing to steal points caused harm to the other player without any benefit for the participant and was thus used as a measure of aggression. Testosterone promoted aggression during the game among participants with high-risk personality profiles for aggression (high dominance, low self-control, and independent self-construal). This effect was enhanced among men who had more efficient AR genes, related to fewer cytosine-adenine-guanine repeats in the AR gene. These men also reported experiencing more pleasure but not anger during the aggression, which can indicate involvement of reward-related neurotransmitters (i.e., dopamine) on the heterogeneous effects of testosterone on aggression. Race influences judgments of size and strength, but those judgments are primarily based on objective physical features (e.g., bicep circumference), this research suggests. College students estimated other college students’ strength by looking at their full-body photos. Both groups included Asian, Black, and White students. Men with larger bicep circumference and more upper body strength were rated as stronger, but race also affected the ratings: Black men were perceived as stronger than White men, and Asian men were perceived as weaker than White men. The same pattern was obtained for women. Raters’ race and gender did not affect their ratings. In a second experiment, in which participants also rated height, a similar pattern of effects was obtained, and Asian men and women were rated as shorter than Black and White men and women. These results indicate that race impacts judgments of strength, but it does not necessarily decrease accuracy, as some biases derive from physical differences between groups, such as height (e.g., Asian men are on average shorter than White and Black men, and therefore race may reflect an actual physical difference). However, in the absence of individuating information, race may bias decisions more. This research may inform how we think about social issues such as police use of force —­ officers can use lethal force only when a person is a threat, so misjudgments of strength and size based on race may lead to the wrongful use of lethal force. center_img Reactivation of Previous Experiences in a Working Memory TaskGi-Yeul Bae and Steven J. Luck Recent experiences can have a large and automatic impact on the way we perceive and act on current events, even when those previous experiences are irrelevant for the current ones. Bae and Luck investigated whether these influences occur (a) because the past experiences change the synaptic connections among neurons and indirectly influence the way the current information is processed or (b) because the current events trigger an active representation of the previous experience, which directly impacts current processing. The researchers recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) while participants estimated stimuli orientations. On each trial, participants saw a teardrop-shaped stimulus and, after it disappeared, adjusted the orientation of a similar stimulus to match the orientation of the preceding one. Because the ERP data provided temporal information as well as the scalp distribution of brain activation, they allowed the researchers to decode previous-trial activation (due to a given stimulus orientation) from current-trial activation (due to a new orientation). Decoding of previous-trial activation began shortly after the current-trial stimulus was shown, which indicated that the current stimulus reactivated a representation of the previous trial, even though it was now irrelevant. Participants also tended to report orientations biased away from the orientation on the previous trial. Current events may thus trigger an active representation of previous events, potentially explaining how recent past experiences influence current processing.last_img read more

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