Russia: JSC Zvezdochka Ship Repair Center Starts Repair Works on Smolensk

first_img December 26, 2011 Share this article Back to overview,Home naval-today Russia: JSC Zvezdochka Ship Repair Center Starts Repair Works on Smolensk Russia: JSC Zvezdochka Ship Repair Center Starts Repair Works on Smolensk JSC Zvezdochka Ship Repair Center (affiliate of United Shipbuilding Corporation) started repair works on Project 949A Antei nuclear-powered attack submarine Smolensk.The sub was taken over by the shipyard in Sept 2011, laid up and docked in Nov 2011. In the dock, experts of Zvezdochka center will perform basic works on the hull. This phase will last several months. In spring 2012, the submarine will be launched and repair will continue afloat. Zvezdochka specialists will refuel nuclear reactor and carry out a number of recovery works on the sub’s onboard systems. Upon termination of overhaul, lifetime of the submarine will become 3 years longer. SSN Smolensk is supposed to return to the Navy in the summer of 2013.SSN Smolensk is the second Project 949A submarine passing repair at Zvezdochka. In Nov 2011, the shipyard had finished breakdown maintenance of analogous submarine SSN Voronezh which is currently at her permanent basing site.“Returning Antei subs to the ranks, we prepare not only production facilities but our staff for prospective modernization”, said Director General of Zvezdochka shipyard Vladimir Nikitin. “Experience acquired on SSN Voronezh and SSN Smolensk will be a perfect basis for further effective modernization of those and other third-generation nuclear subs, in particular Project 971 Schuka-B.As was earlier reported, when lifetime of Project 949A submarines is expired they are supposed to be modernized and equipped with up-to-date arms systems, i.e. missile systems Onyx and Caliber. Those works will be performed by companies of United Shipbuilding Corporation. Antei-class subs of Northern Fleet will be refitted by Zvezdochka, and Pacific Fleet ones – by Zvezda shipyard.Reference:Nuclear-powered attack submarine K-410 Smolensk (Project 949A Antei). The sub was built in Severodvinsk by Sevmash shipyard under the project developed by Rubin design bureau (St. Petersburg); joined the Navy on Dec 22, 1990; obtained the name of Smolensk on Apr 6, 1993.According to experts, Project 949A developed in mid-70’s was a culmination of so-called ‘flattop killer concept’. Those subs were an ‘asymmetric response’ to NATO’s carrier strike groups during the Cold War. Today, Project 949A nuclear subs armed with Granit supersonic cruise missiles are the main strike force of Russian Navy capable to counter any surface targets including an opponent’s carrier groups.Length of an Antei-class submarine is 155 meters; beam is 18.2 meters; displacement is 24,000 tons; max submerged speed is 32 knots; test depth is 600 meters; armament includes 24 launch tubes for P-700 Granit cruise missiles with firing range of 500 km, and 6 torpedo tubes.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , December 26, 2011; Industry news View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Smolensk View post tag: Naval View post tag: starts View post tag: works View post tag: ship View post tag: JSC View post tag: Zvezdochka View post tag: Navy View post tag: repair View post tag: centerlast_img read more

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USFF Showcases FRV Coveralls for Senior Enlisted Leadership

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today USFF Showcases FRV Coveralls for Senior Enlisted Leadership USFF Showcases FRV Coveralls for Senior Enlisted Leadership November 7, 2013 Training & Educationcenter_img U.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFF) showcased the new flame-resistant variant (FRV) coveralls to senior enlisted leadership onboard Naval Station (NAVSTA) Norfolk, Nov. 1.The FRVs are said to be a critical first step in improving the level of protection from flame and flash fire hazards associated with shipboard operations, as well as ensuring shipboard environments are safe.Although the likelihood of a major shipboard conflagration is low, if it does happen, the consequences could be severe or fatal. For the FRV, the Navy’s overall objective is to provide maximum protection to cover all possible contingencies and scenarios.Earlier this year Adm. Bill Gortney, USFF commander, and Adm. Cecil D. Haney, then commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet approved the development and issue of FRV coveralls for all Sailors assigned to ships as an added safety precaution due to the inherent risks Sailors at sea can experience.“Safety of our Sailors was the driving force behind the development of the FRV coverall,” said Fleet Master Chief (AW/SW/IDW) Chuck Clarke, USFF.According to new wear instructions, the FRV will not be used in place of organizational clothing mandated for specific operational environments, such as flight decks or while performing work on electrical systems that require arc-flash protection.“It is intended to be the midterm solution while we continue researching an all-purpose coverall incorporating three important characteristics: flame-resistant, arc-flash resistant and low-lint,” said Clarke. “Once developed, this will allow possible elimination of several other types of organizational clothing, streamlining and standardizing what’s needed at sea.”The FRV coveralls were extensively tested by the Navy Clothing and Textile Research Facility (NCTRF), a government-owned and operated laboratory located in Natick, Mass., and passed all flame and flash fire testing requirements in various conditions: new, after 25 washes, and after 50 washes. According to NCTRF, the flame-resistance properties of the FRV did not degrade with wear or laundering. All coveralls were tested with a 100 percent cotton t-shirt and brief underneath, pinned on metal collar insignia, leather nametag with Velcro backing and a web belt with clip. While underway, chiefs and officers will wear a khaki, cotton web belt. Command ball caps are authorized for wear; and covers, footwear, outerwear and undershirts will be the same for the FRV as currently authorized for the utility coverall.Each FRV, which mirrors the design of the existing blue utility coverall, will be constructed from 100 percent cotton, flame-retardant treated fabric currently used in the repair locker coverall. There are more than 50 different sizes available for the FRV, but because of the nature cotton fabric, some shrinkage (approximately three to six percent) will occur during laundering. Sailors may require one size larger at initial issue. It is also anticipated that some color fading will occur over time.Like other organizational clothing, the FRVs will be replaced by each ship over time based on normal wear and tear. The optimal wear life is estimated at 18-24 months, however, the wear life could potentially be less from heavy use. FRVs are ordered by units from the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA). Should the FRV become soiled, torn or prematurely worn, Sailors should turn in the unserviceable FRV to be issued a new set.Initial fleet supplies, approximately 230,000 coveralls, will be subsidized by already available fleet funding (no out-of-pocket expenses to Sailors). Fleet Sailors who are scheduled to deploy in early 2014, and Sailors assigned to forward deployed naval forces, will receive new FRV before the end of the year. All fleet surface Sailors will be issued two sets of FRVs by September 2014.The average per-unit procurement cost for an FRV coverall is estimated at $50.24. The Navy has spent approximately $40,000 in fielding the new FRV, and will cost the Navy $11.5 million to procure the initial issue and distribute it among the fleet. The total cost to field and issue the new FRVs is approximately $12 million.“Our seabag today contains no flame-resistant items in it,” explained Capt. Frank W. Futcher, N41 Supply Ops/Fleet Services, USFF, noting that existing utility coveralls, made with a 65 percent polyester fabric, and the Navy Working Uniform (NWU) type I, made with a 50/50 nylon-cotton blend fabric, are not flame-resistant and will not self-extinguish. Futcher said commands should be vigilant of what is worn under or over the FRV, but said the existing foul weather jacket and green flyer’s jacket used afloat are authorized cold weather garments that are designed to be flame-resistant. “[The seabag] does have a few wool items in it, a peacoat and the optional wool sweater you can wear shipboard, but neither of those wool items are flame-resistant. Wool is a natural fiber, and does contain its own moisture and will self-extinguish, but when exposed to flame, it too will burn.”The FRVs are said to provide the same protection as the current engineering coveralls and are intended for general shipboard use, however, they do not serve as a firefighting ensemble. When worn with correct battle dress (flash hood, gloves, pant legs tucked in, top button buttoned, sleeves rolled down and buttoned, and steel-toed leather boots), the coveralls provide Sailors with significant levels of protection against a variety of flame and flash fire hazards. The long-term solution will be to develop an all-purpose flame-resistant coverall that will be suitable for general shipboard use, taking into consideration type commander (TYCOM) specific requirements.“Once FRVs are issued, it is the only uniform authorized to be worn at sea, to include all watchstations,” said Clarke. “The NWU type I, the current seabag coveralls and other polyester and poly blend uniforms will no longer be authorized for wear underway except for special events [such as manning the rails, change of command, or receptions held at anchor]. There is still the safety requirement for arc-flash protection, low-lint and flight deck clothing, which the FRV will not replace.”Submarine personnel will continue to wear the poly/cotton utility coveralls until a long-term all-purpose coverall solution that is flame-resistant with low-lint qualities is made available. However, a specific timeline for a roll-out to the fleet is unknown at this time. Units with existing stocks of suitable flame-resistant clothing, such as engineering coveralls, are directed to continue distribution until stocks are exhausted.Futcher noted that Sailors who have not been issued FRV coveralls are safe at sea. Current organizational clothing and the NWU type I remain safe uniforms when worn properly and under normal steaming conditions, however, they are not appropriate for firefighting.This month and through December, TYCOMs will hold a series of discussions in fleet concentration areas to ensure Sailors have an opportunity to see the new FRV. The goal is to provide an understanding on the basics of where, when and how to wear the new coverall.[mappress]Press Release, November 07, 2013; Image: US Navy Share this articlelast_img read more

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US Navy’s EODMU 8 Takes Part in Exercise Open Spirit 2014

first_img View post tag: Spirit US Navy’s EODMU 8 Takes Part in Exercise Open Spirit 2014 Training & Education View post tag: Navy Back to overview,Home naval-today US Navy’s EODMU 8 Takes Part in Exercise Open Spirit 2014 View post tag: takes View post tag: £8 View post tag: Exercise View post tag: part View post tag: 2014center_img View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Naval View post tag: EODMU View post tag: open Members of US Navy’s Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 8 (EODMU 8) are participating in the international naval force exercise Open Spirit 2014, which kicked off its active phase in the Irbe Strait and the waters off the western Latvia coast, May 12. May 13, 2014 Held annually in one of the Baltic States, exercise participants hone their explosive ordance search and disposal skills coming together to clear Baltic Sea shipping routes, communication lines and fishing areas of ordnance left over from World Wars I and II.“This year we found a specific objective to accomplish, a World War II German freighter that was carrying large mines,” said Lt. Mikel Rodriguez, from the Mine Counter-Measures Company Command. “Our objective is to clear as much of it as we can. We are going to go and verify first, see what we encounter, and operate from there.”EODMU 8’s Open Spirit role will be to assist with and conduct diving operations with NATO allies and partners. Reconnaissance marking of the site will take place first; followed by rigging and towing of the ordnance that will then be moved to a designated safe zone and detonated.The naval explosive ordnance disposal team will consist of divers from Latvia, Estonia, Canada and Poland. According to Rodriguez, Open Spirit is an opportunity to improve cooperation and tactics, fostering partnerships between the participating countries. “Interoperability is key, especially with our NATO allies and partners,” said Rodriguez. “It’s absolutely critical, because we frequently rely on their regional expertise here in Europe, their logistics and their support.”Rodriquez said that along with breaking down the language and military cultural barriers that allow the U.S. to operate together more proficiently with allies and partners, he hopes his unit will become even more capable at executing mission objectives.Exercise Open Spirit 2014 is led by Latvian Naval Force Flotilla, consisting of 26 ships and five dive teams from 13 countries; two Maritime Mine Counter-Measure units, the Baltic Naval Squadron (BALTRON) and the Standing NATO Mine Countermeasures Group 1 (SNMCMG1). EODMU 8 provides an operational explosive ordnance disposal capability to locate, identify, render safe, recover, field evaluate, and dispose of all explosive ordnance as directed by Commander, Task Force 68.[mappress]Press Release, May 13, 2014; Image: US Navy Share this articlelast_img read more

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HMAS Yarra Recovers Anchor and Shackles from Seabed

first_img View post tag: Asia-Pacific Personnel in the Australian coastal mine hunter HMAS Yarra have used their diving expertise to recover an anchor and shackles weighing one tonne from the seabed near Ashmore Island. Authorities View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Anchor July 24, 2014 View post tag: Naval View post tag: Australian Navy The anchor, belonging to Armidale class patrol boat HMAS Bundaberg, was cut lose when it firmly wedged beneath a large boulder and the sea floor during a recent patrol for Operation RESOLUTE – the Australian Defence Force’s contribution to the whole-of-government effort to protect Australia’s borders and offshore maritime interests.Yarra, also assigned to Operation RESOLUTE, conducted a reconnaissance dive at the site on the 22 June 2014.Commanding Officer of Yarra, Lieutenant Commander Brendan O’Hara, said the initial reconnaissance dive took approximately one hour.“Before leaving the area, Bundaberg marked the location of the anchor using an orange pimple buoy,” he said.“During the recon dive, the divers identified the required direction to pull the anchor using a magnetic compass, and then we developed a plan on how to recover the anchor.”The recovery serial took place the following day, commencing at 9:30am with the launch of the dive boat and ending with the anchor recovery at 11:30am.Once in the water, the divers made their way to the anchor to connect the recovery line. The ship was then moved into position using Auxiliary Power Units to pull the anchor out from beneath the boulder on a bearing provided by the divers.Next, a tow line was passed to the ship and connected to the stern. The ship’s main engine was started and, in conjunction with the Auxiliary Power Units, the anchor was successfully retrieved.The recovery of the anchor to the waterline was next tackled using Yarra’s sweep winch. Once on the waterline, a lifting strop was connected to the starboard-side crane on the sweep deck and the anchor was lifted onto the deck.Lieutenant Commander O’Hara said having to use the ship in a tow-configuration to pull the anchor out from under the boulder was unique.“We don’t train specifically for this, but we utilised the same techniques that we might use to recover a mine from the seabed,” he said.“The recovery was a good opportunity to put our skills in planning and execution to the test.”Bundaberg’s anchor has now been returned to Patrol Boat Group via HMAS Coonawarra in Darwin.[mappress]Press Release, July 24, 2014; Image: Australian Navy View post tag: HMAS Yarra View post tag: Seabed View post tag: Navy Back to overview,Home naval-today HMAS Yarra Recovers Anchor and Shackles from Seabed View post tag: Recovers View post tag: Shackles HMAS Yarra Recovers Anchor and Shackles from Seabed Share this articlelast_img read more

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2016 a year of firsts for the US 7th Fleet

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today 2016 a year of firsts for the US 7th Fleet View post tag: US 7th Fleet Authorities As the U.S. Navy’s 7th Fleet looks back at 2016, it looks back at a year of innovations, new partnerships and upgraded ships.Ships and personnel teamed up with allies and partner nations in more than 110 exercises to exchange information, enhance capabilities and train together throughout 2016.Major exercises included Keen Sword, Ulchi Freedom Guardian, Ssang Yong, and nine different Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) series exercises.The 7th Fleet flagship USS Blue Ridge kicked off her patrol in February, traveling 13,000 nautical miles across the Indo-Asia Pacific to strengthen partnerships and promote peace and stability in the region.The ship visited 10 ports in 7 countries conducting various engagements such as staff talks, sports activities, receptions onboard the ship, community relations events, and much more.During the patrol, various distinguished visitors came onboard including the Sri Lankan President, Maithripala Sirisena, Indian Minister of Defence, Manohar Parrikar, and Secretary of Defense Ash Carter.Of note, Blue Ridge was the first U.S. ship to visit Sri Lanka in five years and for the 46-year-old ship, it visited India for the first time in 17 years.After the patrol, the Blue Ridge entered dry dock at Naval Ship Repair Facility and Japan Regional Maintenance Center (SRF JRMC) to begin its scheduled extended dry-docking selected restricted availability (EDSRA). The ship will receive not only maintenance, but equipment upgrades to enable the ship to carry out its mission in 7th Fleet for many years to come.In February, 7th Fleet welcomed the USS John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group (JCSCSG), also hailed as the Great Green Fleet for its use of alternative fuels. From February to June, the fleet, comprised of approximately 7,000 sailors, completed routine operations in the South China Sea and made port visits across the Indo-Asia Pacific, highlighting the Navy’s efforts to transform its energy use to increase operational capability.In March, JCSSG and other U.S. military forces worked alongside the Republic of Korea armed forces during exercise Foal Eagle. During its four months in 7th Fleet, the JCSSG also conducted passing exercises with the French navy and Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) and in June, participated in Malabar 2016, a trilateral maritime exercise with the Indian navy, JMSDF, and U.S. Navy.In that month the JCSCSG also conducted dual carrier operations with the Ronald Reagan Strike Group in the Philippine Sea. The ships and aircraft assigned to both strike groups conducted coordinated operations in international waters demonstrating the unique capability to operate multiple carrier strike groups in close proximity.The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Barry (DDG 52) joined 7th Fleet March 3 as a Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD)-capable destroyer, bringing the newest Aegis combat system, Baseline 9.C, to 7th Fleet and the capability to fire all Vertical Launch System (VLS) ordnance, including the newest missiles, RIM-161 Standard Missile 3 (SM-3) and RIM-161 Standard Missile 6 (SM-6).Exercise Keen Sword (KS) is the largest joint, bilateral field training exercise between the U.S. military and the Japan Self-Defense Force (JSDF). Approximately, 11,000 U.S. military personnel participated in KS 2017 from October to November, including those assigned to U.S. Forces Japan Headquarters, 5th Air Force, U.S. Naval Forces Japan, U.S. Army Japan, III Marine Expeditionary Force and 7th Fleet.The forces conducted training with JSDF counterparts at military installations throughout mainland Japan, Okinawa and in the air and waters surrounding Japan, Guam and Tinian, to increase combat readiness and interoperability within the framework of the U.S.-Japan alliance.The 11th annual Pacific Partnership mission moved through 7th Fleet from May to September, working alongside one another in six countries to improve disaster response preparedness and enhance relationships in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region.Multinational humanitarian assistance and disaster relief (HADR), medical, and civil-engineering teams partnered with their counterparts in each country to conduct live search and rescue field training exercises, subject matter expert exchanges, cooperative health engagements and community relations events.In addition to training for HADR incidents, assets operating in the 7th Fleet AOO were able to respond to real world incidents in the region.In the aftermath of several devastating earthquakes in Kumamoto, VMM-265 attached to the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, arrived at Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni April 17-18 with approximately eight Ospreys to provide airlift support at the request of the Government of Japan. Sailors, soldiers, airmen and Marines were able to deliver more than 230,000 pounds of relief supplies to Japanese forces operating in remote areas of the quake zone.In November, the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102), operating forward in 7th Fleet under the command of 3rd Fleet, made a historic visit to New Zealand when she participated in the Royal New Zealand Navy’s International Naval Review commemorating the 75th anniversary of the Royal New Zealand Navy, making her the first U.S. Navy ship to visit New Zealand in 30 years.Sampson’s presence in the Western Pacific allowed the ship to join a U.S. Navy P-3C Orion aircraft supporting New Zealand Kaikoura earthquake recovery efforts, at the request of the New Zealand government. View post tag: US Navycenter_img January 4, 2017 2016 a year of firsts for the US 7th Fleet Share this articlelast_img read more

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FS Charles de Gaulle leaves dry dock after 14 months

first_img View post tag: French Navy Share this article View post tag: FS Charles de Gaulle French Navy’s sole aircraft carrier FS Charles de Gaulle has entered the water again after spending over 14 months in the dry dock as part of her mid-life upgrade.The aircraft carrier was refloated at the Toulon navy base on May 16 after entering the dry dock on February 8, 2017.FS Charles de Gaulle will spend the next few months undergoing further modifications and fine tuning before starting sea trials in the fall. A return to the fleet is expected to take place in 2019.Once completed, the 1.3 billion euro refit will allow the FS Charles de Gaulle to serve the Marine Nationale for another 20 years.The undertaking is led by DGA (French armament procurement agency), the French Navy’s Fleet Support Department and the aircraft carrier’s crew in collaboration with shipbuilder Naval Group.In addition to nuclear reactors inspection and fuel replacement, the ship will return to the fleet with a new combat system, improved IT networks and communications systems. Various changes to the sensors, early-warning radars, navigation radars, infrared sensors and optronic cameras are also on the list. The control room had to be refurbished to be able to house the SENIT combat management system.FS Charles de Gaulle has also been adapted for the new carrier air wing, with a transition to “all-Rafale” operations after the modernised Super Etendard were withdrawn from service in March 2016.While the FS Charles de Gaulle is undergoing her refit in Toulon, pilots from her carrier air wing are keeping their skills sharp aboard the US Navy aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush as part of a deployment dubbed Chesapeake 2018.Charles De Gaulle (R 91) is the only other short form take-off nuclear carrier outside of the US Navy. Photo: French Navycenter_img View post tag: Naval Group Photo: FS Charles de Gaulle leaves the dry dock at Toulon Navy base on May 16, 2018. Photo: French Navylast_img read more

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Textron gets contract for US ship to shore connector craft

first_img navaltoday View post tag: Textron Systems Back to overview,Home naval-today Textron Systems gets USD 386M contract for US Navy’s ship to shore connector craft Textron Systems gets USD 386M contract for US Navy’s ship to shore connector craft View post tag: Ship-to-Shore Connector The US Navy has awarded a USD 386 million fixed price incentive-firm target and firm fixed price contract modification to Textron Systems for the construction of fifteen additional ship to shore connector craft. Work will be performed primarily in New Orleans, Louisiana.Ship to shore connectors are the evolutionary replacement for the existing fleet of landing craft, air cushion (LCAC) vehicles, and will primarily transport weapon systems, equipment, cargo, and personnel of the assault elements through varied environmental conditions from amphibious ships over to the beach, according to the US Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA).“As the program continues to move forward with delivering these important capabilities to the fleet, the procurement of these additional craft is critical,” Tom Rivers, program manager of the Amphibious Warfare Program Office for the Program Executive Office Ships, said.The contract award comes after the US Navy accepted delivery of the first of the next generation landing craft, ship to shore connector craft 100, on February 6, 2020. Craft 100 is the developmental unit for the next-generation landing craft and will be located in Panama City, Florida where additional testing and crew training will be conducted.The second craft, LCAC 101, is making headway and will head to sea within the next few weeks for builder’s trials for assessment of its operational readiness.During the trials, LCAC 101 will undergo integrated testing in both unloaded and loaded states to ensure the craft will successfully meet all requirements. The detail design and construction contract procured nine craft. Beyond Craft 100 and LCAC 101, an additional seven craft are in the later stages of production.The LCAC 100 class craft will address the growing capability and capacity necessary to transport joint forces at the U.S. Marine Corps Marine Expeditionary Brigade, Army Brigade Combat Team, or similarly sized joint force to and across the beach.These craft incorporate improvements over the legacy LCAC to increase range and lift capability while ensuring compatibility with existing well deck equipped amphibious ships, as well as expeditionary transfer cock and expeditionary sea bases. Vessels April 17, 2020, by View post tag: NAVSEA View post tag: US Navy Share this articlelast_img read more

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Solar System Exploration Postdoctoral Fellow

first_imgApplications are invited for a postdoctoral position in theDepartment of Earth and Planetary Sciences ( http://eps.jhu.edu ) at Johns HopkinsUniversity working with the new SSERVI team Project ESPRESSO (https://www.espresso.institute). The Postdoctoral Fellow will be working under the supervision ofProf. Sarah Hörst ( www.sarahhorst.com ) but will beexpected to participate as a full member of the Project ESPRESSOTeam, which will include collaborations with Prof. Kevin Lewis inEPS and ESPRESSO Team Members at other institutions. ThePostdoctoral Fellow’s primary responsibilities will includelaboratory measurements of optical constants and a candidate withexperience in these types of measurements and data analysis ispreferred. Secondary responsibilities of the Postdoctoral Fellowwill include participation in fieldwork and data analysis ofgeological materials using LIBS and Raman spectroscopy under thesupervision of Prof. Kevin Lewis. Additional opportunities may alsobe available to participate in microgravity flight campaigns, fieldcampaigns, and other Project ESPRESSO efforts. Dr. Hörst iscommitted to building a diverse and inclusive research group andcandidates with a demonstrated history of efforts to improvediversity and inclusion in STEM are especially encouraged toapply.The position is for one year, but renewable for up to a total of 3years contingent on satisfactory performance. The position includessalary, benefits, and funding for travel to professionalconferences and annual SSERVI team meetings. Johns HopkinsUniversity has parental leave for Postdoctoral Fellows ( https://www.jhu.edu/assets/uploads/2017/06/newchildaccommgradandpostdoc.pdf). The Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and Prof. Hörst’slaboratory are housed in Olin Hall. All entrances and floors ofOlin Hall are handicapped accessible. Olin Hall has all genderbathrooms and a Mother’s room.PhD requiredApplicants should submit their CV (including publications), a 1-2page statement of research interests, and contact informationincluding email addresses for 3 references. Please contact Prof.Hörst with any questions about the position ([email protected]).Review of applications will begin on April 15, 2020.The Johns Hopkins University is committed to equal opportunity forits faculty, staff, and students. To that end, the university doesnot discriminate on the basis of sex, gender, marital status,pregnancy, race, color, ethnicity, national origin, age,disability, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity orexpression, veteran status or other legally protectedcharacteristic. The university is committed to providing qualifiedindividuals access to all academic and employment programs,benefits and activities on the basis of demonstrated ability,performance and merit without regard to personal factors that areirrelevant to the program involved.The successful candidate(s) for this position will be subject to apre-employment background check.If you are interested in applying for employment with The JohnsHopkins University and require special assistance or accommodationduring any part of the pre-employment process, please contact theHR Business Services Office at [email protected] For TTYusers, call via Maryland Relay or dial 711.The following additional provisions may apply depending on whichcampus you will work. Your recruiter will adviseaccordingly.During the Influenza (“the flu”) season, as a condition ofemployment, The Johns Hopkins Institutions require all employeeswho provide ongoing services to patients or work in patient care orclinical care areas to have an annual influenza vaccination orpossess an approved medical or religious exception. Failure to meetthis requirement may result in termination of employment.The pre-employment physical for positions in clinical areas,laboratories, working with research subjects, or involvingcommunity contact requires documentation of immune status againstRubella (German measles), Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella(chickenpox), Hepatitis B and documentation of having received theTdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination. This may includedocumentation of having two (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicellavaccines; or antibody status to these diseases from laboratorytesting. Blood tests for immunities to these diseases areordinarily included in the pre-employment physical exam except forthose employees who provide results of blood tests or immunizationdocumentation from their own health care providers. Anyvaccinations required for these diseases will be given at no costin our Occupational Health office.Equal Opportunity EmployerNote: Job Postings are updated daily and remain online untilfilled.EEO is the LawLearn more:https://www1.eeoc.gov/employers/upload/eeoc_self_print_poster.pdfImportant legal informationhttp://hrnt.jhu.edu/legal.cfmlast_img read more

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BSW/MSW Adjunct Instructor

first_imgPosting Details Does this position provide patient or clinical services to theVCU Health System?No Working TitleBSW/MSW Adjunct Instructor DepartmentSocial Work Open Until FilledNo Job Code/Title At VCU, we Make it Real through learning, research, creativity,service and discovery — the hallmarks of the VCU experience. Apremier, urban, public research university nationally recognized asone of the best employers for diversity, VCU is a great place towork. It’s a place of opportunity, where your success is supportedand your career can thrive. VCU offers employees a generous leavepackage, career paths for advancement, competitive pay, and anopportunity to do mission-driven work. CampusMonroe Park Campus Anticipated Hiring RangeCommensurate Description of the Job * Do you have a Masters degree?YesNo Position TypeAdjunct – Teaching Normal work days Organizational Overview Job CategoryAdjunct – Teaching Is any portion of this position grant-funded?No Hours/Week Normal work hours Sensitive PositionNo Recruitment PoolAll Applicants * If yes, what discipline is your degree in? (If no, typeN/A)(Open Ended Question)* If you have earned an MSW, do you have a minimum of two yearspost-degree practice experience?YesNo Supplemental QuestionsRequired fields are indicated with an asterisk (*). Job Open Date06/25/2020 Quick Linkhttps://www.vcujobs.com/postings/99355 Resource CriticalYes Preferred Qualifications Two years post MSW degree practice experiencePrior teaching experience in social work education Remove from posting on or before06/01/2021 Masters Degree. Strong oral presentation and communication skills.Ability to work in a diverse environment Special Instructions to Applicants * Describe your understanding of diversity and inclusion andwhy you feel it is important to this position?(Open Ended Question)* How has your background and experience prepared you forworking with a diverse population?(Open Ended Question)* Would you be interested in teaching through an online ordistance format?YesNo Optional & Required DocumentsRequired DocumentsCover Letter/Letter of ApplicationResumeOptional DocumentsOther Document All candidates must attach to this application a cover letter,curriculum vitae or resume, and the names/contact information forthree references (as an “Other Document”). For information aboutthe School of Social Work, please visithttps://www.socialwork.vcu.edu/ A background check, employment verification and officialtranscripts will be required prior to start date. Position NumberJ00001 The BSW and MSW Programs in the School of Social Work at VirginiaCommonwealth University are recruiting a pool of applicants forpossible adjunct teaching positions in the following area(s) offocus: human behavior in the social environment, research,practice, policy, social justice, or various elective topics.Should the need for such adjunct teaching positions becomeavailable, the School of Social Work will contact persons in thepool whose credentials match our teaching needs. This pool will beaccessed only when an opening arises. Your credentials will remainactive for one year after the date you submit them. After one year,if you are still interested in adjunct teaching, you must re-applyto this adjunct pool. Note that we are unable to hire applicantswho are not already in the pool.Responsibilities:1. TeachingTeach BSW and/or MSW course(s) in the School of Social Work asneeded. These classes could be inclusive of all areas within thediscipline (listed above); to include face to face and/or distanceeducation.2. ServiceAs specified Required Qualifications Does this position require a pre-placement medicalassessment?No Additional Informationlast_img read more

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Assistant Professor (Non-Tenure Track), Department of Neurosurgery (03-318-021)

first_imgWe value diversity and how it enriches our academic andscientific community and strive toward cultivating an inclusiveenvironment that supports all employees. Assistant Professor (Non-Tenure Track), Department ofNeurosurgery (03-318-021):The Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Maryland Schoolof Medicine is actively recruiting a full-time Board eligible/BoardCertified neurosurgeon with specific interests in neurotrauma andspinal disorders.Candidates should be eligible for an unrestricted license in theState of Maryland and have completed fellowship-level training incomplex and/or minimally invasive spine surgery. This positionrequires a medical degree from a recognized accredited domesticuniversity (or foreign equivalent), a strong commitment to patientcare, clear and focused research interests, and demonstratedexcellence in teaching and ability to work effectively within ateam setting.Expected rank for this position will be Assistant Professor,however, final rank and tenure status will be commensurate withselected candidate’s experience.For immediate consideration, please submit a cover letter and arecent CV, including names and contact information of threereferences.For additional questions after application, please [email protected] :UMB is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. Allqualified applicants will receive consideration for employmentwithout regard to sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, race,color, religion, national origin, disability, protected Veteranstatus, age, or any other characteristic protected by law orpolicy.last_img read more

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