Mauritian Eagle Insurance Co. Limited (MEI.mu) 2013 Annual Report

first_imgMauritian Eagle Insurance Co. Limited (MEI.mu) listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius under the Insurance sector has released it’s 2013 annual report.For more information about Mauritian Eagle Insurance Co. Limited (MEI.mu) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Mauritian Eagle Insurance Co. Limited (MEI.mu) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Mauritian Eagle Insurance Co. Limited (MEI.mu)  2013 annual report.Company ProfileMauritian Eagle Insurance Co. Limited is a leading insurance company headquartered in Mauritius that provides insurance products and services for private individuals, SMEs, and corporates in Mauritius, where services such as property insurance against damage to building and other structures, machinery equipment, motor insurance; liability insurance, including employers, family, product, professional indemnity, public, directors and officers liability, accident and health insurance are offered. Mauritian Eagle Insurance Co. Limited is listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius.last_img read more

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I’d buy this low-cost stock and its chunky dividends for my ISA right now!

first_img See all posts by Royston Wild In recent days, I’ve explained why Ibstock could be about to furnish the market with some upbeat trading details. The UK’s vast homes shortage creates a fertile outlook for the homebuilders, along with providers of essential components like bricks. The ‘Boris Bounce’ that followed December’s general election has boosted the near-term picture for the construction industry too.Forterra (LSE: FORT) is another share that’s looking good to ride this favourable trading environment. The FTSE 250 brickbuilder was positive-but-restrained in its most recent market update in January. Then it advised that “the challenging market conditions experienced in the second half of 2019 [should] gradually improve.” But it added: “The group’s performance in the first half of 2020 will be below that achieved in the first half of 2019.”5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…It’s quite possible that, given the bounce to the housing market since the start of the year, Forterra will be a little more upbeat when full-year trading results are unpacked on Tuesday, 10 March. And this could provide its share price with renewed strength.A bright outlookCity analysts expect the business to record a 4% earnings decline in 2019. However, they reckon Forterra will bounce back with a modest 2% rise this year. An improved 5% increase is forecasted for 2021 as well.Not only does a robust marketplace, underpinned by a chronic homes shortage and inadequate British brick supplies, look set to support Forterra over the medium-to-long term. The Northamptonshire company can look forward to its new Desford factory coming online too, a move that’ll supercharge brick production in the years ahead.The production line is set to start rolling at its state-of-the-art facility in 2022, becoming Europe’s largest with an annual capacity of 180m bricks. The move will drive group production capacity around 16% higher and allow the company to capitalise on rising homebuilder activity in the new decade. The government seeks to create 300,000 new homes by the middle of the 2020s.In my book, Forterra’s low forward P/E ratio of 13.7 times fails to reflect these bright growth prospects.Above-average dividend yieldsForterra might not be the most exciting income stock and certainly doesn’t offer the biggest dividends yields. Still, yields over the next couple of years outstrip the UK mid-cap average of 3%. For 2020, the reading sits at 3.3% and, for 2021, a yield of 3.5% can be expected.What makes the business such an appealing income share to me is the likelihood of stronger and sustained dividend growth. Forterra boasts the sort of tremendous cash generation that allows it to light a fire under shareholder rewards.Cash from operations leapt 15% year-on-year in the first half of 2019, to £27.6m. This helped the amount of net debt on its books to plummet, to £34.5m from £51.9m. And, as a result, Forterra raised the interim dividend by more than a fifth (21.2% to be exact). Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. I’d buy this low-cost stock and its chunky dividends for my ISA right now! Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997”center_img I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Image source: Getty Images. Enter Your Email Address Royston Wild owns shares in Ibstock. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Ibstock. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Royston Wild | Thursday, 27th February, 2020 | More on: FORT last_img read more

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The Micro Focus share price has doubled in a month. I’d keep buying

first_imgSimply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. See all posts by Roland Head Image source: Getty Images Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. The Micro Focus share price has doubled in a month. I’d keep buying Roland Head has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Micro Focus. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool.center_img Enter Your Email Address I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares The Micro Focus International (LSE: MCRO) share price has doubled in just one month. The shares are up by 15% today as I write, even though the software company hasn’t issued any new trading information.Is this the start of a stunning comeback for this former FTSE 100 share, which was valued at more than £10bn a few years ago?5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…I certainly think that Micro Focus shares should be worth more. However, I do think there are a couple of risks that may limit the eventual value of this business.Gaining pace?On 18 November, Micro Focus gave a trading update for the year to 31 October. The company said that revenue for the year would be around $3bn, but that profit margins would be “towards the upper end of management expectations”.The news sent the Micro Focus share price up by 30% on the day. The stock has since risen by another 40%, as investors buy in to CEO Stephen Murdoch’s vision of a more efficient and focused business.It’s still early days, as the company is less than one year into Mr Murdoch’s three-year turnaround plan. But with the shares trading on just four times forecast earnings for 2021, I think there’s still room for further gains.What I’d watchAs I mentioned, I have a couple of concerns about Micro Focus shares.The first issue is that this business isn’t showing many signs of growth. Although this is a software business, its main activity is helping companies maintain and develop older IT systems. Often, this includes digital transformation. Mostly, this means making old tech work with modern online services.The last time the company reported any sales growth was 2018. Since then, revenue (reported in dollars) has fallen from $4.754bn to about $3bn in 2020. The latest broker forecasts for 2021 suggest that revenue will slip lower again next year, to $2.834bn.Businesses that are in decline generally attract low valuations, even if they remain profitable. Mr Murdoch hopes to return Micro Focus to growth. I think there’s a good chance he’ll succeed, but it’s not a certainty.Micro Focus share price: don’t forget debtIf the shares continue to trade at current levels, I wouldn’t be surprised to see Micro Focus become a bid target. But anyone buying the company would need to buy its debt as well as its shares.The group had net debt in GBP of £3.2bn at the end of October. Adding this to the Micro Focus market cap of £1.7bn gives a total value for the business of about £5bn. This is known as the enterprise value — it’s the total commitment someone buying the whole company would have to make.How much is Micro Focus worth? I can’t say for sure, but I believe that even with the current debt load, this business is worth more than the current share price suggests.So, I’d hold the stock at 500p and monitor the performance of the business as we head into 2021. I think there could be more to come from this turnaround. Roland Head | Monday, 7th December, 2020 | More on: MCRO last_img read more

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AXIS Re Welcomes Kavan Tucker as Sr. Underwriter, Mortgage

first_img Twitter Facebook Pinterest TAGS  AXIS Re Welcomes Kavan Tucker as Sr. Underwriter, Mortgage Facebook WhatsApp Pinterestcenter_img By Digital AIM Web Support – February 23, 2021 PEMBROKE, Bermuda–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Feb 23, 2021– AXIS Re, the reinsurance business segment of AXIS Capital Holdings Limited (“AXIS Capital” or the “Company”) (NYSE: AXS), today announced the hiring of Kavan Tucker to the AXIS Re Global Markets team as a Senior Mortgage Underwriter, effective March 1, 2021. “We’re delighted to welcome Kavan Tucker to AXIS Re, Global Markets,” said Ann Haugh, Global Markets President for AXIS Re. “Kavan brings nearly 20 years of industry experience to AXIS Re with a background in mortgage as well as specialty, property, and ILS. His track record in specialty underwriting and experience in mortgage reinsurance will be a valuable asset to our team as we continue to drive our strategy forward and further grow and build on this portfolio.” In his new role, Mr. Tucker will be responsible for developing and maintaining a profitable Mortgage book of business, with a focus on U.S. Government-Sponsored Enterprises (GSE) and Mortgage Insurer transactions, while also fostering key client and broker relationships. Mr. Tucker joins AXIS Re most recently from an ILS (re)insurance platform start-up and brings experience from companies such as AXA XL, AmTrust Financial and Flagstone Re. He will work from AXIS Re’s Bermuda office. About AXIS Capital AXIS Capital, through its operating subsidiaries, is a global provider of specialty lines insurance and treaty reinsurance with shareholders’ equity at December 31, 2020, of $5.3 billion and locations in Bermuda, the United States, Europe, Singapore and Canada. Its operating subsidiaries have been assigned a rating of “A+” (“Strong”) by Standard & Poor’s and “A” (“Excellent”) by A.M. Best. For more information about AXIS Capital, visit our website at www.axiscapital.com. Follow AXIS Capital on LinkedIn and Twitter. View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210223005689/en/ CONTACT: Investors Matt Rohrmann AXIS Capital Holdings Limited [email protected] +1 212-940-3339Media Anna Kukowski AXIS Capital Holdings Limited [email protected] +1 212-715-3574 KEYWORD: BERMUDA CARIBBEAN INDUSTRY KEYWORD: PROFESSIONAL SERVICES INSURANCE FINANCE SOURCE: AXIS Capital Copyright Business Wire 2021. PUB: 02/23/2021 09:00 AM/DISC: 02/23/2021 09:01 AM http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210223005689/en Twitter WhatsApp Local NewsBusiness Previous articleExchangeRight Achieves 100% Rent Collections in 2020 for All of Its Net-Leased OfferingsNext articleTeradata Joins Open Manufacturing Platform Digital AIM Web Supportlast_img read more

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Privacy And Puttaswamy For The People’s Palate: Part 2 Of 3

first_imgColumnsPrivacy And Puttaswamy For The People’s Palate: Part 2 Of 3 Kartikeya Sharma12 Aug 2020 11:24 PMShare This – xThe first part broke down opinions of Chelameswar J. and Sapre J. wherein the former examined the existence of the right to privacy within the contours of the Constitution, limiting the discussion to the existence of the same and the latter examined the foundation of the right on the basis of the Preamble and certain elements of Part III. In the second part of this series, I will…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe first part broke down opinions of Chelameswar J. and Sapre J. wherein the former examined the existence of the right to privacy within the contours of the Constitution, limiting the discussion to the existence of the same and the latter examined the foundation of the right on the basis of the Preamble and certain elements of Part III. In the second part of this series, I will attempt to simplify the opinions of Bobde J. (as he then was) and Kaul J. Bobde J.’s opinion In the very first line of the opinion, the gravity of the situation is made crystal clear, the balance needed to be struck between the freedom and liberty guaranteed to each individual under the Constitution and the Aadhaar scheme of the Government of India which is the world’s largest exercise to gather and collect data on personal identity and biometric information. Bobde J., like Chelameswar J., is of the opinion that the judgments in M.P. Sharma and Kharak Singh do not state that there is no fundamental right to privacy in the Constitution. This is based on the reasoning that neither M.P. Sharma nor Kharak Singh had the benefit of a plethora of judgments starting with R.C. Cooper v. Union of India[1] and the judgment in Maneka Gandhi which finally undid the ‘compartmentalized rights’ theory that held the field since Gopalan. Gobind which came in 1975 had slightly moved away from the conclusions arrived at in M.P. Sharma and Kharak Singh and was inclined to declare the right to privacy as a fundamental right. But the Court proceeded cautiously as M.P. Sharma and Kharak Singh had not been overruled and this led to confusion regarding the ultimate stance taken by the Court in Gobind. The argument of the Union of India that the right to privacy may at best be a common law right but could not be a fundamental right under the Constitution was answered by delving into a jurisprudential study of the concept of ‘right’. The views of John Salmond and Roscoe Pound are considered wherein the former opines that rights are interests that are sought to be protected on moral grounds irrespective of whether there exists a legal system or not, they are termed as natural rights[2]. Meanwhile, the latter distinguishes between natural rights and legal rights on the ground that natural rights are interests which are neither created by law nor by the State and legal rights are interests which are indeed a creation of the law and are thus, the work of the State. Therefore, the conclusion that is arrived at per this analysis is that privacy is an inalienable right which is invariably involved with two integral, universal values- dignity and autonomy. It is then differentiated between the powers and functioning of the present set up of a democratic State and the erstwhile common law monarch. While the power of the former is diffused and spread out over various organs each of which have their limitations and element of autonomy in functioning, the latter involved a single, tangible entity, the sovereign who was considered the fountain of all laws deriving their authority from a higher power. The most important distinction was that the subjects under the monarch were no more subjects, but became citizens with the power to elect their own representatives to form the government, a concept well summarized by the phrase ‘We, the people’. Bobde J. takes this discussion forward by alluding to the accountability in the functioning of the government which led to a problem of enforcement of common law rights against this diffused, omnipresent body. This is where the fundamental rights in Part III come in, providing an armor of protection to the citizens by invoking the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court and the High Courts under Article 32 and Article 226 of the Constitution respectively. It is a well-accepted practice that the Constitution is empowered to protect natural rights qua the State.[3] Using this, Bobde J. dismantles the argument put forth by the Union of India, that a right must either be a common law right or a fundamental right. He believes that the distinction is very narrow and lies in the entity against which an aggrieved individual may proceed- in case of a violation of fundamental right, it is the State which is responsible and in case of a common law right, a private entity may be proceeded against in the appropriate forum. Similarly, a valued interest may at the same time be a common law right and a fundamental right, and the remedy would lie accordingly depending on the entity that is interfering with the valued interest. Bobde J. opines that privacy as a right is expansive much like many other rights in Part III, like the right to equality under Article 14. It is then attempted to define what privacy is. As per Black’s Law Dictionary,” Privacy is the condition or state of being free from public attention to intrusion into or interference with one’s acts or decisions”. The right seems to be hinged upon being left alone and free from interference, both of which are applicable in the private sphere but may extend to the public sphere insofar as a bubble around an individual exists to allow him to function and think freely. References to ancient texts and practices are made to indicate the respect for privacy from time immemorial.[4] An interesting bit of weaving and interpretation is done here. Privacy as has been established, is excluding others before an individual proceeds to conduct an activity, eg. sleep, eat or work. This essentially means that it is the pre-requisite for any activity and these activities include the enjoyment of fundamental rights. Therefore, ‘personal liberty’, i.e. freedom to exist sans interference would be empty and lifeless. In Francis Coralie Mullin v. Administrator, Union Territory of Delhi[5], the view that was taken by the Court was that ‘life’ must mean something more than mere animal existence, including the faculties of thinking and feeling. This was relied upon by Bobde J. to establish the deep ties between dignity and ‘life’ as defined above and leads to the inevitable conclusion that life as per Article 21 does not exist without privacy. In this manner, the individual dependence of ‘life’ and ‘personal liberty’ was established. Next, it was shown how privacy may be construed as a ‘travelling right’ which is to say that it is also the foundation of rights outside Article 21 as well for example, exercising the freedom of speech and expression under Article 19(1)(a) would not be possible without possessing the necessary faculties to think, read and write, all of which may only be honed in a zone of privacy. The same would even apply to a collective right such as the freedom to assemble peaceably under Article 19(1)(b) as privacy would be a necessary pre-requisite to exclude anyone who may not peaceful. Further, Articles 25 and 26 guarantees the right to freely profess, practice and propagate religion and the right of every religious denomination to maintain institutions for religious and charitable purposes, to manage its own affairs respectively. These two integral rights would be rendered null and void if there was no freedom from interference, i.e. privacy, built into the rights. Using examples of rights that have been enumerated under the umbrella of Article 21[6], Bobde J. demonstrates that the ambit of personal liberty is expanding continuously and many a right may find a place in the shadow of the tree that is Article 21. The ill-conceived notion that recognition of the right to privacy would inhibit the exercise of the Union’s powers was debunked straight away on the ground that only once the right to privacy was recognized, would the implications on the Union’s powers be considered. Further, it was no one’s case that the right was absolute in nature which was immediately pointed out. Reasonable restrictions to protect and give effect to a compelling state interest may always be put, like the other rights under Part III. Bobde J. propounds two essential items that make up privacy- choice and specification. Choice would entail which of the various activities an individual would like to undertake in furtherance of their liberty, and to specify whether they want to include anyone in their circle when performing them or exclude everyone completely. To check whether a claim for privacy arises, choice and specification would be taken into account in the establishment of the intent of an individual to be ‘private’ or not. As for the test used to review the right to privacy, the standard test used for a right under Article 21, i.e. ‘fair, just and reasonable’ as per Maneka Gandhi. But, he adds, since this right is the foundation for many other Part III rights, when an interference in those rights takes place, the test that is used to curtail those rights will be looked at in addition to the test applicable under Article 21. Kaul J.’s opinion The human being, originally an individual creature transformed into what Plato famously remarked as a ‘social animal’. Kaul J. opines that as a result of this, an individual was now bound by certain societal norms which may overlap with the right to be left alone to do as one pleases. The evolution of society led to the advent and development of technology and the opinion seeks to dwell upon the nuances of the relationship between technology and privacy. In a nutshell, Kaul J. describes privacy as an inherent right which is about respecting an individual and that it would be undesirable to ignore a person’s wishes without there being a compelling cause to do so. An important aspect of privacy is the individual’s desire to control the outward flow of personal information which becomes relevant in the 21st century. The information age heralded an era of easy access to information via the internet, bringing individuals closer but, at the same time the case for privacy protection became stronger. Technology has enabled the State to invade upon an individual’s private space using surveillance, profiling based on preferences etc. and Edward Snowden’s revelations were a testament to the degree of invasion. The larger threat being, the infringement of privacy by non-State actors and examples such as Uber, Facebook, Alibaba and Airbnb were cited by Kaul J. to highlight the information that such aggregators possess and the digital footprint being created by every individual as a result of digital economies being born only seems to be getting bigger and bigger. After alluding to the threat of big data accompanied by a possible abuse of information, it is stressed that there is an emergent need for regulation of use, storage, and processing of information by non-State actors. Kaul J. thereafter changes gears and enters the zone of constitutional discourse. It is opined that the jurisprudence of constitutional democracies around the world is based on justice for all which manifests itself in many qualities such as equality, dignity, fraternity, reasonableness, and fairness. The spirit of justice influenced the framers of the Indian Constitution and the framers paid the ultimate tribute by inserting the fundamental rights as Part III. The Constitution was drafted in a manner that it would survive the test of time and would reflect the change in sentiments or desire and would take into its fold any new rights that may emerge in the future. It is conceded that at the time of drafting of the Constitution, privacy may not have been envisaged as a part of the bundle of rights in Part III. A caveat was put forth, that in the future there may be debates and discussions on whether a certain right is fundamental or not but, it would be remiss to forget that the Constitution was meant to be an all encompassing document covering all those rights that are considered essential for ‘peaceful, harmonious and orderly social living’. Kaul J. comes back to the aspect of dissemination of personal information stating that unlike before, barriers are not only physical but also, informational. As per him, most information regarding an individual would fall under the category of ‘none of your business’ and in case an individual willingly provides information, it would come attached with an implied covenant of trust. Freedom in a democracy is the existence of autonomy and control over one’s actions and now, freedom to control information would be severely handicapped if the individual is kept in the dark about how his information is being used and the manner in which his actions are being monitored. It is opined that while an individual has an established right to protect false and mischievous information from being circulated he also has a right to have certain truths withheld from public as these may lead to unnecessary and half baked conclusions that may be troublesome in nature. For example, the sexual relationships of celebrities may be of interest to public but, would not fall under the definition of ‘public interest’ thus, would be a breach of privacy. An important point highlighted is the permanency of information once it has been put on the internet. In the pre-digital era, it was easier for an individual to be forgotten but, now slipping into oblivion seems to be a relic of the past. The General Data Protection Regulation of the European Union recognized the right to be forgotten but, it would not be absolute as certain information would be necessary for performing tasks of public importance like the census or for activities in the area of public health. Kaul J. attempts to assuage the concerns of infringement of privacy by the State by providing a four pronged test- (i) action must be sanctioned by law, (ii) action must be necessary for the purpose sought to be achieved, (iii) interference must be proportional to the need and (iv) procedural safeguard must be in place to protect against abuse of interference. It can be deduced that (i) and (iv) would go hand in hand as the word ‘law’ would have to conform to the established understanding of the word as per the Court’s interpretation of Article 21, which states that a law must be just, fair and reasonable which would cover most, if not all the procedural safeguards in (iv). Right to privacy would be subject to enough and more checks in the form of other fundamental rights, national security, public interest including scientific or historical research purposes or statistical purposes, the need to allow the authorities to conduct criminal investigations etc. Concluding his opinion, Kaul J. states that the essential check and balance on the right to privacy would be no harm to another individual or adversely affecting their rights. Further, it was left to future cases to establish the inter-play between privacy and other fundamental rights. The opinion of Chandrachud J. is relied upon to emphasize the incorrect interpretation by the Court in Suresh Kumar Koushal v. Naz Foundation to uphold Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code on the ground that merely a small fraction of the country’s population constitute the LGBT community[7] and it is held in the present opinion that the majoritarian theory would not apply to constitutional rights as it is the duty of the Court to protect the rights of the few as it has been, on occasion termed as a counter majoritarian institution. Conclusion Bobde J. is known as a judge who writes few opinions, but when he does, he displays a keen understanding of jurisprudence and constitutional mechanics, like he has done so in this case. Every question that is raised before him is answered in detail by going to the root of the issue, without digressing and breaching areas not under scrutiny for the purposes of this opinion. There is a clear and distinct flow to the opinion- the difference between a natural right and a legal right is briefly examined, arriving at the conclusion that privacy is natural right, then distinguishing between a democracy and a monarchy on the nature of governance which invariably leads to the concept of accountability which is intertwined with the concept of rights and how they are enforced. The discussion then moves onto privacy as a Part III right and how it behaves vis-à-vis other Part III rights as there seems to be apparent connection between the Part III rights and privacy as a concept. The opinion put forth by Kaul J. takes a modern day understanding of privacy to study its relationship with technology and its 21st century invasiveness. In this opinion he displays his command and control over a myriad of subjects such as data privacy, data regulation, Constitutional liberties and draws from a wide range of sources, both old and contemporary to emphasize the importance of privacy in the digital age. The opinion reflects a grasp on issues such as invasion by the State and the increasing danger of non- State actors which entails surveillance and profiling by the former and harvesting of data by the latter. Kaul J.’s commitment to protecting individual liberties and keeping them on a high pedestal is well known (as seen in Perumal Murugan and M.F. Hussain). In the present case, the respect for fundamental rights reveals itself with a comparison of Part III rights as the ‘grand throne’ of the Constitution. This opinion set the tone for the emergent discussion on the nuances of privacy in the Indian context by alluding to the heralding of a digital economy and the influence of ‘big data’. Views are personal only.(Author is a Law graduate from National Law University, Jodhpur) [1] (1970) 1 SCC 248 [2] PJ Fitzgerald, Salmond on Jurisprudence, 217 (Twelfth Edition, 1966) [3] Kesavananda Bharati v. State of Kerala, (1973) 4 SCC 225, 1461 at p. 783 (Mathew J.) [4] The Arthashastra prohibits entry into another’s house, without the owner’s consent, the Hadith makes it reprehensible to read correspondence between others and in Christianity, the confession of one’s sins is a private act. [5] (1981) 1 SCC 608 [6] A few examples are, Right against solitary confinement, Sunil Batra v. Delhi Administration, (1978) 4 SCC 494 Right against custodial violence, Sheela Barse v. State of Maharashtra, (1983) 2 SCC 96 [7] This judgment was overruled by the judgment in Navtej Singh Johar v. Union of India, AIR 2018 SC 4321 Next Storylast_img read more

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Man accused of pouring bleach on groceries nabbed by FBI

first_imgFBI(LOS ANGELES) — A California man was in FBI custody on Monday after allegedly pouring bleach on food items at several grocery stores in California.David Lohr, 48, was arrested in Northern California on Feb. 6 on suspicion of adding harmful substances to grocery store items in the Los Angeles area, FBI officials said in a statement released Monday.FBI investigators described Lohr as a transient who may have been involved in similar tampering incidents in other areas including Orange County, California, and Phoenix.Deputies with the Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Office arrested Lohr at a bus stop in Sunnyvale, California, about 12 miles northwest of San Jose, after receiving complaints about a man spreading white powder, later determined to be salt, and hydrogen peroxide on a public bus, the FBI said.Deputies later determined that Lohr had allegedly “poured hydrogen peroxide on or near rotisserie chickens” at a nearby grocery store, the statement said. He’s also accused of pouring bleach into supermarket refrigerators and freezers.The alleged multi-day crime spree began Dec. 14 at a supermarket in Manhattan Beach, California, where surveillance footage shows a man emptying a bottle of bleach into a refrigerator with cases of beer, according to a criminal complaint. He allegedly poured bleach on a bag of ice at another grocery store two days later.“The federal complaint filed in Los Angeles alleges that in December 2018 and January 2019, Lohr was seen on surveillance videos pouring bleach into refrigerators and freezers containing packaged consumer products (such as ice, alcoholic beverages, and packaged frozen seafood) at supermarket locations in multiple cities,” the FBI statement said. “Some customers reported smelling bleach on products. Tampered packages were subsequently destroyed.”“To date,” the statement continued, “there have been no known reports of individuals sickened by Lohr’s actions; however, further investigation has determined that Lohr has done this in a variety of stores, and the extent of his actions are currently under investigation.”Lohr is being held at Santa Clara County Jail in San Jose on federal tampering charges and is expected to appear in U.S. District Court on Friday.It’s unclear if he’s retained an attorney.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Experts warn of lurking danger after several deadly avalanches in the backcountry

first_imgaluxum/iStockBy MEREDITH DELISO, ABC News(NEW YORK) — A weak base layer of snow, combined with an increased interest in backcountry skiing during the COVID-19 pandemic, has likely contributed to one of the deadliest weeks for avalanches in U.S. history, experts said.From Jan. 31 to Feb. 6, 14 people died after getting caught in avalanches — marking it the deadliest week in the U.S. since 1910 for the accidents, according to the National Avalanche Center.As of Feb. 10, 22 people have died from avalanches this winter, with over half occurring in Utah and Colorado, according to the Colorado Avalanche Information Center. In the deadliest among them, in Utah’s Salt Lake Valley on Feb. 6, four people died after triggering an avalanche, while another four managed to escape, authorities said.During last year’s winter season, 23 people died in avalanches, according to the center.Some common threads have emerged from this season’s tragic incidents. They were often experienced backcountry explorers who triggered avalanches as they navigated regions outside of resort boundaries. In some cases, they were equipped with potentially life-saving gear like avalanche airbags (to buy some precious time if fully buried in the snow), transceivers or beacons to help locate buried victims and probes and shovels to then dig them out. But despite rescue or resuscitation efforts, many victims died.The accidents also occurred during a season that experts have warned is especially prone to dangerous avalanches. A dry start to the winter, with not much snowfall, created a very weak base layer of the snowpack across the western U.S. As snow builds on top of that weak layer, avalanches are easier to trigger, and may also be wider, Ethan Greene, director of the Colorado Avalanche Information Center, told ABC News.“These conditions are not unique. They’re not unprecedented, but they’re also not common,” said Greene, who characterized the avalanche conditions in Colorado as a “1-in-10” event. “So if you’ve been recreated in Colorado in the wintertime for 20 years, this may be the second time that you’ve seen a wave that’s just like this one.”At the same time, the pandemic may be helping drive people into backcountry regions, where, unlike at resorts, avalanche mitigation measures are nonexistent.Adrian Ballinger, founder of Alpenglow Expeditions, an adventure school based in California’s Squaw Valley near Lake Tahoe, has seen a “massive” increase in backcountry skiing this winter. His company’s guided backcountry skiing program has had more than double the participants this season, and his avalanche education program — which had expanded to 650 students from 350 last season — sold out by December.He said the COVID-19 pandemic has helped fuel increased interest in the “powder paradise.”“Many of the resorts put in place reservation systems or aren’t even selling day tickets this year to lessen the number of people there to try to meet COVID regulations,” he said. “Even if they were allowed to go to the resort, a lot of people just don’t want to be around that many people. So the idea of the backcountry is attractive, and I think that’s speeding up a trend of the past decade.”With more people in the backcountry, Ballinger has heard anecdotally from peers that more experienced skiers may be trying to “avoid those crowds by going deeper, bigger than they normally would at this time of year” to find fresh, untracked slopes.Ballinger said he thinks it’s a positive that more people are interested in the backcountry — it is his life’s work, after all.“But of course when it happens all at once and in a season with a really dangerous snowpack, there’s a lot of additional risk,” he said.There are ways to manage that risk, backcountry experts said. In addition to education to recognize avalanche terrain and conditions, using an experienced guide and going out with the right equipment, skiers should heed reports put out by avalanche forecasters that warn of avalanche danger on any given day.“Right now, with the type of snowpack, the way to reduce the risk is to simply avoid where the avalanche dragon lives,” Craig Gordon, an avalanche forecaster with the Utah Avalanche Center for two decades, told ABC News. “Simply knowing where potential lies to trigger a slide that’s going to be deep and wide and unmanageable, we can avoid it. We can manage the given avalanche problem that we have through our terrain choices.”Gordon said that skiers may have a false sense of security if they are carrying rescue gear, when the main objective should be avoiding an avalanche in the first place.“It’s like, everybody wants to know CPR, but you don’t ever want to have to use it,” he said.With several more weeks of the season still to go, Ballinger hopes backcountry skiers will exercise caution and “reel it in.”“The danger is still absolutely lurking out there,” Ballinger said. “We’re all about to get more snow. And so that adds risk because of more weight on the snowpack, and it adds excitement. For most of us, we haven’t skied that much powder this year.”Greene also stressed that people check the avalanche forecast before they go out into the backcountry.“It’s really important to make sure to know what the conditions are going to be, what you expect to see, and to make sure what you’re doing fits that,” he said.Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Assistant Professor (Non-Tenure Track), Department of Neurosurgery (03-318-021)

first_imgWe value diversity and how it enriches our academic andscientific community and strive toward cultivating an inclusiveenvironment that supports all employees. Assistant Professor (Non-Tenure Track), Department ofNeurosurgery (03-318-021):The Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Maryland Schoolof Medicine is actively recruiting a full-time Board eligible/BoardCertified neurosurgeon with specific interests in neurotrauma andspinal disorders.Candidates should be eligible for an unrestricted license in theState of Maryland and have completed fellowship-level training incomplex and/or minimally invasive spine surgery. This positionrequires a medical degree from a recognized accredited domesticuniversity (or foreign equivalent), a strong commitment to patientcare, clear and focused research interests, and demonstratedexcellence in teaching and ability to work effectively within ateam setting.Expected rank for this position will be Assistant Professor,however, final rank and tenure status will be commensurate withselected candidate’s experience.For immediate consideration, please submit a cover letter and arecent CV, including names and contact information of threereferences.For additional questions after application, please [email protected] :UMB is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. Allqualified applicants will receive consideration for employmentwithout regard to sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, race,color, religion, national origin, disability, protected Veteranstatus, age, or any other characteristic protected by law orpolicy.last_img read more

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Depressed fathers impact children’s development

first_imgFathers suffering from Post-Natal Depression (PND) respond more negatively to their children, and could therefore affect their developement, according to a study by researchers at the University of Oxford.Experts studied the behaviour of 38 fathers from Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire, 19 of whom suffered from depression, and 19 of whom didn’t. They filmed a three minute interaction between child and father and attempted to draw conclusions from its content. The team claimed they were looking for three things, namely, “more speech focused on paternal experience and less on the infant’s experience, increased negativity, in terms of more negative and critical comments about the infant and about the self, and fewer comments relating to the infant’s mental state, i.e. feelings, beliefs, intentions and desires.”Typical examples included: “I’m not able to make you smile”, “Daddy’s not as good as Mummy”, “Are you tired?”, and “Can’t think of anything to do all of a sudden”.The proportion of comments showing some negativity rose from an average of 11% among fathers without depression to 19% in fathers with depression. The proportion of the fathers’ comments that were focused on the baby dropped from 72% to 60%, while the proportion that focused on themselves rose from 14% to 24%. Dr Paul Ramchandani, a lead researcher, was keen to highlight that the research was a pilot project. “This particular paper had 38 participants, which is a limitation, and partly for this reason in the paper we urge that the findings should be interpreted with some caution,” he warned.He defended the seemingly short period of interaction chosen, three minutes, by claiming that “infants can find it challenging to do much longer.”The study comes in the wake of 2010 research by the Medical Research Council, which found that 3% of the 85,000 fathers considered suffered from PND. The label PND caused some controversy in a review of the research in The Guardian. The team clarified, “We do not actually use the term postnatal depression (PND) in men, as it isn’t really all that useful.” Experts stated that although the conclusion of the research may seem like common sense, the emphasis is of the project is to “look to the future.”Their next step is to examine the impact of depression on children throughout their development, and to design early interventions to aid fathers in the way they play and talk with their infants.last_img read more

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Ivy Tech & Deaconess Announce Partnership to Benefit Employees

first_imgThere will be no out-of-pocket tuition costs for Deaconess employees to participate in the program. Tuition will be covered by a combination of financial aid and tuition reimbursement. Another benefit that all employees will receive is deferred tuition (which will cover any initial fees) and in-state tuition rates regardless of their location. Ivy Tech Community College and Deaconess Health System announced an innovative new partnership today, Achieve Your Degree. The Deaconess Achieve Your Degree program will provide guidance and financial assistance to any Deaconess Health System employee interested in pursuing an education at Ivy Tech Community College. “Employers across the state are struggling to find qualified and skilled workers. With the Achieve Your Degree program, Ivy Tech Community College is helping employers to develop that talent from within,” said Ivy Tech Chancellor, Jonathan Weinzapfel. “In addition, by participating in the Achieve your Degree program, Deaconess is investing in their employees and helping them to grow both personally and professionally.”FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare “We are excited to expand our partnership with Ivy Tech Community College and provide our staff the opportunity to further their education and skills training,” said Linda E. White, President and CEO of Deaconess Health System. “Participation in Achieve Your Degree will produce well-educated health care professionals in a variety of important fields while simultaneously addressing the need for post-secondary education.  It’s a win-win situation for our entire community.” The Achieve your Degree program is open to all Deaconess employees who are eligible for tuition reimbursement, and they can begin participating immediately. Employees will also be able to start classes during Ivy Tech’s spring semester, which begins on January 11, 2016. Participants will be encouraged to pursue coursework that is applicable to their current or desired position at Deaconess, and it is anticipated that Nursing, Surgical Technology, CNA, Phlebotomy, Medical Assisting, and Paramedic Science will be among the most frequently selected programs.last_img read more

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