Rugby DVD Review – England 35 Australia 18: The 2010 Cook Cup

first_imgBUY IT AT:  amazon.co.ukGo Entertainment         £7.99 LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Relive England’s finest hour since the 2003 World Cup, the day when, in Stuart Barnes’s words, “England restored its rugby pride and Twickenham found its blood”. Croft soared, Lawes marauded, Youngs sniped, Ashton dashed – and Johnno’s men gave the Aussies a rare pasting. This DVD features Sky’s coverage of the match last November, from build-up to post-match interviews.RW RATING 3/5last_img read more

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England worthy of measured praise

first_imgWayne Smith, who helped mastermind the All Blacks’ 2011 World Cup win before building a dynasty with the Chiefs by recording back-to-back Super 15 titles, possesses one of the most astute rugby brains on the planet. He has been quietly impressed with England and, with his Kiwi hat on, is rather wary.Wales are resurgent and avenging last season’s Millennium Stadium Slam-busting is essential. However, we won’t find out for sure whether England are potential world-beaters until this summer’s excruciatingly tough series in New Zealand. Until then, be assured that this buzz of excitement is neither based on one game nor the product of empty-headed arrogance. All of the praise has been earned. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Surveying the troops: Stuart Lancaster casts his eyes over the England squad in training last weekBy Charlie Morgan“Let’s all laugh at England. One win and they think they’re world-beaters.”If you’ve managed to scan social media this week, the chances are that this sentiment – or something similar – has popped up. In the wake of a nerve-shredding 13-10 defeat of Ireland at Twickenham last Saturday, there has been a bit of criticism knocking around.Rather than acknowledge an exceptional victory forged from dogged defence, a powerful pack and one razor-sharp piece of attacking opportunism, some punters have preferred to scoff at Stuart Lancaster’s set-up. Jibes about the scrum – undeniably dismantled by Cian Healy – and a couple of Billy Twelvetrees knock-ons were prominent.On top: Ireland’s scrum troubled England’s packArrogance is a trait that others simply love to pin on rugby people from these shores, so the majority of acclaim for a fine performance was immediately earmarked as sensationalistic and overblown.Wales Online were quick off the mark. One article entitled “Eleven pieces of English rugby hyperbole after Ireland win” ran on Monday and began by confronting Sir Clive Woodward’s column – an easy target. From there though, the piece descended into farce. “Resurgent England on the up” was held up as a ‘hyperbolic’ headline. Bizarre.Lazy clichés surrounding English egotism are even odder when you consider Lancaster’s personality. Championing sheer hard work, the former schoolteacher has transformed the national side from a total shambles into a disciplined, proud outfit.Ironically, one aspect of the current Six Nations that is helping England in that regard has been injuries. The absence of Manu Tuilagi, Geoff Parling, Christian Wade and Marland Yarde has seen Luther Burrell, Dave Attwood, Jonny May and Jack Nowell emerge – a quartet that will now take some shifting.David Wilson and Henry Thomas now get exposure at tighthead, too. In terms of raw materials – speed and athleticism – Tom Croft is a freakish talent. Figuring out a way to fit in the loping Leicester Tiger when he returns from a knee construction is a welcome problem. Likewise with Alex Corbisiero.No.8 is another area where a dark cloud has presented a silver lining. Any nation would be worse off for losing Billy Vunipola in light of two destructive displays in Paris and Edinburgh. With Ben Morgan firing and ready to anchor the scrum though, England are better placed than they were to face Wales a year ago. Slotting in: No 8 Ben MorganA 30-3 humiliation in Cardiff was brought about largely by back-row imbalance – Tom Wood covering in the eight shirt and leaving England bereft of a burly carrier. Sam Warburton and Justin Tipuric ran riot. Add Morgan into the equation and everything changes. On Sunday, the hosts will be devastated if they fail to clinch a Triple Crown for the first time since 2003.It would be fitting if this team can draw a line through another record from that year – for the first time since the Woodward days, there is a feeling of sustainable quality about England, especially considering the verve with ball in hand that is finally complementing their tenacity.In his customarily understated way, Lancaster this week accepted how important this current competition may be.“Obviously you want as many of your big guns playing as possible,” he said. “The likes of Manu, Tom Croft, Marland Yarde and Alex Corbisiero aren’t around. But when we look back at this period in 18 months, we’ll actually be thankful that we’ve had this opportunity to blood other players and find out about them in big games.”Clearly, there is no danger of complacency or delusion – whatever the stereotypes. Nobody will attempt to shirk responsibility or evade problems. Graham Rowntree’s solemn expression at full-time of the Ireland success (markedly juxtaposed with the jubilation of Lancaster and Andy Farrell) evidenced those scrum worries and a determination to put right a record of four losses against the head from nine put-ins.The link between fly-half and midfield must also be sharpened. George Ford may have been trumpeted as a mini-Messiah, but Alex Goode comprehensively outplayed him on Friday evening at The Rec – and that after Saracens’ stand-in No 10 filled in for Charlie Hodgson with 30 seconds’ notice. At least Lancaster is savvy enough to know what an intelligent, classy footballer Goode is.Aware of the issues: Rowntree, Lancaster and FarrellIn short, England are in a very good place and the press are completely correct to offer measured compliments. It isn’t hyperbolic to be cautiously optimistic. Besides, public opinion won’t affect what goes on at Pennyhill Park anyway. LONDON, ENGLAND – FEBRUARY 22: (back row L-R) Forwards coach Graham Rowntree, head coach Stuart Lancaster and backs coach Andy Farrell of England look on during the RBS Six Nations match between England and Ireland at Twickenham Stadium on February 22, 2014 in London, England. (Photo by David Rogers – RFU/The RFU Collection via Getty Images) last_img read more

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Shane Williams on England vs Wales

first_img Shane Williams on England vs WalesWhat is your view on the Welsh back-line in particular, especially considering all the injuries. There are no changes at the moment despite George North coming back so, what are your views on that?Obviously a lot was said about the injuries and the form of players, but I’m positive after the weekend. The game plan was to move the ball and have a good tempo, score tries and get points and that’s exactly what they did.The style fits the players they have and the no changes, it shows Warren (Gatland) has faith and shows the strength in the team. To be honest the injuries beforehand may have been a blessing in disguise.Related: Wales Team to Face England So who do you think will win between England and Wales this weekend?I think it will be a good game, close, we certainly have the potential to win. I mean England are up there with New Zealand, I think they may be a little too strong but I hope I’m wrong.I think England have such strength and depth that they are there, whereas Wales are not quite there I don’t think.Corner stop: Elliot Daly scores the winning try in the closing minutes in Cardiff last year Photo: Getty ImagesLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSWhat is your opinion on the issue of injuries at the moment? Do you think players are playing more games, or they are bigger and stronger now compared to when you played?I think it is a combination of factors. I think it is more physical now, which means the collisions at impact are bigger.The players now are more athletic, sometimes you have a back-rower as quick as the backs. All of them are athletes so the margin of error is so much smaller.I also think you can predict injuries better now, they’re more conscious of it, where they scan a muscle and see a small tear so rather than play on and aggravate it they just rest them. When I played you just had to get on with it. But I think they look after players more now.What is your opinion on the new Wales eligibility rules, of players needing 60 caps to be picked for Tests if they are based overseas?I can see why the WRU have done it, they want to strengthen rugby in the regions and I think it will help there.But the only downside I can see is Rhys Webb. It was a shambles to be honest, where he signed with Toulon thinking he would still be eligible for Wales and then he found out he wasn’t.I was very annoyed at that because I think they have to be more transparent with players beforehand.Tough call: The new eligibility rule has damaged Webb’s Wales career, and was a complete shambles according to Shane (Getty Images)In terms of the Six Nations who do you think will win the tournament?England are the favourites but I think whoever wins on the weekend will win the championship. England will win against Ireland, so if they win on Saturday I think they will probably win the Grand Slam.But if Wales win their confidence will go through the roof.I genuinely believe the winner on Saturday can win the championship.Related: England Team to Face Wales  So it’s a little over a year until the World Cup, being held in Japan for the first time. Are you excited or apprehensive at how its going to be received out there?Well I am a little bit anxious in terms of the stadiums and the infrastructure, but I am fairly convinced they can sort it out. I am excited because it will be unique. It is the first World Cup in Asia and all the people are really excited.The Japanese people, they do not want to disappoint, so people really need to go out there as Japan is a lovely country.What is it about Japan that you like the most? Was it the food, the people or something else?You get used to the food – I must admit I wasn’t the biggest sushi person. Japan really is one of the most alien countries I have ever been to but for me the people really stood out.They are friendly and accommodating to the extent I wasn’t really used to, because we aren’t the most polite in the UK!But the people, there is nothing they won’t do, and it will be a unique World Cup because of that.So will the players get a bit of a culture shock?It will be a shock if they haven’t been before definitely, because its not what you’re used to, but you quickly fall into their style and just get on with business.I have been privileged enough to play in many World Cups, but I’m gutted I never got to play in one in Japan, because they really are going to make a festival out of the whole thing.On the rise: Japanese rugby in all forms has massively improved. Photo: Getty ImagesJapan have a Super Rugby team now, the Sunwolves, and of course they had that victory against South Africa in the World Cup in 2015. Is it noticeable how the game has grown there?I think it’s no secret its grown, with John Kirwan (who coached Japan from 2007 to 2011) and Eddie Jones and the national side. Actually Eddie, in particular, has been involved in its growth, and in high schools and colleges the game is strong and it’s up there now.It took a massive step up in the three years I was there, it’s great. There is more money in the infrastructure and there are more better players around.In terms of the World Cup, who do you think in the northern hemisphere can make the most noise in Japan?Again, England are the firm favorites, I mean we are still a year out but the leagues domestically have real quality. But all the teams are going in the right direction.Ireland are always there, Scotland are improving, but I do think in terms of strength and depth, England are strong.With Rugby World Cup 2019 on the horizon, Shane tackles the best Japan has to offer in his new online series Shane Williams: Big In Japan http://www.facebook.com/shanebiginjapan In an interview with Rugby World, Shane Williams discusses the 2019 World Cup, injuries and who will win the Six Nations Sumo Wrestler: Watch Shane Williams and Andy Powell try their hands at sumo wrestling in Japan (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS To discover the wonders of Japan for yourself:  http://visitjapan2019.com/ #EndlessDiscovery TAGS: Japan last_img read more

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Rugby World Cup 2019 Travel Guide: Fujinomiya

first_img Advertising FeatureRugby World Cup 2019 Travel Guide: FujinomiyaSEELake Tanuki offers spectacular views of Mount Fuji, especially when the peak is reflected in the water, and beautiful autumn foliage.The picturesque Shiraito Falls are found in the foothills of the mountain while Fujisan Hongu Sengen Taisha Shrine has more than 1,200 years of history, regards Mount Fuji as God and is close to the city centre.Historical: The Fujisan Hongu Sengen Taisha ShrineDOClimbing Mount Fuji is only advised from early July to early September, but you can hike the Hoei Crater from June to November. There is a trail from the 5th Station of Fujinomiya and when you reach the crater, which is twice the size of the Mount Fuji summit crater, you can hike to the bottom of it.Mount Fuji Ecotours offer day-long cycling outings taking in the Shiraito Falls, Satoyama village and views of Mount Fuji, with a local lunch and sake tasting included too. If you’ve got a head for heights, view Mount Fuji from the air with a tandem flight from the Asagiri Kogen Paragliding School.EATMount Fuji Brewing will open in March 2019, close to Fujisan Hongu Sengen Taisha Shrine. This restaurant will offer the craft beer produced by Mount Fuji’s spring water, as well as buffets serving a variety of dishes cooked with local ingredients.Tranquil: Shiraito FallsTOURIST WEBSITE See Mount Fuji from myriad angles in the closest city to the peak Flight for two: Paragliding TAGS: Japan fujinomiya.wpengine.comWORLD CUP VISITThere are four matches being played in the Shizuoka Prefecture at the Ecopa Stadium between 28 September and 11 October, and a visit to Fujinomiya allows you to admire Mount Fuji up close.Related: Rugby World Cup 2019 venuesGETTING THEREFujinomiya is a 20-minute drive or train journey from Fuji, which is an hour from Tokyo on the bullet train. You can also get the train from Shizuoka, changing at Fuji.DID YOU KNOW? The Mount Fuji World Heritage Centre opened in Fujinomiya in December 2017. As well as a wealth of information on the cultural significance of the mountain, there are amazing views and interactive experiences. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TOP TIPYou can get a Mount Fuji West Side Excursion Bus Ticket that gives you two days of unlimited bus travel from Fujinomiya to Kawaguchiko and discounts on attractions.last_img read more

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Pro14 Rainbow Cup to trial new laws

first_imgWhat have bosses said about the changes?David Jordan, Tournament Director of PRO14 Rugby, said: “Our Sports & Regulatory Committee have been very proactive in identifying opportunities to introduce game innovations. We’re looking forward to implementing these trials during the Guinness PRO14 Rainbow Cup.“We know these laws also have their origins from the Player Welfare Symposiums and our belief is that we will see a positive impact on the game overall.”While World Rugby CEO Alan Gilpin has applauded the tournament for taking the step.He said: “(This) will provide invaluable data and feedback to determine future advances to game spectacle and player welfare.”What do you think of these law trials? Let us know your thoughts by emailing [email protected] or get in touch via social media. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. The laws include a red card replacement and a captain’s challenge LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Pro14 Rainbow Cup to trial new lawsThe Pro14 Rainbow Cup has confirmed it will trial three new laws after they were approved by World Rugby.Super Rugby Aotearoa and Super Rugby AU already implement the laws. The Rainbow Cup will use them from the start of the tournament next weekend.What are the new laws to be implemented in the Pro14 Rainbow Cup?The new laws are:Red card replacement A team will be without a player for 20 minutes but then will be allowed to bring on a replacement. The player who received the card is not allowed to return but another star from the bench can replace them.Captain’s challenge Each team will have one challenge per match. This allows a team to challenge a try-scoring or foul play decision during the match or any refereeing decision in the last five minutes. This rule has been brought in to improve the accuracy of the match officials.Goal-line drop-out In the events of being held up over the line, knock-ons in the in-goal area and the ball being grounded in-goal by a defending player, a drop-out will occur. The drop-out, a kick, must happen on or behind the try line, happen immediately and must travel five metres. However, failure to do this will result in the opposing team requesting the kick is taken again or a five-metre scrum will take place.last_img read more

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A ‘rogue’ state

first_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Comments are closed. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR By Michael SchutPosted Dec 7, 2011 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Comments (1) New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Bath, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Tampa, FL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA A ‘rogue’ state Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI center_img Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 [Episcopal News Service] Hotel 64 on Gordon Road features a nice breakfast spread. On a recent morning, I sat next to Professor Jesse Mugambi, a theologian from Kenya, who has a slightly unnerving tendency to keep a smile on his face while speaking of things that are no laughing matter.As we started in on our granola and fruit, the professor, almost in passing, characterized the United States as a “rogue state.”  I’m in Durban, South Africa, for COP (Conference of Parties) 17, the United Nations’ 17th annual conference on climate change. And, at least where climate change is concerned, describing the United States as “rogue” doesn’t seem too far off.In the international, U.N.-related world, Professor Mugambi reminded me, states are designated rogue by the International Criminal Court. Such states are considered bullies, operating outside international law and generally accepted norms of behavior. (It’s interesting to note that the United States has not signed on as a member of the International Criminal Court.) The United States also has the unique distinction to be the only signatory country not to have ratified the Kyoto Protocol, the 1997 agreement requiring 37 industrialized countries to slash carbon emissions to 5 percent below 1990 levels by 2012. (Developing countries, under Kyoto, were never required to commit to emission reductions.)The United States has not ratified the Kyoto Protocol and yet it is far and away the world’s largest carbon emitter per capita. (Until about two years ago the U.S. was the largest emitter, period. China now carries that dubious distinction, though they of course have more than three times the population of the United States.)Rogue indeed.Earth’s immune responseOur body’s immune system protects us from infection. Not that the Durban climate change meetings were making me ill — though that would be, frankly, an understandable reaction. But they were overwhelming, confusing and, I found, discouraging, the latter partly due to my citizenship in a rogue state. After all, after 17 years of negotiations, last year’s worldwide greenhouse gas emissions were the highest ever. We’ve talked and talked, but the world gets warmer and emissions increase.I shared some of these feelings with a colleague and she reminded me of something that I often find very hopeful: that Earth too has its own “auto-immune response.” At least that’s the metaphor Paul Hawken uses in his 2007 book, Blessed Unrest, in which he compares the environmental movement to the body’s complex immune system.The Earth’s immune response to climate change, to all of the injustices suffered by creation, is seen in the explosion of non-governmental organizations across the globe, by those driven by peace and justice to work toward a more compassionate world. When Hawken speaks about his book, on a screen behind him is projected a scrolling list of organization names, which continues long after the end of his presentation.Empathy and justice, a possible cureAt the end of the first week of negotiations, I gathered with thousands of other representatives of Earth’s immune system for a civil society march through the streets of Durban. They included campesinos from Mexico; rural women farmers from across Africa; climate activists from Europe; a group of African youth who had caravanned from Nairobi to Durban; and a network of interfaith leaders.My favorite sign carried the message that empathy could cure climate change. The sign was very simple: black magic-marker letters scribbled on white tag-board. But it caught my attention. What if the climate change negotiators from more than 190 countries decided to operate out of empathy, rather than self-interest and self-protection?Empathy mixed with justice would be a good start. Empathy asks us to pay attention to the stories of others whose lives have already been impacted by climate change; justice then asks us to act on their behalf. The adverse effects of climate change can already be seen in developing countries and island nations, with indigenous people often being affected first.I witnessed this fact firsthand when in April 2010 I visited Kivalina, an Inupiaq village on a sliver of land jutting out into the Chukchi Sea above the Arctic Circle.  Sea ice used to protect Kivalina from the first of the October storms, but that’s no longer the case as ice in the Chukchi Sea now forms later in the year. And without a protective ice shield, waves batter and erode the shoreline and the village has become vulnerable to storm surge flooding. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers estimates the island will be inhabitable for only another 15 years.Kivalina, incidentally, is home to a very active and engaged Episcopal congregation.Less “rogue-ness”When you read this, the COP 17 deliberations will be coming to an end, but there is still time for the U.S. to become somewhat less of a rogue state. It’s possible that the messages from Earth’s immune system will seep in, that justice and empathy will have a say.To follow the latest outcomes of the deliberations, check out the US Climate Action Network’s website.— Michael Schut is economic and environmental affairs officer for the Episcopal Church. He attended COP 17 in Durban, South Africa. Featured Events An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Joseph F Foster says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Collierville, TN Rector Knoxville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab December 8, 2011 at 4:15 am The “International” Crimminal Kangaroo Court has no jurisdiction in the United States, nor will it. You bet the United States have (yes, I wrote ‘have’) not “signed on” nor will they. And the Capital City (Kyoto) Treaty was rigged. These people are pushing for a one world state. Rector Belleville, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more

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Los adultos jóvenes adultos y los jóvenes dejan una marca…

first_img Submit an Event Listing Youth & Young Adults Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Participantes en el Festival de los jóvenes adultos discuten la legislación del día durante una sesión con María Getz, coordinadora de comunicaciones en línea de la Oficina de Relaciones gubernamentales de la Iglesia Episcopal en Washington, DC. Foto/Sharon Sheridan[Episcopal News Service – Indianápolis] “¿Usted no ha oído hablar de Bonnie Ball?”Los jóvenes se apresuraron a tirar de un sitio web en un teléfono celular para mostrar a la Presidente de la Cámara de los Deputados de la Convención General, Bonnie Anderson, cómo los que se dirigían a la Cámara estaban ganando puntos en un juego en línea por tal comportamiento, como hablar sobre el mismo tema más de una vez (2 puntos), llevar algo extraño en la cabeza al hablar (5 puntos) o mencionar a Bonnie Ball cuando se dirigían a la presidencia (15 puntos).“Eso es muy divertido”, dijo Anderson. “¿Han visto al tipo con la pata de langosta [en el sombrero]? … Tal vez pudiera pedirlo prestado”.Anderson pasó su hora de almuerzo el 9 de julio comiendo pizza y charlando sobre cosas serias y no tan serias con los miembros de la Presencia Oficial de la Juventud. Anderson escribió la resolución en 1982 que creó la presencia, integrada por 18 jóvenes -dos por provincia- que tienen voz pero no voto en la Cámara de los Diputados.Los jóvenes y jóvenes adultos han sido una presencia visible en Indianápolis, reuniéndose con grupos oficiales y con las redes no oficiales para observar y participar en los trabajos de la Convención General.Durante el almuerzo, los jóvenes preguntaron a Anderson sobre cómo ella manejaba el agitado programa de la convención (ella admitió dormir hasta que su alarma la despertara por la mañana por primera vez desde tiempos de la universidad) y comentó sobre su paciencia con la Cámara.“Tengo tres promesas que me hice a mí misma: ten paciencia, sé educada y profesional”, les dijo. Otro buen consejo: “Aspira, respira, y sonríe. Funciona bastante bien”.Cuando uno de los jóvenes dijo que la convención a veces resultaba confusa, Anderson comentó: “Es difícil cuando usted está rastreando algo dejar de hacerlo y girar a la caída de un sombrero y hacer otra cosa”.Y admitió que los acontecimientos podían darle una sorpresa, también a ella. Cuando esperados intérpretes españoles no estaban disponibles durante la sesión de la mañana, ella dijo: “Estaba realmente esperando una solución”.Marlene Rodríguez Hernández, de la Diócesis de Puerto Rico y Cole Mayer de la diócesis de Dakota del Sur, jóvenes designadas periodistas, entrevistaron a Anderson para un segmento de video en el blog del grupo. Se interesaron por la representación de la juventud en el Comité Conjunto Nominador para la elección del Obispo Presidente, sus pensamientos acerca de la presencia de los jóvenes, su inminente retiro y su parte favorita en la Convención General.Reflexionando luego sobre cómo el programa de los jóvenes se había desarrollado a lo largo de los años, Anderson dijo que estaba impresionada por la vitalidad de los jóvenes, el entusiasmo y el compromiso de saber lo que estaba pasando y la participación en la convención. “Es una inspiración para mí. Ellos son los mejores”.Los jóvenes parecían disfrutar también pasando el tiempo con ella.“Creo que es maravillosa”, dijo Emma Grundhauser, de 16 años, de la Diócesis de Minnesota. “Usted puede decir que tiene una pasión por el ministerio de la juventud”.Jóvenes “Millennials”La noche anterior, los jóvenes adultos de todas partes de la convención, incluyendo a los jóvenes diputados y a los miembros del Festival de Jóvenes Adultos – se reunieron en la sala de reuniones del festival en el Hilton antes de la regular reunión de cada noche y de completas.A la reunión siguió a la formación de un grupo de Facebook para los jóvenes adultos y jóvenes diputados a la Convención General por la Rda. Megan Castellan, de 29 años, diputada de la Diócesis de Arizona, después de que se presentó el borrador de presupuesto. En la reunión del 8 de julio, discutieron por qué eran episcopales y cómo se había sentido autorizados o conectados en la convención.“Es importante mencionar el por qué usted forma parte de la iglesia, especialmente cuando la iglesia parece ambivalente acerca de vuestra presencia”, dijo.La lista de “¿Por qué soy locamente episcopal?” incluía: “Porque yo nací aquí, PERO mis padres lo hicieron bien”, “porque tenía una voz”, “por la Escritura, la tradición y la razón, y la conversación no termina ahí”, “a causa de la comunitaria comunión del cáliz”.Castellan dijo que esperaba que el grupo formara una comunidad en línea a través de “listserv” Twitter o grupo en Facebook para mantenerse en contacto después de la convención. “Los jóvenes episcopales no se conocen entre sí. Vas a una iglesia y eres la única persona de menos de 50 años, y puede ser una experiencia de increíble aislamiento”.Castellan dijo que había pertenecido a una red similar de la generación X en la iglesia. “Es realmente una vibrante listserv”.Pero, dijo: “Hay una enorme diferencia entre la generación X y la generación del “millennials”, e incluso entre ella y los más jóvenes de los millennials con los que trabaja con un ministro del campus.“Ellos siempre han crecido en un mundo post-cristiano”, dijo. “Su percepción acerca de por qué van a ir a la iglesia es en general muy diferente a cuando les pregunto a los feligreses mayores”.El Festival de Jóvenes adultosPatrocinado por los Jóvenes adultos de la Iglesia Episcopal y los Ministerios del Campus, el festival ofrece una oportunidad para ser mentores de los jóvenes de 18 a lo 30 años de edad para que asistan a la convención.“Consiste solamente en darles poder para formar parte de esto y ayudarles a abogar por su presencia y defender aquello que les apasiona”, dijo Jason Sierra, oficial de la iglesia para el liderazgo de los jóvenes adultos y las vocaciones. El festival ofrece talleres sobre la forma de gobierno episcopal y de la convención, ayuda a los participantes a seguir la legislación y proporciona oportunidades para el compañerismo y la adoración.“Es una presencia no oficial en la Convención General”, dijo.La convención de este año cuenta con 22 jóvenes adultos diputados y 95 participantes en el festival, incluyendo grandes grupos de las diócesis de Arkansas, Newark, Atlanta y Los Ángeles, dijo Sierra. En una nueva iniciativa, hay 23 jóvenes adultos de pasantías en organizaciones en la convención como: Integridad, la Comunidad Episcopal de Paz, la Consulta de Chicago, el Campamento Episcopal y Centros de Conferencias, Amigos Americanos de la Diócesis Episcopal de Jerusalén y la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo además de las Mujeres de la Iglesia Episcopal, dijo.El festival ofrece a los jóvenes adultos una manera de participar en la convención, por ejemplo, algunos han dado testimonio en las audiencias. Y que puedan participar tanto más o tan poco en los eventos del festival como gusten.“Ellos disfrutan de la flexibilidad, pero necesitan este punto de partida”, dijo Sierra.Creando conexionesLos jóvenes y los jóvenes adultos dieron una total aprobación a las experiencias de la convención.En la reunión de jóvenes “millennials”, Steven Duvoisin de la Diócesis de Nebraska dijo que disfrutó al oír las muchas historias compartidas por la gente “acerca de las experiencias positivas de capacitación que están teniendo dentro de la iglesia”.“Creo que como jóvenes adultos es fácil desanimarse y sentirse aislados y centrarse en los aspectos negativos cuando en realidad hay un montón de cosas buenas y un montón de cosas de Dios que suceden”, dijo Duvoisin, que estaba ayudando al personal de la Fundación de Tri-Faith en el stand de la sala de exposiciones.También de Nebraska, Michael Heller, de 28 años, asistió a la convención como voluntario, sirviendo como asistente legislativo en la estructura de los comités. “Quería ver cómo funciona la Iglesia a este nivel”, dijo. “Ha sido interesante trabajar con otro asesor legislativo que es mucho mayor. Ese tipo de trabajo intergeneracional ha sido una gran experiencia. Es necesario que haya más de esto en la Convención General”.Rachel O’Connell, asistiendo a la convención como parte del festival, dedicó tiempo a aprender sobre el Cuerpo Episcopal Servicio de parte de Amity Carrubba, Directora ejecutiva.La convención ha sido “una experiencia maravillosa, a no ser por el ridículo calor”, dijo O’Connell, de 26 años. “De ninguna manera me he sentido segregada o señalada [como una joven adulta]”.Una gerente de servicio al cliente de una compañía de software en Newport Beach, California, dijo que estaba considerando seriamente participar en el cuerpo de servicio. “Creo que mi vida sería más adecuada en el servicio de lo que es en el software”.De vuelta al almuerzo de la presencia de la juventud, Grace Steele, 16, de la Diócesis de Long Island encontró que la convención le dio la oportunidad de repasar su español.“Pensé que sería una muy buena e interesante experiencia conocer jóvenes de todas partes de la iglesia, especialmente de Puerto Rico y de la República Dominicana”.Hernández, de 17 años, dijo que quería ver si hay diferencias entre los episcopales de los Estados y los de su natal Puerto Rico. Se dio cuenta de que mientras que la lengua es diferente, “todos formamos parte de la misma familia”.También quería experimentar el funcionamiento legislativo de la convención, dijo. “Es una conexión entre la normativa y la iglesia”.“Es muy interesante la forma en que tratamos los asuntos como episcopales”, dijo Mayer, 17. “El estar en un grupo con miles de episcopales es bastante divertido y emocionante”.– Sharon Sheridan es un miembro del equipo de Servicio de Prensa Episcopal en la Convención General. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Los adultos jóvenes adultos y los jóvenes dejan una marca en la Convención General Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA General Convention, Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ center_img General Convention 2012, Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Tags Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Events The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Press Release Por Sharon SheridanPosted Jul 11, 2012 Rector Washington, DC last_img read more

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Episcopal churches go for Pokémon Go

first_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Parishioners at Christ Church, Coronado, in the Diocese of San Diego play Pokemon at the church’s front gate. Photo: Christ Church[Episcopal News Service] Pokémon Go is a game, but Christie Tugend is ready to nominate it for a Nobel Peace Prize.“In the middle of these contentious times, people are coming out of their houses,” said Tugend, parish administrator for Christ Church, Coronado, in the Diocese of San Diego. “They’re walking their neighborhoods and public places, gathering together at all times of the day, and interacting with one another with kind and friendly words and smiles on their faces. Barriers seem to disappear. Okay, so they’re walking around with their noses in their cell phones but still…”Tugend is among the millions of people playing Pokémon Go, an augmented reality game where folks use their phones to find and capture animated creatures. The game, released in early July, has experienced record-breaking growth, with an estimated 30 million downloads in just a few weeks. Tugend and others are not only playing the game themselves but also taking advantage of its wild popularity by extending Christian hospitality.Gamers are showing up at churches – in their yards and inside – to play the game; many church buildings are “Pokestops” and “Gyms,” places where gamers can collect creatures. Some churches are offering free water and places to sit, play, and talk. Others are hosting events or creating space for recharging stations.“When is the last time we have had a literal flood of people onto our parish grounds?” asked the Rev. Mark A. Spaulding, rector of Holy Cross Episcopal Church, Castro Valley, in the Diocese of California. “How shall we respond? ‘Keep them out. Don’t step on the daisies?’ Or, ‘Welcome, we are glad you are here! Here is a chair to make it more comfortable for you.’ The game’s draw has provided a golden opportunity to tell our story, the story of how God loves us and draws us toward peace, justice, and love for all of creation.”After the first day of the game’s launch, Spaulding asked a parishioner to make a sign to post outdoors. Using the game vernacular, the sign welcomes trainers and Ingress teams. A photo of the sign found its way on Reddit, a social networking site, which sparked hundreds of comments about Christianity and the faithful witness of churches like Holy Cross.Said Spaulding, “If this silly little game is the tool that invites the profound and deeper work of making spiritual connections, then yeah, we are all in!”St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Dallas invites gamers to hang out and recharge their phones. Photo: St. Stephen’s Episcopal ChurchAt St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, Sherman, Texas, a pastoral-size congregation in the Diocese of Dallas, the Rev. J. Wesley Evans invited a local Pokémon Go group to come inside and recharge their phones.“Our next step is to make ourselves more hospitable for players by placing a cell phone charging station in our parish hall, which also happens to be in range of our two Pokestops. We’ll also start providing water because Texas gets really hot!” said Evans.This type of “hospitality is an opportunity for the church, particularly in an era when so few people consciously come to us anymore. People are getting outside, meeting strangers, and contributing to the growth of downtown. Our role in this, I think, is to give people a positive experience of church.”Some Christians have derided the game, calling it either “of the devil,” said Evans, or dismissing it as a waste of time.“With Pokémon Go, the opportunity is more of a what not to do rather than anything specific,” he said. “People are coming to the building, and we can either do what should be the norm, show hospitality like Jesus, or we can build a wall because we don’t want ‘those kind of people.’”To help churches respond to the Pokémon Go phenomenon, Forward Movement produced some free resources available for download. A poster welcomes gamers — and, if they’re still searching for something, invites them to learn more about the church, to come to worship, to talk, and to explore. A free bulletin insert is designed for parishioners who may or may not know a lot about the game. It explains Pokémon Go and offers some suggestions for engagement.“As Episcopalians, we love our slogan, ‘The Episcopal Church welcomes you!’ but how often do we get to trot out our warm welcome?” asked the Rev. Scott Gunn, executive director of Forward Movement, a ministry of the Episcopal Church and publisher of Forward Day by Day and other discipleship resources. “Thanks to the Pokémon Go game that is sweeping the country, lots of people are showing up at our churches – sometimes to play on our lawns and sometimes to go inside to catch Pokémon. What can we, as a church, do to welcome these people who may not have ever been to a church before?”Gunn encouraged people to enjoy the opportunity — and to be creative.“If evangelism isn’t fun, we’re not doing it right,” he said. “So have fun offering Christ’s welcome to all who come.”St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Ladue (a suburb of St. Louis) is a Pokémon Go gym. The church has set up Pokémon Go Gym Parking signs on the street to let visitors know they’re welcome. Photo: St. Peter’s Episcopal ChurchPokémon Go isn’t “some magic solution to all of the church’s issues around demographics and attendance,” said the Rev. Ian Lasch, associate rector of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in St. Louis, Missouri. “But I’m fond of saying that after decades of wondering how to get young people to come to church, Pokémon Go is quite literally bringing them to our doorstep,” he said.“At the very least, we have the opportunity to show how welcoming and loving we can be to our neighbors with no strings attached. Even if that’s the most that we can make of this phenomenon, I call that a win.”READ MORE ABOUT ITProvided by Forward MovementWhat is Pokémon Go?The video game of Pokémon isn’t new. It started in the late 1990s in Japan. The goal is to collect virtual creatures through battles, adventures and trainings. In addition to the Pokémon video game, there are trading cards and a slew of tchotchkes. What’s new is the release of Pokémon Go. Run on an Android or iOS system, the game uses a phone’s GPS and clock to detect your location and then make Pokémons “appear” on the screen. You then capture the Pokémons and continue on the quest to “Catch ‘em all.”It’s anyone’s guess why Pokémon Go has become wildly popular in such a short time — an estimated 30 million downloads in the first weeks! But the impact is that people of all ages are exploring new places as part of the game. And our churches are frequent hangouts for virtual Pokémons and real-life players.Why should the church care?Sure, this is a video game, not the heady and vital concerns of our fragile state. But thisgame offers us an opportunity to witness to the type of community and hospitality that Jesus calls us to in the gospels. And our grand Episcopal Church welcome must be extended over and over again—not only to those dressed in Sunday best and perched on pews but also to those who are wandering by on a Tuesday morning, perhaps to find something they didn’t know they were looking for.This app is a game changer for all organizations, not only those that are faith-based, said Sarah Hartwig, communications director for Christ Church Cathedral in Cincinnati, Ohio. “The initial adoption rate of this virtual scavenger hunt has never been seen before in the tech world, and that translates very quickly to encouraging folks who wouldn’t normally converse with one another to engage, at least initially, about Pokemon Go. Churches have a real opportunity to leverage this willingness for people to connect about the app to take that discussion further and to get to know their neighbors better.” Photo: Christ Church CathedralHow can my church engage?Find out if your church is a Pokestop. Download the free game to figure that out — or, if you have people hanging around with their phones, then it’s a good guess that your location is part of the game.Welcome folks to your church. If you’re able, have greeters outside to engage visitors. Hang a poster (Forward Movement has one that you can download) to welcome gamers. Put out some welcome brochures along with disposable glasses and a cooler with ice water. Open the doors to the church and invite folks to come and explore—and maybe provide a cool place to rest and recharge their phones.Encourage folks to share their Pokémon Go experiences on your congregation and personal social media feeds. Set up a personal hashtag or use #pokevangelism for it to flow into the larger Episcopal Church Pokémon feed. Share your church’s experiences at #parishpokemon.Engage Pokémon Go users in your congregation. Brainstorm] together about how to encourage and support visitors. Maybe the congregation could host a Pokémon gathering or offer a raffle of Pokémon accessories (and get visitor information at the same time!). Work within your local community to figure out the best offerings.Be joyful, not fearful. Be willing and ready to see Christ in all people—strangers, gamers, neighbors, and friends.— Richelle Thompson is deputy director and managing editor for Forward Movement. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal churches go for Pokémon Go Congregations welcome gamers and see evangelism opportunities Comments (11) Featured Events Michelle Heitman says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Tags July 27, 2016 at 8:07 am Is there really something so horrible about innocent FUN? I have friends who have been clocking 25-50K walking, who haven’t been anything but a couch potato for years. I have friends who are out, having fun with their children. I have seen, and been with, groups of strangers who connect, who laugh, who smile, who treat each other with kindness, just because of this game. Waste their time? I rather think not. Social Media July 22, 2016 at 7:00 pm Last week, the Canon to the Ordinary for the Diocese of Arizona wrote a well-received article about the advantages of engaging with players in an article entitled “Pokémon Go: Look for Pikachu and Find Jesus.” Read it here: http://www.azdiocese.org/dfc/newsdetail_2/3180108 Abby Murphy says: Dr. Erna Lund says: Vicki Gray says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC July 27, 2016 at 2:47 pm I’m an Episcopalian, and understand the opportunities for invitation and hospitality, and affirm that., especially on church grounds.What about within a sanctuary? My current thinking is that that’s where I would draw the line, but have I become an old fogey and didn’t get the memo? What do people think? Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Comments are closed. Abby Murphy says: August 5, 2016 at 5:33 pm My church is also a pokegym. I knew that from the beginning because one of my teens plays. I haven’t had time to make signs to welcome players yet, and I don’t have the personnel to leave part of the building open. But I have been greeting the youngsters whenever I can. And here’s an interesting result: We had a blood drive last Wed that had free rides all day at an amusement park as an incentive gift for anyone who gave blood. On Tuesday I saw some young teen players so I asked if they liked going to Adventureland. They said sure, so I told them about the incentive. Can’t say if it was connected, but we had the same incentive last year, and this year we nearly doubled the number of units that were donated. Several older teens came to give, which hasn’t happened before, and several adults were also inquiring about the incentive gift because their kids knew about it. So I’m a believer (in both senses) and I’m with the folks who want to go talk with the tax collectors and prostitutes to see if they can hear all or part of the Good News. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET July 22, 2016 at 5:59 pm This is totally ridiculous — and that our faith efforts have been dumb-downed to the commercial establishment–yes, a sign of the times in so many ways that even our faith institutions are not strong enough to withstand these — obviously we are in desperate times for outreach to peoples… no matter what the mode… Dave Eff says: Rector Belleville, IL July 27, 2016 at 8:04 am Dr. Lund, where did Jesus go to find his followers? Did he exclusively go to the houses of the “respectable and the learned”? Or did he go everywhere and anywhere that the souls who would receive his message might be? People are coming to the churches, because that’s where the stops are. This gives us an opportunity to show that we really DO welcome them. July 22, 2016 at 4:24 pm Our church is a Pokegym. So we put a sign on the church door with a large Pokeball on it and the words:POKEMON TRAINERSWelcome.This church/Pokegym is open each day till 6:30 pmAfter battling, why not stop in for a few minutes to restMaybe you might even say a Poke-prayer.Have fun.Stay safe.Respect Everyone You Meet.Play Nice.It’s been fun to greet players and chat with them. This is a real opportunity for hospitality. Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC By Richelle ThompsonPosted Jul 22, 2016 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Michelle Heitman says: July 23, 2016 at 1:21 pm Thanks for the article. Wonderful opportunity to met and invite people in. No different than music. Once they are there they can learn and participate in all manner of words. Then thru works they may believe. It’s all a process of faith. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ July 25, 2016 at 11:00 am It seems to me Christ went to where people WERE, rather than sit around in a nice building, convinced his superiority would make them come to him. I’m not a fan of the nose-buried-in-a-screen trend either, and I don’t know if it’s the right fit for my parish, but is there really a benefit to insisting that everyone first follow our social preferences before we reach out to them where they are? Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ August 5, 2016 at 5:08 pm Probably not, but we could smell the incense, and that would be a very fine thing. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Smithfield, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest John Fitzgerald says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VA Press Release Service Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group July 22, 2016 at 6:10 pm How sad. Are we so desperate to fill our buildings that we encourage people to waste their time walking around like so many mindless zombies? Nicole Krug, Canon for Media & Communications says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Chris carey says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Chuck Kramer says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET last_img read more

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Iraqi refugee becomes Anglican priest in Canada

first_imgIraqi refugee becomes Anglican priest in Canada Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska Tags An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Refugees Migration & Resettlement Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT [Anglican Communion News Service] The Rev, Ayoob Shawkat Adwar, a priest formerly in the Chaldean Catholic Church, was received as an Anglican priest at a ceremony in Surrey, British Columbia, Canada, last month.The event was a “small but significant piece of history,” says Archdeacon Stephen Rowe, rector of the Anglican Parish of the Church of the Epiphany in Surrey, since Adwar is thought to be the first Chaldean priest in history to have become a member of the Anglican clergy.Full article. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Knoxville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit an Event Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC center_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Press Release Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Albany, NY Rector Martinsville, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Posted Apr 25, 2017 Cathedral Dean Boise, IDlast_img read more

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‘Mainstream, not extreme’ was sentiment for interfaith advocacy day at…

first_img Human Sexuality Rector Belleville, IL ‘Mainstream, not extreme’ was sentiment for interfaith advocacy day at Texas capitol Advocacy Peace & Justice, Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Ecumenical & Interreligious, Tags Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ronald Davin says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Posted Aug 3, 2017 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Events Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Comments (3) Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Christine Wendt says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA August 4, 2017 at 3:56 am Mr. Davin, I believe your question would be reported and removed on most social media discussion sites for “trolling.” If you think about it for one minute you know very well that the issue is one of allowing people to choose the bathroom that aligns with the gender they know themselves to be. No one is trying to do away with gendered bathrooms. I can feel your anger pulsating in your (insincere) question and I hope you think about why the existence of transgendered people makes you so angry. Terry Francis says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Comments are closed. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Press Release Service Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC August 3, 2017 at 7:37 pm So why does my Church still sport 2 bathrooms, 1 for each gender. Do they not believe in lading by example ? Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY August 4, 2017 at 11:48 am Spoken like a true progressive Christine – condescending, self-rightous and judgemental. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Tampa, FL The Rev. Lisa Hunt, rector of St. Stephen’s, Houston and the Rev. Jon Page, pastor of First Congregational Church, Houston met with Rep. Todd Hunter, chair of the Calendar Committee of the Texas Legislature during an Interfaith Advocacy Day to oppose the “bathroom” bill.[Episcopal Diocese of Texas] A broad coalition of mainstream Texas religious leaders spoke out Aug.1 against Senate Bill 3 and other so-called “bathrooms bills” that would discriminate against transgender youths and adults.The speakers, who represent millions of mainstream faith community members, included leaders from the Christian, Jewish and Muslim traditions, and a non-denominational Christian parent of a transgender child.More than 350 people gathered on the Capitol steps in Austin and under the shade of oaks lining the walkway to lend their voices in opposition to the contentious “bathroom” bill (HB46, SB3) in a day of interfaith advocacy sponsored by Texas Impact.“This is what theology looks like,” General Presbyter Sallie Sampsell Watson of Mission Presbytery in San Antonio told the crowd.Mufti Mohamed-Umer Esmail of Austin also spoke at the morning press conference. “The Quran states, God is the one who shapes you in the wombs however He pleases,” Esmail said. “The Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) said, ‘Indeed God does not look at your faces and bodies, rather he looks at your hearts and deeds.’ I call upon the governor of Texas and the legislature: Enough of the transphobia! Y’all means all!” echoing the slogan on signs that many were carrying.Citing “emotional and spiritual damage that discrimination does to transgender people,” Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, president of the House of Deputies, wrote to House Speaker Joe Straus earlier in support of his opposition to any bathroom bill. The Episcopal Church will hold its General Convention in Austin in July 2018.Following the morning press conference, Texas Impact, offered a brief training on the “10 commandments” of speaking with elected officials, then small groups went to meet with individual senators and representatives and their staffs.The Rev. Lisa Hunt, rector of St. Stephen’s, Houston; the Rev. Judith Liro (ret) and the Rev. Janice Krause, priest-in-charge of St. James’, Austin, participated with a number of Episcopal lay people including Molly Sharp of St. David’s, Austin and S. Wayne Mathis of St. Andrew’s, Houston.Participants were reminded to be positive, brief and to say “Thank you.” By all accounts, those who gathered had very positive experiences in meeting with either a staff person or their representatives and senators.Rep. Todd Hunter is chair of the Calendars Committee. An active Episcopalian, Hunter met with Hunt and the Rev. Jon Page, pastor of First Congregational Church of Houston.Hunt told the seven-term congressman that transgender children and their families will have a hard time finding a safe environment for school if the bill were to pass. She also noted promises in the Baptismal Covenant to respect the dignity of every human being.“You are the first Episcopalians who have come to visit me,” Hunter said. He told Sharp, Hunt and Page that personal visits matter and encouraged them to continue the practice. “A common sense vote in the House (the bill has passed in the Senate) would neutralize these kinds of bills in the future,” he added. Hunter shared some of the complicated process of legislation and lamented the decline in civil discourse in politics in recent years. Early in July, a fire consumed Hunter’s Corpus Christi office and is still under investigation. And while Hunter seemed unruffled by the bodyguards who now stand outside his door, he was grateful for the prayers Hunt offered for him, his staff and the Legislature.“In this season of intense partisanship it is tempting for us as Episcopalians to shy away from our role as citizens,” Hunt said, “but meeting with fellow Episcopalian Todd Hunter and learning about the arson of his law office, I am reminded we are citizens together. He, and the other legislators need our support in their critical ministry as a legislators, especially now.”Texas Impact set up the Interfaith Advocacy Day and helped prioritize House members to be visited, because the House has yet to vote on the bill. According to Texas Impact, a minority misrepresent that the faith community supports the bathroom bill and it was important for legislatures to hear from others of faith who did not. “Regulating who uses what bathroom is a solution in search of a problem,” they said, pointing out that proponents could not point to a single incident not already addressed by the Texas Penal Code. Further, they said it is a waste of time when the state has real challenges.Texas Impact is a statewide religious grassroots network whose members include individuals, congregations and governing bodies of the Christian, Jewish and Muslim faiths. Texas Impact exists to advance state public policies that are consistent with universally held social principles of the Abrahamic traditions. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GAlast_img read more

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