Forget buy-to-let! I’d invest in this FTSE 100 property stock today

first_img Stepan Lavrouk | Wednesday, 12th February, 2020 | More on: LAND Enter Your Email Address Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Image source: Getty Images. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Stepan Lavrouk owns no shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Landsec. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997”center_img Forget buy-to-let! I’d invest in this FTSE 100 property stock today Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. When it comes to the property market, almost everyone under the sun seems to have an opinion on it. When it comes to stocks, bonds, commodities, cryptocurrencies, or any other asset class, many non-professionals are often reluctant to get involved, as they perceive the area as difficult to understand. By contrast, most investors claim to have a decent understanding of the property sector. In the UK, the classic adage is that property never goes down in value. While this is not always the case — as house buyers in the UK and Ireland most recently found out to their cost in 2007/08 — this belief has remained remarkably persistent. But that’s understandable as overall, property is an asset class that performs well, assuming it is bought at sensible valuations. This helps to explain the popularity of buy-to-let. 5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Should you buy-to-let?Buy-to-let mortgages are available for prospective landlords and while there are certainly some advantages to this investing strategy, it does come with a number of significant drawbacks. For starters, not everyone can afford to take on a large loan to finance the acquisition of another property. Even if you are in a position where you can finance such a purchase with your own money, you will still face as a landlord. You are responsible for the upkeep of the property, and have legal obligations as the owner. And then there is the question of lack of diversification —  a single property may create the problem of having too many eggs in one basket. What happens if property values in your town go down? For all of these reasons, I believe that real estate investment trusts, or REITs, offer a much better option for investors looking for exposure to the UK property sector. REITs are publicly traded companies that own and operate a portfolio of properties, and that must by law distribute at least 90% of their earnings as dividends to investors. They offer the benefit of diversification at a tiny fraction of the price of a single buy-to-let, and they allow younger investors the chance to enter the property market without having to save up for a mortgage.LandsecShares of commercial property REIT Landsec (LSE:LAND) are currently trading at 972p a share and carry a dividend yield of 4.8%, which is half a point better than the FTSE 100 average of 4.3%. It currently trades at a price-to-book ratio of 0.75, which suggests that it is undervalued relative to the real assets of the business. Landsec owns a number of high-profile commercial and retail properties in London, including the Piccadilly Lights. It also owns many office buildings in the City of London. And I think that if you are planning to invest in the British property sector, your best bet is to go after the most highly sought after locations in Central London. But Landsec’s properties outside of London are also strong. Bluewater in Kent, for instance, is one of the UK’s ‘supermalls’ and not feeling the pain of the retail downturn in the way that some smaller shopping centres are.All in all, it appeals to me so much more than the hassle of being a landlord! I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. See all posts by Stepan Lavrouk Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shareslast_img read more

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Rugby DVD Review – England 35 Australia 18: The 2010 Cook Cup

first_imgBUY IT AT:  amazon.co.ukGo Entertainment         £7.99 LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Relive England’s finest hour since the 2003 World Cup, the day when, in Stuart Barnes’s words, “England restored its rugby pride and Twickenham found its blood”. Croft soared, Lawes marauded, Youngs sniped, Ashton dashed – and Johnno’s men gave the Aussies a rare pasting. This DVD features Sky’s coverage of the match last November, from build-up to post-match interviews.RW RATING 3/5last_img read more

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Episcopal churches go for Pokémon Go

first_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Parishioners at Christ Church, Coronado, in the Diocese of San Diego play Pokemon at the church’s front gate. Photo: Christ Church[Episcopal News Service] Pokémon Go is a game, but Christie Tugend is ready to nominate it for a Nobel Peace Prize.“In the middle of these contentious times, people are coming out of their houses,” said Tugend, parish administrator for Christ Church, Coronado, in the Diocese of San Diego. “They’re walking their neighborhoods and public places, gathering together at all times of the day, and interacting with one another with kind and friendly words and smiles on their faces. Barriers seem to disappear. Okay, so they’re walking around with their noses in their cell phones but still…”Tugend is among the millions of people playing Pokémon Go, an augmented reality game where folks use their phones to find and capture animated creatures. The game, released in early July, has experienced record-breaking growth, with an estimated 30 million downloads in just a few weeks. Tugend and others are not only playing the game themselves but also taking advantage of its wild popularity by extending Christian hospitality.Gamers are showing up at churches – in their yards and inside – to play the game; many church buildings are “Pokestops” and “Gyms,” places where gamers can collect creatures. Some churches are offering free water and places to sit, play, and talk. Others are hosting events or creating space for recharging stations.“When is the last time we have had a literal flood of people onto our parish grounds?” asked the Rev. Mark A. Spaulding, rector of Holy Cross Episcopal Church, Castro Valley, in the Diocese of California. “How shall we respond? ‘Keep them out. Don’t step on the daisies?’ Or, ‘Welcome, we are glad you are here! Here is a chair to make it more comfortable for you.’ The game’s draw has provided a golden opportunity to tell our story, the story of how God loves us and draws us toward peace, justice, and love for all of creation.”After the first day of the game’s launch, Spaulding asked a parishioner to make a sign to post outdoors. Using the game vernacular, the sign welcomes trainers and Ingress teams. A photo of the sign found its way on Reddit, a social networking site, which sparked hundreds of comments about Christianity and the faithful witness of churches like Holy Cross.Said Spaulding, “If this silly little game is the tool that invites the profound and deeper work of making spiritual connections, then yeah, we are all in!”St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Dallas invites gamers to hang out and recharge their phones. Photo: St. Stephen’s Episcopal ChurchAt St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, Sherman, Texas, a pastoral-size congregation in the Diocese of Dallas, the Rev. J. Wesley Evans invited a local Pokémon Go group to come inside and recharge their phones.“Our next step is to make ourselves more hospitable for players by placing a cell phone charging station in our parish hall, which also happens to be in range of our two Pokestops. We’ll also start providing water because Texas gets really hot!” said Evans.This type of “hospitality is an opportunity for the church, particularly in an era when so few people consciously come to us anymore. People are getting outside, meeting strangers, and contributing to the growth of downtown. Our role in this, I think, is to give people a positive experience of church.”Some Christians have derided the game, calling it either “of the devil,” said Evans, or dismissing it as a waste of time.“With Pokémon Go, the opportunity is more of a what not to do rather than anything specific,” he said. “People are coming to the building, and we can either do what should be the norm, show hospitality like Jesus, or we can build a wall because we don’t want ‘those kind of people.’”To help churches respond to the Pokémon Go phenomenon, Forward Movement produced some free resources available for download. A poster welcomes gamers — and, if they’re still searching for something, invites them to learn more about the church, to come to worship, to talk, and to explore. A free bulletin insert is designed for parishioners who may or may not know a lot about the game. It explains Pokémon Go and offers some suggestions for engagement.“As Episcopalians, we love our slogan, ‘The Episcopal Church welcomes you!’ but how often do we get to trot out our warm welcome?” asked the Rev. Scott Gunn, executive director of Forward Movement, a ministry of the Episcopal Church and publisher of Forward Day by Day and other discipleship resources. “Thanks to the Pokémon Go game that is sweeping the country, lots of people are showing up at our churches – sometimes to play on our lawns and sometimes to go inside to catch Pokémon. What can we, as a church, do to welcome these people who may not have ever been to a church before?”Gunn encouraged people to enjoy the opportunity — and to be creative.“If evangelism isn’t fun, we’re not doing it right,” he said. “So have fun offering Christ’s welcome to all who come.”St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Ladue (a suburb of St. Louis) is a Pokémon Go gym. The church has set up Pokémon Go Gym Parking signs on the street to let visitors know they’re welcome. Photo: St. Peter’s Episcopal ChurchPokémon Go isn’t “some magic solution to all of the church’s issues around demographics and attendance,” said the Rev. Ian Lasch, associate rector of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in St. Louis, Missouri. “But I’m fond of saying that after decades of wondering how to get young people to come to church, Pokémon Go is quite literally bringing them to our doorstep,” he said.“At the very least, we have the opportunity to show how welcoming and loving we can be to our neighbors with no strings attached. Even if that’s the most that we can make of this phenomenon, I call that a win.”READ MORE ABOUT ITProvided by Forward MovementWhat is Pokémon Go?The video game of Pokémon isn’t new. It started in the late 1990s in Japan. The goal is to collect virtual creatures through battles, adventures and trainings. In addition to the Pokémon video game, there are trading cards and a slew of tchotchkes. What’s new is the release of Pokémon Go. Run on an Android or iOS system, the game uses a phone’s GPS and clock to detect your location and then make Pokémons “appear” on the screen. You then capture the Pokémons and continue on the quest to “Catch ‘em all.”It’s anyone’s guess why Pokémon Go has become wildly popular in such a short time — an estimated 30 million downloads in the first weeks! But the impact is that people of all ages are exploring new places as part of the game. And our churches are frequent hangouts for virtual Pokémons and real-life players.Why should the church care?Sure, this is a video game, not the heady and vital concerns of our fragile state. But thisgame offers us an opportunity to witness to the type of community and hospitality that Jesus calls us to in the gospels. And our grand Episcopal Church welcome must be extended over and over again—not only to those dressed in Sunday best and perched on pews but also to those who are wandering by on a Tuesday morning, perhaps to find something they didn’t know they were looking for.This app is a game changer for all organizations, not only those that are faith-based, said Sarah Hartwig, communications director for Christ Church Cathedral in Cincinnati, Ohio. “The initial adoption rate of this virtual scavenger hunt has never been seen before in the tech world, and that translates very quickly to encouraging folks who wouldn’t normally converse with one another to engage, at least initially, about Pokemon Go. Churches have a real opportunity to leverage this willingness for people to connect about the app to take that discussion further and to get to know their neighbors better.” Photo: Christ Church CathedralHow can my church engage?Find out if your church is a Pokestop. Download the free game to figure that out — or, if you have people hanging around with their phones, then it’s a good guess that your location is part of the game.Welcome folks to your church. If you’re able, have greeters outside to engage visitors. Hang a poster (Forward Movement has one that you can download) to welcome gamers. Put out some welcome brochures along with disposable glasses and a cooler with ice water. Open the doors to the church and invite folks to come and explore—and maybe provide a cool place to rest and recharge their phones.Encourage folks to share their Pokémon Go experiences on your congregation and personal social media feeds. Set up a personal hashtag or use #pokevangelism for it to flow into the larger Episcopal Church Pokémon feed. Share your church’s experiences at #parishpokemon.Engage Pokémon Go users in your congregation. Brainstorm] together about how to encourage and support visitors. Maybe the congregation could host a Pokémon gathering or offer a raffle of Pokémon accessories (and get visitor information at the same time!). Work within your local community to figure out the best offerings.Be joyful, not fearful. Be willing and ready to see Christ in all people—strangers, gamers, neighbors, and friends.— Richelle Thompson is deputy director and managing editor for Forward Movement. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal churches go for Pokémon Go Congregations welcome gamers and see evangelism opportunities Comments (11) Featured Events Michelle Heitman says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Tags July 27, 2016 at 8:07 am Is there really something so horrible about innocent FUN? I have friends who have been clocking 25-50K walking, who haven’t been anything but a couch potato for years. I have friends who are out, having fun with their children. I have seen, and been with, groups of strangers who connect, who laugh, who smile, who treat each other with kindness, just because of this game. Waste their time? I rather think not. Social Media July 22, 2016 at 7:00 pm Last week, the Canon to the Ordinary for the Diocese of Arizona wrote a well-received article about the advantages of engaging with players in an article entitled “Pokémon Go: Look for Pikachu and Find Jesus.” Read it here: http://www.azdiocese.org/dfc/newsdetail_2/3180108 Abby Murphy says: Dr. Erna Lund says: Vicki Gray says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC July 27, 2016 at 2:47 pm I’m an Episcopalian, and understand the opportunities for invitation and hospitality, and affirm that., especially on church grounds.What about within a sanctuary? My current thinking is that that’s where I would draw the line, but have I become an old fogey and didn’t get the memo? What do people think? Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Comments are closed. Abby Murphy says: August 5, 2016 at 5:33 pm My church is also a pokegym. I knew that from the beginning because one of my teens plays. I haven’t had time to make signs to welcome players yet, and I don’t have the personnel to leave part of the building open. But I have been greeting the youngsters whenever I can. And here’s an interesting result: We had a blood drive last Wed that had free rides all day at an amusement park as an incentive gift for anyone who gave blood. On Tuesday I saw some young teen players so I asked if they liked going to Adventureland. They said sure, so I told them about the incentive. Can’t say if it was connected, but we had the same incentive last year, and this year we nearly doubled the number of units that were donated. Several older teens came to give, which hasn’t happened before, and several adults were also inquiring about the incentive gift because their kids knew about it. So I’m a believer (in both senses) and I’m with the folks who want to go talk with the tax collectors and prostitutes to see if they can hear all or part of the Good News. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET July 22, 2016 at 5:59 pm This is totally ridiculous — and that our faith efforts have been dumb-downed to the commercial establishment–yes, a sign of the times in so many ways that even our faith institutions are not strong enough to withstand these — obviously we are in desperate times for outreach to peoples… no matter what the mode… Dave Eff says: Rector Belleville, IL July 27, 2016 at 8:04 am Dr. Lund, where did Jesus go to find his followers? Did he exclusively go to the houses of the “respectable and the learned”? Or did he go everywhere and anywhere that the souls who would receive his message might be? People are coming to the churches, because that’s where the stops are. This gives us an opportunity to show that we really DO welcome them. July 22, 2016 at 4:24 pm Our church is a Pokegym. So we put a sign on the church door with a large Pokeball on it and the words:POKEMON TRAINERSWelcome.This church/Pokegym is open each day till 6:30 pmAfter battling, why not stop in for a few minutes to restMaybe you might even say a Poke-prayer.Have fun.Stay safe.Respect Everyone You Meet.Play Nice.It’s been fun to greet players and chat with them. This is a real opportunity for hospitality. Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC By Richelle ThompsonPosted Jul 22, 2016 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Michelle Heitman says: July 23, 2016 at 1:21 pm Thanks for the article. Wonderful opportunity to met and invite people in. No different than music. Once they are there they can learn and participate in all manner of words. Then thru works they may believe. It’s all a process of faith. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ July 25, 2016 at 11:00 am It seems to me Christ went to where people WERE, rather than sit around in a nice building, convinced his superiority would make them come to him. I’m not a fan of the nose-buried-in-a-screen trend either, and I don’t know if it’s the right fit for my parish, but is there really a benefit to insisting that everyone first follow our social preferences before we reach out to them where they are? Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ August 5, 2016 at 5:08 pm Probably not, but we could smell the incense, and that would be a very fine thing. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Smithfield, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest John Fitzgerald says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VA Press Release Service Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group July 22, 2016 at 6:10 pm How sad. Are we so desperate to fill our buildings that we encourage people to waste their time walking around like so many mindless zombies? Nicole Krug, Canon for Media & Communications says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Chris carey says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Chuck Kramer says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET last_img read more

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Maori Anglicans tell of turning grief to joy during ‘planetary…

first_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ By Egan MillardPosted Dec 1, 2020 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Press Release Service Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Featured Events Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Maori Anglicans tell of turning grief to joy during ‘planetary crisis’ webinar Four-part Advent webinar series runs through Dec. 21 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Job Listing Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel A group of Maori people sings a song about the spread of the gospel in New Zealand in a video prepared by the the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia for the “Prophetic Indigenous Voices on the Planetary Crisis” webinar on Nov. 30. Courtesy image[Episcopal News Service] Themes of Indigenous values, environmental stewardship and Christian theology coalesced into one clear message during the “Prophetic Indigenous Voices on the Planetary Crisis” webinar on Nov. 30: All of creation is connected, and everyone must help care for it.The webinar, the first in a four-part Advent series organized by the Anglican Indigenous Network, the Anglican Communion Environmental Network and the Anglican Alliance, featured contributions from Indigenous Anglicans in New Zealand and Polynesia. The series is designed to elevate the voices of Indigenous Anglicans around the world, highlighting their unique perspectives on the natural world and the disproportionate impact that the climate crisis is wreaking on their livelihoods and cultures.Anglicans should look to Indigenous peoples for a deep, ancient understanding of the natural world and learn from their practices to forge holistic solutions to environmental problems, said National Indigenous Anglican Bishop Mark MacDonald of the Anglican Church of Canada.“It is desperately important to the future of our planet” that Indigenous rights and cultures be respected, MacDonald told attendees.“This is a critical piece in the communion’s beginning to understand the full dimensions of the environmental crisis that is upon us.”The centerpiece of the webinar was a video presentation from the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia. Intercut with the natural sights and sounds of the South Pacific islands, the video showed how the reverence that the Maori (the Indigenous people of New Zealand, which they call Aotearoa) have for nature connects with the Anglican value of caring for creation.Archbishop Emeritus Winston Halapua shared a reflection on the strength shown by Mary even in the midst of her lament at Jesus’ crucifixion, as depicted in John’s Gospel. Tears of grief – loimata in Samoan – can actually be a transformative, clarifying gift, Halapua said, and can become tears of joy in the sight of the resurrection.“Loimata is God’s gift to Aotearoa, to the Anglican Communion, and to the world,” he said. “Our guardianship of such a gift … no one can take it away from us. It is given to be shared with God, the whole creation, including humanity.”Attendees were introduced to Maori concepts of nature and spirituality, including kaitiakitanga, which refers to the interdependence of humans and the rest of creation. Kaitiakitanga means that all elements of the natural world are sacred and must be protected.The term “mana” refers to the spiritual power inherent in natural features – even inanimate ones, like lakes or shorelines – that can be received by humans. It is similar to the word “Maori,” which itself refers to the life force that exists in all creation.“While the Indigenous concept of kaitiakitanga certainly predates the arrival of missionaries and Western Christianity, there are significant resonances between kaitiakitanga and the Christian concept of relationality within creation,” one speaker said.“As Christians, we affirm that human existence is intrinsically, inescapably inseparable from God. Life without God is simply impossible. God is the source of our existence, our beginning and our ending. The same way that our existence is profoundly dependent upon God, so too we have been dependent upon the Earth.”Attendees were encouraged to adopt “an attitude of restraint” with regard to how their lifestyles can impact the natural world, similar to the practice of honoring the Sabbath.Such an attitude, the speakers said, might “enable healing and restoration for all God’s creation, breaking the pattern of unfettered progress and unquestioning consumption of its resources. It is a reminder of the imperatives of justice, so that all creation might flourish and have abundant life.”Fe’íloakitau Kaho Tevi, a member of the Anglican Diocese of Polynesia who is from Fiji and Tonga, shared “a story of a journey of hope” in the face of ecological crisis. Knowing that these South Pacific islands are increasingly vulnerable to flooding and wind damage from tropical storms, in 2017, the young people of the diocese took a training course from the University of the South Pacific on how to assess vulnerabilities in Tonga.They used satellite imagery to map out the places in their communities that were most at risk from flooding and storm damage, and they made a list of the elderly people, widows, single mothers and others who might need extra help in the event of a cyclone. They also raised $300 to buy and distribute basic emergency supply kits.That meant that Tongans were more prepared in 2018 when Tropical Cyclone Gita swept through, the most intense tropical cyclone to impact Tonga in modern recorded history. Again, the young people of the diocese stepped up to help.“The young people did the assessment of the damages in the areas that they covered. They went about quickly cleaning up the communities, cleaning up the houses, pulling down the broken branches, and also in the process, they crafted a report about the damages in their communities,” Tevi said.With this damage assessment, they were able to apply to international partners for aid, which arrived in the form of two shipping containers’ worth of building materials, tools and emergency supplies.“Our story is about building resilience in our communities,” Tevi said. “Our responsibility and our culture will continue to remind us that we are the guardians of God’s loimata, God’s tears. As reflected by Archbishop Emeritus Winston, Mary’s tears turned from tears of sorrow to tears of joy, a sense of resilience that in her decision to step up through her vulnerability, God reached out to her as a child.”The next webinar will focus on Indigenous Anglicans in Africa, featuring Bishop Ellinah Wamukoya of Swaziland. It will be held on Zoom at 1 p.m. GMT in English and Portuguese. The series continues with South America on Dec. 14 and the Arctic on Dec. 21.– Egan Millard is an assistant editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Environment & Climate Change, Rector Collierville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Anglican Communion, Rector Belleville, IL Indigenous Ministries Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AKlast_img read more

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South End Residence / Peter Braithwaite Studio

first_img South End Residence / Peter Braithwaite Studio “COPY” 2016 CopyHouses, Refurbishment•Halifax, Canada ArchDaily ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/786709/south-end-residence-peter-braithwaite-studio Clipboard “COPY” ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/786709/south-end-residence-peter-braithwaite-studio Clipboard Houses Architects: Peter Braithwaite Studio Area Area of this architecture project Save this picture!© Julian Parkinson+ 25 Share Structural: South End Residence / Peter Braithwaite StudioSave this projectSaveSouth End Residence / Peter Braithwaite Studio CopyAbout this officePeter Braithwaite StudioOfficeFollowProductWood#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesRefurbishmentHalifaxCanadaPublished on May 06, 2016Cite: “South End Residence / Peter Braithwaite Studio” 06 May 2016. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogPartitionsSkyfoldChoosing the Skyfold Wall for Your SpaceGlass3MSun Control Film – Prestige ExteriorShowerhansgroheShowers – Croma SelectWall / Ceiling LightsSpectrum LightingLED Downlight – Infinium 3″ Round FlangelessVentilated / Double Skin FacadeCosentinoDekton Cladding in LD Sevilla hotelSealantsSikaJoint SealingBeams / PillarsLunawoodThermowood Frames and BearersPorcelain StonewareApariciPorcelain Tiles – MarblesCeramicsTerrealTerracotta Facade in Manchester HospitalWindowspanoramah!®ah! CornerHome AppliancesGIRAGira Keyless in – Door communicationLightsLinea Light GroupIntegrated Lighting – Fylo+More products »Read commentsSave想阅读文章的中文版本吗?南端住宅 / Peter Braithwaite Studio是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Photographs Andrea Doncaster Engineering Manufacturers: Nova Floor Care Projects Photographs:  Julian Parkinson Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Staging And Styling:Attica FunishingsArtwork:Christopher JoyceConstruction And Millwork:Peter Braithwaite StudioDiagrams:Devin HarperRenderings:Ryan NelsonArchitect In Charge:Peter Braithwaite StudioDesign Team:Peter Braithwaite, Devin HarperConstruction:Peter Braithwaite StudioMillwork:Peter Braithwaite StudioCity:HalifaxCountry:CanadaMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Julian ParkinsonRecommended ProductsDoorsLibartVertical Retracting Doors – Panora ViewWoodTechnowoodPergola SystemsDoorsRabel Aluminium SystemsMinimal Sliding Door – Rabel 62 Slim Super ThermalDoorsAir-LuxPivoting DoorText description provided by the architects. This project is located in the historic South End of Halifax, Nova Scotia, near the cities largest municipal park. The project was a complete redesign and transformation of a dated house in a traditional neighborhood into a contemporary residence. The design intent was to pay homage to the historical neighborhood by maintaining the original form of the structure while modernizing the aesthetic and detailing. We endeavored to create a home that suited the client’s contemporary taste and lifestyle while remaining perceptive to the surroundings. Save this picture!BeforeSave this picture!DiagramSave this picture!© Julian ParkinsonThis was accomplished through the removal of a number of interior walls and vaulting the ceiling in the great room to create a large open central gathering space. The window openings were also increased in size; these larger windows flood the new spaces with ample natural light and provide views of the foliage in the back garden.Save this picture!Floor PlanThe inoperable garage was converted into a covered entrance with ample storage for bikes and recreational equipment. This space was topped with a semi private balcony off of one of the three bedrooms that provides an area to relax in the sun during the summer months and offers views over the quiet neighborhood street.Save this picture!© Julian ParkinsonThe result is a carefully considered interior space that supports family interaction, reflects the clean lines of modern aesthetic and displays thoughtful detailing. The exterior, on the other hand, continues to participate in the traditional language of the neighbourhood through its form and materials, but distinctively hints at what awaits inside.Save this picture!© Julian ParkinsonAs a design build company we are responsible for all aspects of design and physical construction. We find that this way of working allows us to address the inevitable difficulties that arise throughout a project at both the design and construction level. In this particular project everything from the initial demolition to the custom millwork fabrication and installation was included in our scope and we were able to work through solutions in a way that reflected the overall design intent.Save this picture!© Julian ParkinsonProject gallerySee allShow lessPershing Square Renew Unveils Finalist Designs by wHY, James Corner Field Operations…Architecture NewsCoffice / GASPARBONTASelected Projects Share Canada Area:  310 ft² Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: last_img read more

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US charities receive Enron cash

 12 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 28 January 2002 | News Charities are one of the few beneficiaries of the collapse of Texas-based energy company Enron.Charities are one of the few beneficiaries of the collapse of Texas-based energy company Enron. Some politicians are keen to return political contributions from the company by giving them to charity.Read Charities benefit from Enron cash by Jeff Zeleny at the Chicago Tribune. Advertisement US charities receive Enron cash About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. read more

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Draft Major Donor Code of Practice published

first_img Tagged with: Major gift AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 17 July 2005 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. The Institute of Fundraising has published the draft Code of Fundraising Practice for Major Donor Fundraising.This is the Institute’s first Major Donor Fundraising Code and it has been developed by a Working Party over the past year. Fundraisers can now add their views on the draft until 30 September 2005. The Working Party was chaired by Midé Akerewusi, Head of High Value Appeals at Scope, who has over nine years’ experience raising major gifts. Of the new ./guidance, he said “This Code deals with one of the most exciting and financially rewarding fundraising techniques in the voluntary sector. It will be a useful resource to all who want to build their awareness of issues which directly impact on successful major donor fundraising”. Advertisementcenter_img The Code defines major donor fundraising, addressing legal issues, prospect research, data protection, legacies and tax issues in major donor fundraising. It also covers the relationship between donor and fundraiser, the opportunities to expand those relationships, alongside major donor programmes, membership or friend schemes.The Major Donor Fundraising Code adds to the Institute’s existing suite of over 20 Codes of Fundraising Practice, published online or available in printed copy. The draft Code is published on the Institute’s website.  30 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Draft Major Donor Code of Practice publishedlast_img read more

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Palestinian filmmaker detained at LAX

first_imgEmad BurnatPalestinian director Emad Burnat and his family were detained and threatened with deportation by U.S. immigration officials when they arrived at Los Angeles International Airport on Feb. 19 to attend the Academy Awards ceremony later that week. His film, “5 Broken Cameras,” received an Oscar nomination for Best Documentary Feature, marking the first such nomination for a Palestinian’s film.Immigration officials demanded Burnat produce permits and identification, refusing to believe that a Palestinian could be invited to such a distinguished event, or his film nominated for an Oscar, even after Burnat showed them his invitation.Burnat contacted filmmaker Michael Moore, who called officials at the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences, which produces the Oscars, and demanded Burnat’s release. After being held and questioned for 90 minutes, Burnat and his family were told that they were free to go. There were no apologies.Explaining his ordeal to the Huffington Post the next day, Burnet said, “Although this was an unpleasant experience, this is a daily occurrence for Palestinians, every single day, throughout the West Bank. There are more than 500 Israeli checkpoints, roadblocks and other barriers to movement across our land, and not a single one of us has been spared the experience that my family and I experienced yesterday. Ours was a very minor example of what my people face every day.”Burnat is a farmer who lives in the West Bank village of Bil’in. In 2005, he obtained a video camera to record the birth and early life of his son, Gibreel. Then, Israelis began to build a “security wall,” with military backing — and U.S. approval — right in the middle of the village’s land. Half of Bil’in’s land would be confiscated.The people of Bil’in launched a strong struggle against the wall, facing Israeli bulldozers, soldiers and settlers, and meeting with intense violence, imprisonment and even death.Burnat began to record on film their inspiring struggle. As he explained in the documentary, “These are my five cameras. Each one is an episode of my life. When something happens in the village, my instinct is to film it.”On the first day, Burnat’s original camera was destroyed by an Israeli gas bomb while he was filming the attack on the villagers. For seven years, he recorded the villagers’ struggle, even being beaten and jailed by the Israeli military as his cameras were smashed.As PBS NewsHour describes it, “Along the way, one camera after another — five in all — were destroyed. Each became a kind of chapter in the story.” (Feb. 22)Burnat enlisted Israeli filmmaker and activist Guy Davidi to be the film’s co-director. Le Trio Joubran, a band made up of three Palestinian brothers, performed the music for the movie.Davidi and Burnat have had to contend with Zionist propaganda, including in the motion picture industry. When Academy officials stated that this film came from Israel and refused to recognize the nation of Palestine, the directors firmly refuted that.“For me, it was important to create this film and to work on [it] for seven years, to follow the characters and follow my son, to create this piece of art, to show the world and show the people outside [Israel], what’s the reality in Palestine, and what’s going on, what is the truth,” Burnat told the Hollywood Reporter on Feb. 20.The film has won many prestigious awards, including an Outstanding Feature award at the Annual Cinema Eye Honors in January, the World Cinema Directing award at the Sundance Film Festival last year, and others at major European film festivals. Moore showed it at his Traverse City film festival.In another Hollywood Reporter piece, Moore gave his take on this documentary. He said, “I’ve watched this film twice at the Jewish Community Center here in Manhattan, with a primarily Jewish-American audience, and people are visibly moved and shaken by what they’ve seen. And it’s very powerful. You really see what film can do to take people who had a position when they came in, and when they left, they felt something different. It’s very powerful.” (Feb. 20)This courageous documentary is one that all progressive people should see.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Turkey : Justice for Hrant Dink!

first_imgNews TurkeyEurope – Central Asia Condemning abusesProtecting journalists Organized crimeImpunity Help by sharing this information April 28, 2021 Find out more News to go further On the eve of the 14th anniversary of the murder of Turkish-Armenian journalist, writer and intellectual Hrant Dink and just four days ahead of one of the last hearings in the trial of four people accused in connection with his murder, Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls on the Turkish authorities to finally identify all those involved and bring them to justice. Journalists threatened with imprisonment under Turkey’s terrorism law RSF_en Follow the news on Turkey Turkey’s never-ending judicial persecution of former newspaper editor Human rights groups warns European leaders before Turkey summit Receive email alerts April 2, 2021 Find out more TurkeyEurope – Central Asia Condemning abusesProtecting journalists Organized crimeImpunity In the past 14 years, a total of 76 people have been accused of involvement in Dink’s murder. A series of trials have been held without a clear and satisfactory conclusion because the ramifications of the links between hit-man Ogün Samast, who was only 17 at the time, and officials within the police and Turkey’s National Intelligence Organization (MİT) have proved to be very complex and subject to political manipulation.Certain senior military and intelligence officials were excluded from the judicial investigation. The judicial authorities also decided to spare 26 people regarded as responsible for a smear and hate campaign against Dink – a decision which Dink family lawyer Hakan Bakircioglu referred to the European Court of Human Rights in 2019. This is the second time the ECHR has been asked to issue a ruling in connection with the murder. In September 2010, it ordered Turkey to pay 133,000 euros in compensation for failing to protect Dink and for violating his right to freedom of expression.“The Turkish judicial authorities are preparing to issue a verdict although much remains unclarified,” RSF Turkey representative Erol Önderoglu said. “It will be impossible to render the justice we all owe to this journalist and man of peace dedicated to Turkish-Armenian reconciliation unless all those who, in one way or another, were involved in his elimination are clearly identified, tried and punished.”Dink’s was one of the most recent murders of a journalist in Turkey. The trials for the murders of two journalists in the early 1990s, Musa Anterin 1992 and Ugur Mumcuin 1993, are continuing in Ankara in the absence of the perpetrators and instigators. The next hearing in the Anter trial will be on 20 January, and in the Mumcu trial in May.Turkey is ranked 154th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2020 World Press Freedom Index. The founder and editor of the Turkish and Armenian bilingual newspaper Agos, Dink was gunned down in the street outside the newspaper’s headquarters in Istanbul on 19 January 2007, in a murder that left a lasting mark on Turkish society because he had been a leading advocate for Turkey’s democratization and for reconciliation between Turks and Armenians.The Istanbul court trying the four imprisoned defendants – former police intelligence section chief Ramazan Akyürek, former intelligence department section chief Ali Fuat Yilmazer, gendarmerie member Muharrem Demirkale and journalist Ercan Gün – will hear the final defence arguments at a hearing on 22 January, at the end of which it will set a date for the verdict.At the start of this month, the court ordered the arrests of three junior officers in the gendarmerie – Veysel Sahin, Volkan Sahin and Okan Simsek – for “failing to alert their superiors when they had prior knowledge of preparations for the attack against Hrant Dink.” News Hrant Dink (Photo : Fondation Hrant Dink) Organisation News January 18, 2021 Turkey : Justice for Hrant Dink! April 2, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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The Weekend Cooldown Begins As Clouds Roll In

first_img ShareShareTweetSharePin it Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  latest #1 The Weekend Cooldown Begins As Clouds Roll In From STAFF REPORTS Published on Friday, January 19, 2018 | 3:10 pm HerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA Mental Health Chatbot Which Helps People With DepressionHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou’ll Want To Get Married Twice Or Even More Just To Put Them OnHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Vietnamese Stunners That Will Take Your Breath AwayHerbeautyHerbeauty Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Make a comment Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena First Heatwave Expected Next Week More Cool Stuff Community News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimescenter_img EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Community News Subscribe Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Top of the News A low-pressure system has brought cooler temperatures to Pasadena for the weekend, with gusty winds and a chance of light rain and mountain snow showers to the region. Warmer conditions could return next week, according to the National Weather Service.Friday has cooled down to about 62—after Thursday’s high of 80—with a 20 percent chance of showers and a south southeast wind of five to 10 mph becoming. Tonight’s low should be about 42 with a slight chance of rain remaining.Although the sun will be out Saturday, temperatures will continue to hover around 62 with a wind of around 10 mph, and gusts as high as 15 mph. Saturday night will be partly cloudy with a low around 44.Sunday should be mostly sunny, with a high near 63, and Sunday night should be partly cloudy, with a low around 47.A slow warming trend begins Monday as a weak ridge starts to build over the forecast area, the NWS said. Monday should be sunny, with a high near 67. Monday night should be partly cloudy, with a low around 48.Tuesday should be sunny, with a high near 71, and Tuesday night partly cloudy, with a low around 50.Wednesday should be mostly sunny, with a high near 72.By Thursday, clouds should be on the increase again with the possibility of another weak system, but any precipitation should be confined to mostly northern areas, the NWS said. Business Newslast_img read more

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