Customer Q&A: Learning from Honeywell’s Software-Defined Journey

first_imgRP: I imagine that global support and supply chain issues are of key importance in serving your customers.PH: Absolutely. The nature of our industry is that our customers have plants in the most remote corners of the world. So, it was important that we have a solution that we could deploy anywhere and provide support to those same locations. The benefits offered by Dell’s premier support is an element in providing the “Premium” experience that we want for our customers.RP: Fantastic. I know you’ll be speaking about this solution in the Dell Booth at VMworld next week. Any other thoughts on how you see this solution evolving or expanding?PH: This next release of our Premium Platform is just the start of our FX2/VSAN based solution. We intend on providing different offerings that make greater use of the FX2’s flexibility such as offering high density storage version, high density compute version along with a version with high speed processors for specialist compute applications. Additionally, I see this as being just the start of Honeywell’s software defined journey and I see great potential to exploit next some of the advances in software defined networking.RP: Great. Paul, it’s been a pleasure speaking with you, and we look forward to collaborating with you and VMware into the future!PH: Thanks very much Ravi. Appreciate the opportunity to tell your readers more about our solution and I look forward to talking about it more at VMworld next week. Learning directly from our customers by investigating their needs and collaborating with them on solutions is the key to our success as a company. Recently we’ve had the great pleasure of supporting Honeywell Process Solutions as they built out a stack for their Experion System Infrastructure, which takes advantage of Dell OEM and VMware technologies. Read more about the details in our interview below, and be sure to stop by the Dell booth at VMWorld next week to meet Paul and hear more about this industry-first solution.Ravi Pendekanti: Tell me a little about yourself and your role at Honeywell.Paul Hodge: Hi Ravi. Thanks for the invite to chat online. I’m Paul Hodge and I’m the Global Marketing Manager at Honeywell Process Solutions for our Experion System Infrastructure. Honeywell Process Solutions (HPS) is a pioneer in automation control, instrumentation and services for the oil and gas; refining; pulp and paper; industrial power generation; chemicals and petrochemicals; biofuels; life sciences; and metals, minerals and mining industries. Experion is our flagship product for controlling industrial processes.My team’s responsibility is to look after the complete commercial off-the-shelf hardware/software stack that the Experion solution sits on top of. Servers for physical and virtual, thin clients, networking, wireless, operating systems and hypervisor technologies.RP: What problems, specifically, does Experion solve for your customers?PH: Our customers, whether a refinery, a pharmaceutical company, etc., come to us with an industrial process that they want to control. We work with them to identify their specific needs and then supply the software and hardware that is required to control and optimize that asset. Experion is a toolkit that can be programed by Honeywell engineers to control these processes.RP: Let’s talk about the technology. Could you describe the Dell-VMware solution, and what drew you to a modular infrastructure platform, and the FX2 in particular?Dell PowerEdge FX2PH: HPS has a virtualization portfolio called Experion Virtualization Solutions. In this offering, we have two virtual platforms for running our software suite. The Essentials Platform which is based on regular Dell R730 Servers and our Premium Platform which is based on the Dell FX2 and VMware’s VSAN. Our Premium Platform is targeted at those customers with the largest plants and need the upmost reliability, performance and density.In our industry, reliability is key and we always had a vision for a scale out, clustered storage system design to further improve our offering. However, until recently many of the solutions added a layer of complexity that our industry just couldn’t tolerate. VMware’s VSAN changed that situation as we now had a scale out storage technology that was built straight into the hypervisor we were already using. And with the FX2, we have a modular hardware architecture which simplified the hardware part of the offering, gave us excellent flexibility and VM densities.RP: What about systems management and security?PH: In our industry, Ravi, we don’t have the technical resources that would typically be found in other IT areas. So, simplicity in the systems management space is key and one of the keys to simplicity is to reduce the number of interfaces required to manage the system. This is why Dell’s OpenManage integration into VMware’s vCenter was important. Our virtualization customers already use vCenter today and therefore we wanted to provide them the ability to also manage the hardware from that same interface.In what was both a simplicity move and also a security move, we used the switches that are built into the FX2 platform to provide an isolated network for both the VSAN and Fault Tolerance networks. This ensures that no outside events can compromise the integrity of these networks and reduces the impact to the existing networking infrastructure that our customers have onsite.RP: This is an industry, first, correct? Share a little bit about how you see this type of technology impacting the industrial market.PH: Yes. With our Next Generation Premium Platform, Honeywell will be introducing a couple of firsts to the process control industry.The Dell FX2 Server Platform. Honeywell is the first process control vendor to deploy this modular platform in a large scale OEM offeringSoftware Defined Storage. Previous OEM offerings in our industry have used proprietary storage and Honeywell is the asapfirst vendor in the process control industry to use VMware VSAN (Software Defined Storage) in an OEM offeringFault Tolerance. This is the first time that this technology has been deployed in an OEM offering in our industry and will provide hardware protection for mission critical applications through instantaneous, non-disruptive failover.last_img read more

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#WhatWeNeedToSucceed: A Letter to the Next President on Behalf of Women Entrepreneurs

first_img************Note: These recommendations are the points of view of the signatories, not of a specific corporation. [1] McKinsey Global Institute, “The Power of Parity: How advancing women’s equality can add $12 trillion to global growth” (2015): 11. [2] U.S. Department of Commerce Economics and Statistics Administration, “Women-Owned Businesses in the 21st Century” (2010): 6. #WhatWeNeedToSucceedA Letter to the Next President on Behalf of Women EntrepreneursNov. 1, 2016To: Secretary Hillary Clinton / Mr. Donald TrumpDear Madam Secretary / Mr. Trump:We write to you today on behalf of our nation’s leading innovators, entrepreneurs and influencers regarding one of the largest untapped economic and social opportunities in our country – women entrepreneurs. If women and men participated equally in the entrepreneurial ecosystem, the United States’ GDP could rise by $30 billion[1].While women are starting businesses twice as fast as men[2], they face unique challenges, including experiencing disproportionately high failure rates, receiving only seven percent of venture capital and being represented in only seven percent of media stories. Through leadership and sound public policy, our country can benefit from the economic and social opportunity women entrepreneurs cultivate.Over the last month, top business leaders – from enterprise CEOs to leading entrepreneurs – developed a set of policy and leadership recommendations that we believe will help women entrepreneurs start and scale businesses. Our suggestions for the necessary elements for success for women entrepreneurs focus on access to capital, expanding and supporting networks and markets, and addressing the changing face of business through technology.First, we believe that access to and development of financial and human capital is essential to fostering women’s entrepreneurship; this can be supported through:Incentives for individuals and organizations to invest in women-owned companies through venture funds, corporate venture, private equity and social capital.Modernization and expansion of existing government certification, grant and loan programs that help women-owned businesses compete to reflect changing investment models.Promotion and marketing of existing government programs to encourage broader awareness and use.Continuing to foster small-business lending programs, including support for bridge loans.Working with innovators to create new sources of capital such as crowdfunding and impact investments.Encouraging enterprise corporations, federal departments and state/local contracts to increase supplier diversity with a percentage of contracts being awarded to women-owned businesses.Considering a shortening of government payment cycles from 90 days to 30 days for small women-owned suppliers.Expanding access to family-friendly policies including access to high-quality, affordable child care, care-giving and paid family leave policies.Second, as women entrepreneurs and business owners turn to each other for help, we believe that the government and business leaders can help facilitate connections by increasing access to local and global networks and markets, by:Supporting trade agreements that further liberalize trade and open new markets for businesses of all sizes.Promoting global and open standards, and reliable mechanisms for cross-border data transfers and business support services and networks, while providing sufficient protections for privacy and information security.Supporting mentorship efforts through financial support and encouragement of multiplier platforms such as accelerators, continuing education and training programs, and facilitated networking events.Encouraging conscious placement of women on boards, in venture partnerships and on executive teams.Promoting positive success stories of female founders and business owners through the media, conferences and leadership movements.Finally, as industry lines blur, we see technology-driven implications for both government and business. Government and business leaders can help women entrepreneurs thrive in the changing-face of technology, through:Streamlining the process of registering businesses and applying for government resources, particularly when working with strategic offices such as the Patent & Trademark Office, the Department of Commerce, the Small Business Administration and the Federal Drug Administration.Emphasizing Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) and digital literacy in education and early training programs.Working with business leaders and educators to encourage technology training programs to end unconscious biases in the STEM fields, government, corporations and institutions.Enabling access to broadband in all areas of our country.Increasing awareness of options women have to the hardware, software and digital resources they need to scale their companies.Through empowering and promoting women entrepreneurs, we can help create jobs and solve some of our biggest economic and social challenges. Women put 90 percent of their income into their communities and families[3], therefore we believe their success will not only benefit our economy, but will also have a positive impact on society.  We hope that you will make fostering female entrepreneurship a domestic policy priority during your upcoming term and look forward to working with you and your administration to implement the above recommendations and fulfill one of the greatest economic opportunities of our time.Sincerely,Aaron Levie, Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, BoxAjay Banga, President and Chief Executive Officer, MastercardAlex Buck, Vice President, UptakeAlex Chung, Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, GIPHYAlexa von Tobel, Founder, LearnVestAmy Millman, President, Springboard EnterprisesAna Dutra, President and Chief Executive Officer, Executives’ Club of ChicagoAnat Baron, Chief Executive Officer, StashWallAndrea Wishom, Chief Operating Officer, Skywalker Properties Ltd.Andy Dunn, Chief Executive Officer, BonobosBlake Irving, Chief Executive Officer, GoDaddyBrian Lee, Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder, The Honest CompanyCarol Nacy, Chief Executive Officer, SequellaCarolyn Rodz, Founder, Circular BoardCarrie Southworth, Co-Founder, TwigtaleCindy Whitehead, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, The Pink CeilingCornell Iral Haynes II p/k/a Nelly, Chief Executive Officer, Derrty VenturesDan Teran, Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Managed by QDaniel Lubetzky, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Kind SnacksDavid Williams, Managing Principal, Policy, Government Relations, and Corporate Citizenship, DeloitteDeborah Perry Piscione, Founder, Alley to the Valley, Nobiyo FreshwearDebra Sterling, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, GoldieBloxDenise Brosseau, Chief Executive Officer, Thought Leadership LabDiane Hessan, Founder and Chairman, C SpaceDonna Harris, Co-Founder and Co-Chief Executive Officer, 1776Donna M. PetkanicsElizabeth Gore, Entrepreneur-in-Residence, DellErin Gore, Co-Founder and Managing Partner, Gore Family VineyardsIngrid Vanderveldt, Founder and Chairman, EBW2020 and Vanderveldt Global InvestmentsJana Rich, Founder, Rich Talent GroupJean Case, Chief Executive Officer, Case FoundationJennifer Newsom, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, The Representation ProjectJeremy Burton, Chief Marketing Officer, DellJeremy Liew, Managing Director, Lightspeed Venture PartnersJesse Draper, Chief Executive Officer, Halogen VenturesJessica Alba, Founder, The Honest CompanyJessica Malkin, Chief Executive Officer, Chicago Ideas WeekJessica Rovello, Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder, ArkadiumJoanna Rees, Senior Partner, The B TeamJon Steinberg, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, CheddarJules Pieri, Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, The GrommetJulia Hartz, Co-Founder, EventbriteJulie Goonewardene, Associate Vice Chancellor for Innovation and Strategic Investment; Managing Director UT Horizon Fund, University of Texas SystemJulie Smolyansky, Chief Executive Officer, Lifeway FoodsKara Goldin, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, hint Inc.Karen Quintos, Chief Customer Officer, DellKate Brodock, Co-Founder and President, Women 2.0Katia Beauchamp, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, BirchboxKatrina Lake, Chief Executive Officer, StichfixKatrina Markoff, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Vosges Haut-ChocolatLeah Busque, Founder and Executive Chairwoman, TaskRabbitLindsay Holden, Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Long GameLisa Price, Founder, Carol’s DaughterMaria Burns Ortiz, Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder, 7 Generation GamesMarie Forleo, Owner, MarieTV and Marie Forleo InternationalMarius Haas, President and Chief Commercial Officer, Dell EMCMark Gainey, Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, StravaMatt Maloney, Chief Executive Officer, GrubHubMax Levchin, Founder, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, AffirmMelanie Whelan, Chief Executive Officer, SoulCycleMeredith Kendall, Marketing Partner, Lightspeed Venture PartnersMichael Birch, Co-Founder, The BatteryMichael Chaffin, Chief Executive Officer Three Commas LLC, President of Derrty VenturesMichelle Smyth, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Pay Your SelfieNiamh King, Vice President, The Chicago Council on Global AffairsNicole Quinn, Partner, Lightspeed Venture PartnersNina Nashif, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, HealthboxNina Vaca, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Pinnacle GroupPamela Reilly Contag, Chief Executive Officer, ConcentRxRachel Haot, Managing Director, 1776Rhonda Vetere, Chief Technology Officer, Esteé LauderSallie Krawcheck, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, EllevestSarah Kauss, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, S’well BottleShaherose Charania, Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder, Women 2.0Sheila Lirio Marcelo, Founder, Chairwoman & CEO, Care.comStacy Brown-Philpot, Chief Executive Officer, TaskRabbitSteve Case, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Revolution and Chairman of the Case FoundationTiffany Pham, Founder, MogulTina Wells, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Buzz Marketing GroupTrish Costello, Chief Executive Officer, PortfoliaTyler Bosmeny, Chief Executive Officer, CleverWende Zomnir, Founding Partner and Chief Creative Officer, Urban Decay CosmeticsWendy Guilles, President and Chief Executive Officer, Ewing Marion Kauffman FoundationXochi Birch, Co-Founder, The BatteryZaw Thet, Founding Partner, Signia VCCC:  Members of the 115th Congress [3] Phil Borges, Women Empowered: Inspiring Change in the Emerging World (New York: Rizzoli, 2007), 13.last_img read more

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[The Source Podcast] The Dell EMC Storage Portfolio Refresh with Jeff Boudreau

first_imgDell EMC World 2017 included a complete refresh of all our core storage products.   I was able to catch up with Jeff Boudreau (@JeffBoudreau3), President of Dell EMC Storage.   We talked VMAX 950 All-Flash, XtremIO X2, Dell EMC Unity All-Flash, SC 5020, Isilon, and Elastic Cloud Storage (ECS).High end, mid-range and unstructured storage, EVERYTHING was refreshed and upgraded at Dell EMC World 2017. Get the inside scoop directly from the source, this week on Dell EMC The Source.The Source Podcast: Episode #94: The Dell EMC Storage Portfolio Refresh with Jeff BoudreauAudio Playerhttp://traffic.libsyn.com/thesource/DellEMC_The_Source_Episode_94_audio.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Don’t miss “Dell EMC The Source” app in the App Store. Be sure to subscribe to Dell EMC The Source Podcast on iTunes, Stitcher Radio or Google Play and visit the official blog at thesourceblog.emc.comEMC: The Source Podcast is hosted by Sam Marraccini (@SamMarraccini)last_img read more

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Technical Disruptions Emerging in 2020

first_imgLook for lots of quantum announcements and “breakthroughs” in these areas in 2020 but we predict we will still be in the vacuum tube era when 2020 ends.Domain Specific Architectures in Compute will become a reality. We have lived in a world of homogeneous compute for many years. X86 is the compute architecture powering the cloud era and most modern IT. While x86 is still critical to run broad general software, as we enter the AI/Machine Learning era, we need far greater compute capacity per watt and, with Moore’s Law winding down, we need alternative models. The one that seems to be the winner is X86 augmented by domain specific architectures to accelerate specific kinds of software and functions. We already have this for features such as encryption but in 2020 we will see a massive expansion of the available chipsets that accelerate specific domains. Some examples will be a next wave of SmartNICs to offload and accelerate not just networking but higher level functions in the communications stream, general purpose AI/ML chips that are optimized for 4 or 8 bit precision and only accelerate AI/ML tasks, chips that emulate neural networks in silicon, low power AI inferencing chips for the edge, and many more.2020 will be the first year that we have a wide range of domain specific architectures and that will cause us to change system architecture to accommodate them. We will need dense acceleration servicers (Like Dell DSS8440 or 940XA); we will need an ecosystem approach to these accelerators to pre-integrate them into solutions and make consumption easy; and we will need to virtualize and pool them (VMWare Bitfusion as an example) and create APIs to interact with them such as OpenCL and CUDA. By the end of 2020, we predict most enterprises will begin the process of shifting to a heterogeneous compute model built with X86 plus domain specific architectures.5G will change how we think about wireless network capabilities. Early 5G roll outs are happening now but in 2020 we will start to see the full potential of 5G. It clearly will give us higher bandwidth and lower latency than 4G and that’s good but what will change is that we will begin to think about how we use the new capabilities of 5G. New is the ability to program 5G to deliver network slices for specific enterprise applications and users to create one end to end experience via cloud orchestration (we showed this in 2019 at Mobile World Congress).Addictingly, 5G is not one size fits all wireless. Beyond the first use case of Mobile Broad Band (mBB), 5G will add two entirely different capabilities in the wireless systems. First, is Ultra Reliable Low Latency Communication (URLLC) which will make real-time systems like drones and AR more effective. Second, 5G will add massive machine type communications (mMTC) that will optimize 5G for the world of billions of low power lightly connected sensors. However, the biggest new capability 5G will expose is an edge compute model that enterprises will begin to look at to deploy their real-time and data-intensive applications into the 5G network close to the users to get a faster response time for tasks like AI-driven control systems in factories or cars but also will push pre-processing of data to that edge to control the data flow back into data centers and clouds. By the end of 2020, we predict customers will begin to fully understand the significant capability change of 5G and start developing ways to take advantage of it to digitize their businesses.There are many other emerging technologies that will show up in 2020 but these three – 5G, Domain Specific Architectures and Quantum represent the ones that are likely to change the trajectory of the industry over the long term. While Quantum will not do that for many years, what’s exciting about 2020 is that all three of them are becoming real enough to now enter the technical and business dialog for the first time broadly.Dell Technologies is working in all of these areas as we see a data explosion coming that will require orders of magnitude more compute, storage, networking and applications capacity to keep up. We are, understandably, excited that 2020 will be a year where we not only continue to move existing technologies forward but also a year where many potential game-changing technologies become real enough to be part of the strategies our customers are developing to win in the digital transformed world. This year a broad range of emerging technologies will become a tangible part of the broader IT and business dialogue. Here we’ll take a look at long-term disruptions that will be real enough to matter in thinking through the future but possibly not real enough yet to change the market immediately. What all of these share are the potential to dramatically change IT system and industry thinking as well as the world’s technical capability.The “vacuum tube” era of Quantum computing begins. While we are still many years away from a viable quantum computer, 2020 is the year we will see the first real quantum technology applied to solve small problems in a radically new way. Long- term we see three big conditions that must be true before we have viable impactful quantum technology:A viable quantum computing architecture needs to be built. Today we have 25 or 53 qbit systems that are nowhere near the scale needed to run advanced algorithms or solve the theoretical problems quantum may address. We also do not have consensus on what a quantum computer is as different teams propose different models including trapped Ion, trapped photon, etc.Quantum systems must be practical in real-world environments. Today the early systems are exotic to the extreme. Many need supercooled cryogenic systems to exist and they are incredibly fragile. We need quantum qbit capacity to be delivered much as we deliver compute capacity – via standardized chip level building blocks.We need a standardized way to interact via software with quantum. Today there isn’t standard consensus API or even a broad agreement on how quantum sits in the rest of the IT stack. There is a shift to agree that it will not replace traditional compute but look much like an accelerator (GPU, FPGA,  SmartNIC, etc), however, the actual way that happens is still not a reality.last_img read more

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How Technology is Transforming the Circular Economy

first_imgIncreasing efficiencies and shrinking footprints in the IT industryWhen it comes to expanding the circular economy, the IT industry is one of the effort’s greatest enablers — especially when technology provides scalable solutions that drive real value. In fact, global sustainability experts have identified seven distinct types of digital technology that already do or soon will play a critical role in implementing and furthering thousands of circularity initiatives: digital access, cloud, cognitive, blockchain, fast internet, IoT and digital reality. Of those, three are driving particularly impressive advancements across multiple circularity business models:However, the computing power that drives these technologies can use an enormous amount of resources — from electricity to power equipment and water for cooling facilities to physical materials and manufacturing impacts. To take leadership and develop credibility as a circular solution, IT-based businesses need to apply their expertise towards developing solutions that not only help other circularity initiatives in other industries, but also “clean their own house.”Cloud technology holds perhaps the greatest potential for promoting sustainability within the IT industry itself. Virtual servers that operate in the cloud function like physical computing resources, but without additional infrastructure that demands more real estate and more power. The cloud allows organizations to shrink the number of servers, storage, appliances and networking devices that a physical configuration requires. This creates multiple benefits that support a circular economy. For example, virtualization allows for greater utilization of existing resources, which means less equipment and less energy demand. Getting the most from the equipment in use also reduces the amount of resources needed to build new equipment and, at the end of its life, there is also less e-waste — a key environmental responsibility within the technology industry.“If you think about a company with 1,000 servers in a non-virtualized scenario and they virtualized, that could bring it down to 200 servers — an 80% reduction in IT infrastructure. Now, multiply that globally,” says Nicola Peill-Moelter: Director Sustainability Innovation, Office of the CTO, VMware.But the impact doesn’t stop there; it’s exponential, expanding beyond just energy and carbon footprints. Having fewer data centers also reduces the burden on the electric grid, possibly avoiding new power plants and the water and emissions impacts they create. Less equipment also means reduced manufacturing waste. Land that was being used to house this infrastructure can be repurposed with sustainability in mind. Finally, fewer coal-fired plant emissions could mean fewer health problems — saving even more precious global resources.Ultimately, cloud services providers are often in a much better position to manage overall IT equipment utilization, power and cooling efficiency and energy sourcing. This efficiency means fewer servers to perform a set amount of work, maximal energy efficiency and potentially significant reductions in the carbon footprint associated with the computing.Beyond its sustainability benefits, virtualization also allows for organizations to deploy and adjust digital operations more quickly, with easy scalability, which can reduce costs and boost revenue. And as the role of technology in promoting sustainability continues to increase, a multitude of untapped business opportunities are being created as well.Another digital element impacting the IT industry’s own circularity practices is cognitive technologies such as Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML). Workstations from Dell Technologies include underlying firmware that learns how a person uses their computer, and then edits its own code to optimize performance based on those patterns — which drives down energy use and increases user efficiency. Another AI feature from Dell enables predictive maintenance on computer hardware. Instead of waiting for a part to wear out, an algorithm calculates when a part is likely to fail and sends out a replacement part before any outages happen. Any replaced parts that are still functional or reparable are then refurbished and reused.“Any time we can get to the point where we’re taking the latencies out of the system, we drive efficiencies and do better for our world,” says Anthony Dina: Director, Big Data & Analytics, Dell Technologies.Looking forward, it’s important the IT innovations be created not just for innovations’ sake, but instead to develop digital with a purpose. Nicola Peill-Moelter, Director of Sustainability Innovation at VMware, hopes to one day see advances like compostable servers. “The key”, she says with regard to advancements, “is watching — where the world is going, where the customer is going, and where technology is going.”But the impact of technology reaches far beyond its own industry when it comes to the circular economy. My next blog will explore how technology is enabling sustainability in fields as diverse as farming, medicine, and manufacturing — and what the future holds there.last_img read more

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