OUSU votes to cancel “inadequate” Safety Bus service

first_imgOUSU Council voted to cancel the Safety Bus on Wednesday night. The motion, supported by OUSU Council stated that it believed the current Safety Bus service was inadequate and failing Oxford University students.The Safety Bus service is run in partnership with the Oxford Brookes University Students’ Union, and costs OUSU £12,000 per year to run. The service provides a safe means of transport for students late at night.However, no information is available about the number of Oxford University students that use the bus, despite OUSU repeatedly asking Brookes Union to collect the information.A survey conducted two years ago, by the then OUSU Vice-President for Charities and Community, found that 70% of respondents had never used the bus during their time at Oxford University, while 20% had used it once and 10% had used it more than once. The average waiting time for the bus was found to be 16 minutes, with 17% of users having to wait more than 20 minutes for the service. A small number of users who had used the service found the volunteers “confrontational”.The Safety Bus is run with the help of student volunteers from Oxford Brookes who are given training by Brookes Union. However, one of the key concerns raised was that volunteers are not asked to sign any form of contract or agreement regarding their expected conduct.Another concern with the service is that it does not run for 25% of the full Oxford University term. In Trinity term of 2012, OUSU Council mandated the Vice-President for Charities and Community to ensure that the Safety Bus runs the duration of the Oxford University term.The Current OUSU VP for Charities and Community, Daniel Tomlinson, told Cherwell, “Recently, I have been in discussions with Brookes about the Safety Bus and it became clear that they were not able to require the volunteers on the bus to sign codes of conduct for their behaviour, about which we have had concerns. They also won’t look into or keep a record of the number of University of Oxford students that use the bus.“OUSU now has £12,000 to spend on an improved safety scheme, or other things that students think are important. I’ve been mandated to report back to students before the end of term on progress of finding an alternative, and I’ve already started speaking with local taxi companies and Common Room Presidents about potential alternative schemes.”In the debate on the motion, concerns were raised that bus and taxi companies might be reluctant to transport students who were seriously drunk. However, a lack of willingness to reform the current service led to the Council voting to cancel the bus.A first year historian said, “Without the safety bus, I don’t know how I could’ve got a member of my college home one night. They were helpful, and knew what they were doing.”last_img read more

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Fiction but Fact: Stop waiting for a miracle to happen and start doing

first_imgWhat has unfortunately also become part of my daily routine is telling myself “don’t worry, you’ll finish that tomorrow” even though I know I probably won’t. It’s like I keep waiting for something adrenaline-inducing to happen, something that could really justify my procrastination — but nothing ever does. So I wait until the next day, and the next day and the next, praying for something (it’s unclear what) to come.  I’ve been stuck in this same cycle without even realizing it. And it’s only intensified with quarantine. Sure, in the beginning, I was eager to be productive and creative with my time (by securing internships, fine-tuning my photography skills and more), but now I’ve succumbed to a new yet unchanging quarantine routine — one that involves even more intensified procrastination and unproductiveness. As a result, I can’t help but think about an existential play I read in an IB English class in high school. Set to the ringtone “Uplift,” my alarm goes off at precisely 10 a.m. (maybe 9:30 depending on the day). I reach over, turn it off, nap for another five minutes and finally drag myself out of bed. And then my day starts in a similar fashion as yesterday: work out, attend Zoom lectures, finish homework, eat food, FaceTime friends, pray, shower and sleep. I wake up the next day and the next only to do the same routine all over again.  But it never comes.  Shutting off my morning alarm (after the first time it rings) with enthusiasm, I’m ready to embrace tomorrow’s new day — a day that’ll feature less waiting and more doing. From here on out, I’ve promised myself to spice up my dull routine and use newfound time to try new things. And I hope you do the same even after quarantine ends. You, and only you, have the choice to change something in your life.  Stuck in a seemingly endless cycle, the two men are unable to translate a conscious decision into a physical act. So at the end of Act 2, even though Vladimir and Estragon agree to find shelter as the moon appears and night falls, they continue to stand silently, unmoving, like statues, returning to the same spot each day. I’ve never truly understood the meaning of Beckett’s absurd play until now. The extra alone time on my hands has given me a chance to reflect and what I’ve realized is that though we may not like to acknowledge it, many of us have a lot in common with Vladimir and Estragon. Sure, we aren’t wanderers who wear bowler hats, but we nevertheless share their monotonous behavior of waiting. Like Vladimir and Estragon, we’re all in a state of internal pause, sucked into a never-ending time loop. Waiting for a text back. Waiting for a show to return. Waiting for the lecture to end. Waiting for something — whatever it may be. But unlike the two of them, we have the advantage of knowing we have the freedom to choose. And it is this knowledge that will help us break our daily cycle of habit and inaction.  So stop waiting around for something to happen. Just go out there and start doing. center_img Because ultimately, as Vladimir points out to Estragon near the end of Act 2, “We have time to grow old. The air is full of our cries. But habit is a great deadener.”  So let’s try to get rid of our bad habits. We all have the choice to do something better. Let’s stop recreating yesterday while praying today will be miraculously different.  Written in 1949 by Irish playwright Samuel Beckett, the two-act tragicomedy “Waiting for Godot” tells the story of two men, Vladimir and Estragon, waiting for the arrival of a third who (spoiler alert) never comes. Each act follows a day in the life of these two men that mirrors the last with uncanny similarity: They meet the same people and wait for the same person — Godot — over and over again. Vladimir and Estragon believe that waiting for the third man is necessary to receive meaning about their existence and their purpose. Even though he doesn’t come the first day, they determinedly repeat the same monotonous routine the next day.  Blinded by their need for clarity regarding “the meaning of life,” Vladimir and Estragon kill time waiting for someone who supposedly has the answer to it all. In doing so, they fail to realize that this very act of waiting is indeed a choice in itself.  (Sara Heymann | Daily Trojan) On almost every page, there are moments when Estragon turns to Vladimir and asks him what they are doing, as if he’d forgotten what they did the day before. At times, he tells his friend, “Let’s go,” indicating that he wanted to do something else but is met with a fierce response from Vladimir, who spits back, “We can’t … We’re waiting for Godot.” The repetitiveness of  this conversation denotes the majority of the play’s prose, highlighting Beckett’s recurring theme of choice and, more importantly, its significant power.  Aisha Patel is a freshman writing about fiction in parallel to current events. Her column, “Fiction but Fact,” runs every other Wednesday.last_img read more

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Wellington police notes: Monday, July 22, 2013

first_imgWellington Police notes for Monday, July 22, 2013:•8:53 a.m. Officers took a report of suspicious activity in the 1100 block W. Harvey, Wellington.•2:45 p.m. Officers investigated a theft of a bicycle in the 300 block E. Lincoln, Wellington.•12:51 p.m. Officers investigated burglary and theft in the 300 block S. Fair, Wellington.•2 p.m. Officers took a report of found property in the 300 block S. C, Wellington.•3:20 p.m. Officers investigated a theft in the 100 block N. Washington, Wellington.•6:20 p.m. Officers investigated Criminal D a.m.age to Property in the 400 block S. Blaine, Wellington.last_img read more

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Casey steps up to full international against Spain

first_img Harry Casey, the 2011 English boy champion, is the only new cap in the nine-strong England team to face Spain at El Prat on 27th-28th April. Casey (Enfield, Middlesex) steps up from a boy international while the rest of the squad is: Jack Hiluta (Chelmsford, Essex), Nathan Kimsey (Woodhall Spa, Lincolnshire), Garrick Porteous (Bamburgh Castle, Northumberland), Neil Raymond (Corhampton, Hampshire, IoW & CI), Callum Shinkwin (Moor Park, Hertfordshire), Jordan Smith (Bowood G&CC, Wiltshire), Toby Tree (Worthing, Sussex) and Josh White (Chipstead, Surrey). Casey, 20 (image copyright Tom Ward), won the Carris Trophy at Broadstone and followed that by winning the Duke of York Young Champions tournament at Hoylake that same year, which saw him finish third on the Titleist/FootJoy EGU Boys Order of Merit. Last year, when he was a member of the England ‘A’ squad, he finished third in the Tillman Trophy and he also secured a third spot in the 2013 Portuguese Amateur Championship. Hiluta, 23, made his England debut against France last year after winning the Spanish Amateur. The Essex player also pulled on an England shirt for the European Challenge Trophy and the Home Internationals and finished ninth on the 2012 Titleist/FootJoy England Golf Men’s Order of Merit. Kimsey, 20, has enjoyed an exceptional start to 2013. He secured three runners-up spots in Australia during January and February, was a member of England’s victorious team in the European Nations Championship in Spain and recently won the Terra Cotta Invitational against an international field in Florida. A former boy international, he has also represented GB&I against Europe in the St Andrews Trophy and the Jacques Leglise Trophy. He won the McEvoy Trophy in 2011, and last year collected the Darwin Salver, finished third in the South East of England Links Championship, reached the semi-finals of the English Amateur and became a full England cap in the Home Internationals. Porteous, 23, made his full England debut in the 2011 Home Internationals and has played in almost every national team since. He finished third in the individual listings in the European Men’s Challenge Trophy in Iceland last year, was a member of England’s Eisenhower Trophy team in Turkey and represented GB&I in the St Andrews Trophy. This year in Australia, he finished third in the New South Wales Medal and sixth in the Masters of the Amateurs, while he was also a member of England’s winning team in the European Nations Championship in Spain. Raymond, 27, has been an England regular since making his debut against Spain in 2011. Winner of the Brabazon Trophy for the past two years, he was a quarter finalist in last year’s English Amateur and was a team-mate of Porteous in the Eisenhower Trophy and the St Andrews Trophy. He has represented England in Australia for the past two winters, winning the New South Wales Medal last year and reaching the quarter finals of the Australian Amateur Championship in 2013. His successes in 2012 saw him top the Titleist/FootJoy England Golf Men’s Order of Merit. Shinkwin, 19, made his full England debut against France last spring when he won all four of his games. A former boy cap, he was a semi-finalist in the 2011 English Amateur, while last year he won the Hampshire Hog, finished third in the Berkhamsted Trophy and fifth in the Darwin Salver. He was also a member of England’s winning squad in the European Men’s Challenge Trophy in Iceland last year and this year visited Colombia where he won the South American Amateur Championship. Smith, 20, earned his first full England cap in last year’s Home Internationals, having been a semi-finalist in the English Amateur a few weeks earlier. A member of the victorious Wiltshire team in the past two English County Championship finals, he finished runner-up in the Chiberta Grand Prix and fifth in the Biarritz Cup in successive weeks last summer. This year, he has finished seventh behind Shinkwin in the South American Amateur, seventh in the Portuguese Amateur and reached the quarter finals of the Spanish Amateur. Tree, 18, was an under 16 and boys international before making his full England debut last year against France. The English under 14 champion in 2008, he won the under 16 title two years later and has since lifted the Sir Henry Cooper Junior Masters and the Gauteng North Open in South Africa in 2012 and again this year. The Sussex teenager also finished fifth in last year’s English under 18 Championship for the Carris Trophy, reached the quarter finals of the British Boys and represented GB&I in the Jacques Leglise Trophy. He was also in England’s winning European Nations Championship team this year. White, 21, also made his full England debut against France last year having been a boy international. His successes include the Berkshire Trophy for the past two years, a share of the title in last year’s West of England stroke play and the Scrutton Jug for the best aggregate score from the Berkshire and Brabazon Trophies. Twice Surrey champion, he finished fourth on the Titleist/FootJoy England Golf Men’s Order of Merit for 2012 and this year claimed the runners-up spot in the New Year Invitational at St Petersburg in Florida. The biannual match with Spain was inaugurated in 1985 and England has lost only once, at Puerta de Hierro in 2005. Two years ago at The Berkshire, England were facing their first home defeat when they finished the first day three points behind. But they hit back on day two to complete a 13½ – 10½ victory. Play on each day comprises four foursomes and eight singles. 15 Apr 2013 Casey steps up to full international against Spain last_img read more

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Always a captain: Bhaichung Bhutia to shelter over 100 migrant workers in Sikkim

first_imgImage Courtesy: Reuters/PTIAdvertisement 7bbNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vsi49jgWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre E9p29df( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) s2rWould you ever consider trying this?😱idtfCan your students do this? 🌚wchlsRoller skating! Powered by Firework The novel Coronavirus pandemic has found its way into India, and as many other countries of the world, the country is experiencing a 21-day nationwide lock down. While citizens are advised to stay indoors as to ‘break the chain’ of the virus contamination, it has been troublesome for the poor, migrant workers of the country who were employed in many parts of the country. Unable to return to their homes in scarcity of public transport, the workers are facing a worrying situation. However, former Indian Football Team captain and a sporting icon of the country Bhaichung Bhutia, has come up with a generous offer to provide accommodation to the workers in him home state Sikkim.Advertisement Image Courtesy: Reuters/PTIBhutia, who hails from the small town of Tinkitam in South Sikkim, has a property under construction in Lumsey, Tadong in the city of Gangtok. The former international has offered the property as a shelter to the workers who were employed in the state, until the lock down situation in the country restores amidst the COVID-19 woes.Speaking to The Times of India, Bhutia opened up about his generous offer to shelter the workers.Advertisement “The people who are affected the most during the lockdown are migrant workers. There was a huge cue in Sikkim border yesterday. I’ve got a new unfinished building in Gangtok. It should accommodate about 100 people,” the former striker said in the interview.Along with providing a roof over their head, Bhutia has also decided to help the workers with ration and essential commodities, and has decided to team up with local authorities to benefit them.Advertisement “I’ve offered any migrant worker who does not have any house to stay there. We will also provide them some basic ration. I’m also working with the local authorities to see how it can be done. We can support and work together,” the 43 year old added.Although the number of affected patients in the country has already crossed 1400, with 32 deaths, there hasn’t been any reported cases in Sikkim.“Not a single case of corona positive as of now,” Bhutia continued, “so that they (migarant workers) are safe from corona. Doctors can also check. We are trying to request the government.”“At least they will be safe from the Coronavirus in the house when the borders have been shut and locked. They are badly hit they don’t have anywhere to go,” he concluded.The building that will be used as a shelter for the workers, is co-owned by United Sikkim Football Club (USFC). On Facebook, Bhutia posted a message about his benevolent endeavour, and also added the contact info of Arjun Rai, the senior manager of USFC.“I and United Sikkim Football Club would like to offer shelter to those in need in my building in Lumsey, Tadong. Kindly get in touch with me on Facebook or call our Senior manager USFC, Mr Arjun Rai phn. 9434117465 for any help regarding this issue,” Bhutia wrote on Facebook.Also read-New date announced for Tokyo Olympics!Captain Marvel: Sunil Chhetri on how India can fight Coronavirus pandemic Advertisementlast_img read more

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Christmas hockey game to benefit Selkirk Saints Hockey Program

first_imgThe Christmas Classic Hockey game and the Broomball Dance will be joining forces this year at the Complex in Castlegar on (Saturday) December 27.The cause behind the Christmas Classic Hockey game is to raise funds for our Selkirk Saints Championship Hockey Program. All proceeds from the game will be donated to the Selkirk Saints.  The game is from 7-9:00 p.m. at the Castlegar Complex. There are beer gardens, various giveaways and Broomball Dance tickets at the game. After the game, the Broomball Dance will be held in the Complex main banquet hall.All the proceeds from the Dance will go to the Castlegar Broomball Association. The Broomball Dance tickets are $20 each.For more information email [email protected]last_img read more

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Gov’t Wants NSA’s US$284K Case Transferred

first_imgA legal argument as to whether or not a case in which US$247,000 was allegedly confiscated from a group of Korean nationals by officers of the National Security Agency (NSA) should be transferred from Monrovia, in Montserrado County, to another county for hearing will be decided on Friday by Judge Yussif Kaba of the Civil Law Court at the Temple of Justice.Judge Kaba’s decision to reserve ruling on the change of venue for the case came immediately after he listened to the lawyers pushing their respective arguments to convince him.In 2014, the NSA confiscated from a group of Korean businessmen, Messrs Jung Dal Park, Chae Dae Byoung, Chold Jung Woo, Cha Kwang Woon and Aleck Gold, without a court order, the amount of US$247,000. The NSA claimed the cash was ‘counterfeit banknotes,’ and placed it in an escrow account. The remaining US$37,000 was unaccounted for.The Korean investors denied the claim and are seeking legal redress to get their money back from the NSA.At yesterday’s proceedings, state lawyer Cllr. Augustine Fayiah argued that should the matter be decided in Monrovia, there would be no justice for the state on grounds that the issue had been heard on various media outlets on several occasions. According to Cllr. Fayiah, public perception could influence the jury’s decision.They also argued that if they were to hear the matter in Monrovia, prospective jurors already have their minds made up that the allegation was true; and as such, they would not have a fair trial.On the other hand, lawyers for the Koreans argued that if the matter were to go to another county, their clients would be burdened by huge expenses such as hotel bills, food, and transport, among others.Judge Kaba is expected to decide on these arguments on Friday.In their complaint, the Korean businessmen alleged that they withdrew US$284,000 on bank slips from the International Bank (IB) on July 8, 2014. They alleged that while they were going through a business transaction for gold with Nasser Ally, a Lebanese businessman who had invited them to Liberia, the NSA agents, who claimed that the US bills were ‘counterfeit bank notes,’ confiscated their money.They believed that somebody at the IB Bank alerted Fumbah Sirleaf, head of the NSA, who reportedly sent his agents to seize the money. “Further,” they claimed in their complaint, “our clients have presented to us emails which were exchanged with Mr. Ally prior to their visit to Liberia and were shocked that after they were jointly arrested along with Mr. Ally while transacting business, Fumba Sirleaf allegedly instructed his boys to remove Mr. Ally from the midst of the Koreans to an unknown area. After a while, the plain-clothes security returned and confiscated the money claiming it was counterfeit US banknotes.“Of course, Ally from that moment, was seen as ‘cooperating’ with the investigators and was never seen again.“What is mind-boggling is that none of our clients or a third party was present when US$49,300 of the US$284,000 was declared as ‘counterfeit notes’ by the same arresting officers who confiscated our clients’ money.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Chelsea man will reject Spurs to sign for Liverpool – report

first_imgDaniel Sturridge will snub Tottenham to sign for Liverpool next month, according to The Sun.Liverpool are widely expected to buy the forward from Chelsea in a £12m deal when the transfer window opens.And it is claimed that he will sign a £65,000-a-week deal an Anfield rather than rejoin Spurs boss Andre Villas-Boas at White Hart Lane.While Chelsea manager Villas-Boas played Sturridge in a wide position rather than his preferred central role, which is said to be a factor in the player’s supposed decision.The Daily Express say Liverpool remain confident of sealing a deal for Sturridge despite a late hitch leading to a proposed medical being cancelled.The Sun also say QPR are among the clubs that could sign Gary Hooper from Celtic and that Fulham want Nottingham Forest midfielder Lewis McGugan.This page is regularly updated. 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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Airline profits fly with passenger numbers

first_imgIATA boss Alexandre de Juniac. The aviation industry is on track to make a record profit of $US39.4 billion this year as passengers continue to fly in increasing numbers despite a lack-lustre global economy.And in good news for a sector historically plagued by low investor returns, the industry as a whole is tipped to make a return on invested capital that exceeds its cost for the only the second year in its history.The prediction was announced at a recent financial conference in Singapore by new International Air Transport Association director general Alexandre de Juniac. IATA estimates the profit will see industry make a 9.8 percent return on invested capital compared to a 6.8 per cent cost of capital. It comes as an IATA financial analysis argued that July’s 5.9 percent growth in global traffic, the fastest in five months, showed the stimulatory impact of lower fares was outweighing headwinds such as the subdued global economy.The former Air France-KLM chief executive acknowledged the result had been helped by low oil prices but argued it came from hard work, internal restructuring and process re-engineering. He hailed it as a sign that the airline industry was becoming “a normal business and earning normal returns for investors’’.“Passenger demand is resilient beyond expectation in the face of global economic uncertainty (although the same cannot be said for cargo demand),’’ he told the IATA World Financial Symposium. “And while we and our customers have borne some horrific terror attacks, these last few years have not seen the kind of major global crises that marked the early part of this century.’’However, the new IATA boss warned that the industry should not get too comfortable and that the profitability was not evenly spread, with almost 60 per cent of the windfall being generated by US carriers. Other parts of the world were experiencing varying degrees of success and some, such as Brazil, were in crisis, he said.He also pointed to the cyclical nature of the business and potential threats such as quickly rising fuel prices, intensifying terrorist activity, a hard landing by a major economy and a potential impact of the current “protectionist rhetoric’’.While he was not making any predications, the industry needed to be vigilant.“I am a big believer in speed and innovation,’’ he said “We cannot predict the future. But we need to be prepared to react quickly when the environment changes. That’s not easy for any business—and it is a real struggle for process-driven and safety-focused industries like air transport.’’De Juniac emphasised the need for airlines to be high performance organisations so that effective decisions could be made quickly and for finance departments to move away from primarily processing transactions to being “value managers”. There was also an opportunity to use the information collected on customers — big data — to get to know them better.“If you are going to be value managers, it is vital to know where the value is coming from,’’ he said. “We are in a service business. Value is what our customers perceive. At Thales and Air France, the most important person to me was the one who knew our customers and understood what motivated them to buy our products—and what it would take to get them to buy our products more often.’’Other areas which would help airlines included smarter regulations, optimising the value chain, innovation and greater efficiency. Examples included the carbon offset regulation due to be considered by the 39th International Civil Aviation Organisation assembly, starting this week, as well as initiatives to improve passenger experiences at airports and security checkpoints, new settlement regimes and improved distribution systems.The IATA boss said aviation was about freedom and had made global mobility ubiquitous.“For 63 million people, aviation provides the freedom to earn their living,’’ he said. “For 3.8 billion travellers aviation means the freedom to explore the world, build understanding, develop business, make friendships, visit relatives and make their lives better.”last_img read more

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