Autopsy suggests British cameraman was shot by Israeli army

first_img May 16, 2021 Find out more May 28, 2021 Find out more News May 8, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Autopsy suggests British cameraman was shot by Israeli army News Reporters Without Borders called today for the punishment of those responsible for the death of British freelance cameraman James Miller on 2 May after an autopsy revealed he had been shot from the front as he was filming troops in the Gaza Strip .The finding, by Israel’s national forensic institute, tended to confirm the account of witnesses at the scene who said troops opened fire on him and other journalists wearing jackets marked “press” and waving a white flag as they approached the troops. Earlier, the deputy Israeli military commander in Gaza, Col. Avi Levy, said his men had begun shooting after anti-tank weapons were fired at them and that Miller may have been killed by Palestinian gunfire.”We are glad the autopsy was done,” said Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Robert Ménard. “The investigation must now work to establish who was responsible for the shooting. Those who were must be publicly punished and the impunity enjoyed by Israeli soldiers must end.”Miller had been filming Israeli troops destroying a house in Rafah. The troops said they later found him lying on the ground with a neck wound and that he died while waiting for an army helicopter to take him to an Israeli hospital. The army expressed its regret but said he had taken a serious risk being in a war zone.He is the second journalist killed in Israel this year, apparently by army gunfire, and the fifth since the second Intifada began in September 2000. Organisation to go further Follow the news on Israel Israel now holding 13 Palestinian journalists Help by sharing this information center_img News WhatsApp blocks accounts of at least seven Gaza Strip journalists IsraelMiddle East – North Africa Receive email alerts June 3, 2021 Find out more IsraelMiddle East – North Africa News RSF_en RSF asks ICC prosecutor to say whether Israeli airstrikes on media in Gaza constitute war crimeslast_img read more

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Ivy Tech & Deaconess Announce Partnership to Benefit Employees

first_imgThere will be no out-of-pocket tuition costs for Deaconess employees to participate in the program. Tuition will be covered by a combination of financial aid and tuition reimbursement. Another benefit that all employees will receive is deferred tuition (which will cover any initial fees) and in-state tuition rates regardless of their location. Ivy Tech Community College and Deaconess Health System announced an innovative new partnership today, Achieve Your Degree. The Deaconess Achieve Your Degree program will provide guidance and financial assistance to any Deaconess Health System employee interested in pursuing an education at Ivy Tech Community College. “Employers across the state are struggling to find qualified and skilled workers. With the Achieve Your Degree program, Ivy Tech Community College is helping employers to develop that talent from within,” said Ivy Tech Chancellor, Jonathan Weinzapfel. “In addition, by participating in the Achieve your Degree program, Deaconess is investing in their employees and helping them to grow both personally and professionally.”FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare “We are excited to expand our partnership with Ivy Tech Community College and provide our staff the opportunity to further their education and skills training,” said Linda E. White, President and CEO of Deaconess Health System. “Participation in Achieve Your Degree will produce well-educated health care professionals in a variety of important fields while simultaneously addressing the need for post-secondary education.  It’s a win-win situation for our entire community.” The Achieve your Degree program is open to all Deaconess employees who are eligible for tuition reimbursement, and they can begin participating immediately. Employees will also be able to start classes during Ivy Tech’s spring semester, which begins on January 11, 2016. Participants will be encouraged to pursue coursework that is applicable to their current or desired position at Deaconess, and it is anticipated that Nursing, Surgical Technology, CNA, Phlebotomy, Medical Assisting, and Paramedic Science will be among the most frequently selected programs.last_img read more

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Hobby greenhouses

first_imgWith a little effort and forethought, the dream of owning a hobby greenhouse can become reality.As the state’s Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist, Bob Westerfield grows vegetables in a variety of greenhouses on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Ga.If a greenhouse is on your wish list, Westerfield recommends asking yourself a few questions first: Do you want a greenhouse to start vegetable plants early, or do you want to produce enough plants to resell? “A greenhouse is perfect for growing your own transplants, which we all should be doing,” he said. “(Transplants) are so expensive to buy, and you can grow them yourself and save a ton of money.”Plants affect greenhouse sizeWoody ornamentals take more room to grow than vegetable transplants. Westerfield recommends allotting 100 square feet for 100 plant containers. Deciding what you want to grow in your greenhouse will help answer the next question: What size greenhouse do you need?Don’t forget to allow room for racks, shelves and a walkway for accessibility. “We put down gravel first and then put in pavers so we can easily bring in a wheelbarrow,” Westerfield said.Once you determine an approximate size, increase it by 25 to 50 percent. “Anytime I build something, I always wish I had built it bigger,” he said. “Remember, seeds are tiny but they produce a lot of plants.”Building materialsIf you are handy you can build a greenhouse using old scrap metal and wood. Westerfield built his 10-by-14 structural frame greenhouse using treated wood and commercial-grade plastic.“Premade, my greenhouse would have cost $2,000 to $3,000,” he said. “A metal frame will last the longest, but I used treated wood and 20 years later it is still structurally-sound. I have to change the plastic every five years or so.”Westerfield discourages do-it-yourselfers from cutting corners on greenhouse coverings. Use high quality greenhouse-grade plastic with a high mil, or thickness, rating.“Saving money by using painter’s plastic is not really a savings in the long run. If it isn’t UV-treated, it will haze on you and crack and fall apart,” he said. If you plan on buying a greenhouse kit, read customer reviews of product and make sure it includes solid gauge metal and sturdy supplies.Sunlight (and a little shade)No matter how your greenhouse is constructed, the proper location is the key to its effectiveness. Select a level area that receives a lot of morning sunlight. “It doesn’t have to be in full sun,” Westerfield said. “Actually, hobby-scale greenhouses don’t have cooling systems to handle the Georgia sun, so a little afternoon shade will actually be beneficial. If you have to build in full sun, add a shade cloth to help cool the system.”Access to water“If you are too far away from a water source, you are going to get tired of lugging water,” he said. “And if you miss one or two days of watering, it’s done. You have lost your crop.”An automated watering system works best. Westerfield uses misters attached to PVC pipes hanging above the plants. “It comes on by itself and sends down a moist blanket of water,” he said. “And I don’t have to be home for it to come on so life is good.”Misting works best for flats of plants. If your plants are in containers, use a drip irrigation system. TemperatureGreenhouses need to be kept no lower than 45 degrees in the winter and not above 85 degrees in the summer. Attic fans and space heaters can help you meet these requirements.“Humidity is a limiting factor as to why things work or don’t work in greenhouses,” Westerfield said. “If your soil medium has a green tint or is slimy, you need ventilation and less moisture.”Todd Hurt of Macon, Ga., bought an easy-to-assemble greenhouse to protect his Key lime and orange trees from cold temperatures. “I have collected and received as gifts many plants that will not survive our winters, so my little greenhouse gets full,” Hurt said. “I also like to start our vegetable and annual plants from seed. Being able to start our own plants gives us a greater selection of cultivars, and I often have more than enough to give away.”Hurt’s 10-by-10 poly greenhouse cost $250, and he buys replacement poly covers every three years. “I used scrap 2-by-6 lumber to hold the bottom of the poly to the ground on the inside and to build a potting bench and plant bench,” he said.On mild nights, a100-watt light bulb raises the temperature a few degrees. “Other times I use a small electric heater,” Hurt said. “If it gets really cold, my houseplants and herbaceous plants get damaged, but 90 percent of them come back.”Hurt is UGA Extension specialist with the Center for Urban Agriculture in Griffin, Ga.“Of course, like most gardeners, I dream of having a big glass greenhouse but I know if I had one I would spend way more money and time (than) I don’t have right now,” he said. “It is amazing that a little 10-by-10 allows me to do many things without much effort.”For more information, search “hobby greenhouses” on the UGA Extension publications website at www.caes.uga.edu/publications/.last_img read more

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UPDATED: Mindfulness in Schools

first_imgWe’ve been contacted by a number of parents concerned about a new programme called ‘Mindfulness’ which is being trialled in a number of schools around NZ.You can read more about the concerns expressed about the programme HERE (Investigate) and HERE (Southland Times) and HERE “The Messy Truth about Mindfulness“. To be fair, there are also complements for the programme HERE (NZ Herald). There is very little research on the effectiveness of the programme in a classroom setting. One study said “there is no generalised empirical evidence of the efficacy of these interventions.”We also received an excellent review of the programme by a concerned parent who sat in on one of the ‘classes’. READ HEREWhat is significant is that this programme is being pushed in schools at the same time as Bible-in-schools comes under attack by small groups such as the Secular Education Network – and these same groups suddenly go quiet. It’s called ‘selective offence’ – or hypocrisy!We also note that the Australian government has just released a major review of the education curriculum, calling for teachers to go ‘back to basics’ on grammar, punctuation and reading. It also says that western civilisation is being demonised in schools. But here’s the best bit –“History should be revised in order to properly recognise the impact and significance of Australia’s Judaeo-Christian heritage.’’The purpose of this email is simply to remind you of your rights as a parent which we would encourage you to exercise if you wish to. Do not allow the school to fob you off. Are you aware whether this programme is operating in your school?The EDUCATION ACT 1989 says:Section 25A Release from tuition on religious or cultural grounds(1) A student aged 16 and above, or the parent of a student aged under 16, may ask the principal to release the student from tuition in a particular class or subject.(1A) A request under subsection (1) must be made in writing, and at least 24 hours before the start of the tuition.(1B) This section applies only to students enrolled at a State school that is not an integrated school.(2) Unless satisfied that—(a) the parent or student (as the case may be) has asked because of sincerely held religious or cultural views; and(b) the student will be adequately supervised (whether within or outside the school) during the tuition,—the principal shall not release the student.Note that the right applies based on the views of the family – irrespective of what the Ministry of Education may try and label the programme as. It applies to any class or subject which conflicts with your ‘sincerely held religious or cultural view’.The HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION report “Religion in NZ Schools” says:What does the Education Act say about religion in state primary schools? The effect of the Education Act 1964 is that schools do not have to provide religious instruction or observance, but they are permitted to do so under certain conditions. Whether a school includes religion in the day-to-day life of the school or not is up to the school’s Board of Trustees. If a school does provide religious instruction or observe religious customs it must be done in a way that allows students to opt out freely if they want to.• Section 79 allows children to opt out if their parents do not wish them to participate in religious ceremonies or teaching.We would encourage parents to exercise their right to withdraw their child/ren from the programme if they are concerned about the “Mindfulness” programme and the way it is operated in the school, in the same way that we would encourage parents to exercise the same right when groups like Family Planning and Rainbow Youth come in to schools with their dangerous and misleading sex education messages. More information on parents’ rights are on our website HEREPlease remember – it is parents and families, not the schools or the State, who are the Gatekeepers of our children’s minds and hearts.FURTHER READINGThe Messy Truth About MindfulnessWilloughby Britton: Mindful.orgWilloughby Britton is Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Brown University Medical School. She has also been a committed mindfulness practitioner for 20 years. Mindful met up with Britton after the Center for Mindfulness Retreat in Boston in the spring to talk about the theory and practice of mindfulness.Britton’s research is often quoted by traditional media. Here she is, in her own words, talking about some of the messy truths about mindfulness.Meditation is not all peace and calm. Sometimes stuff can come up that needs to be dealt with. Meditation is not the “warm bath” it’s been marketed as in this country, Britton says.“A lot of psychological material is going to come up and be processed. Old resentments, wounds, that kind of thing,” says Britton, “But also some traumatic material if people have a trauma history, it can come up and need additional support or even therapy.” Some of Britton’s research is making headway into understanding “difficult or challenging mind states” among advanced meditators and scholars that can occur as a result of intensive meditation practice.When Britton is approached by educators who want to bring mindfulness to their schools, she attaches a warning: “Be prepared to be wildly successful.” Britton says she’s seen students at Brown get so excited that they spend their summer meditating in the forest, 12 hours a day.“[Meditation leaders] should take responsibility for that and make sure students have some supervision,” she says.http://www.mindful.org/mindfulness-practice/willoughby-britton-the-messy-truth-about-mindfulnessIs mindfulness making us ill?The Guardian (UK) 23 Jan 2016….A 1992 study by David Shapiro, a professor at the University of California, Irvine, found that 63% of the group studied, who had varying degrees of experience in meditation and had each tried mindfulness, had suffered at least one negative effect from meditation retreats, while 7% reported profoundly adverse effects including panic, depression, pain and anxiety. Shapiro’s study was small-scale; several research papers, including a 2011 study by Duke University in North Carolina, have raised concerns at the lack of quality research on the impact of mindfulness, specifically the lack of controlled studies.Research suggests her experience might not be unique. Internet forums abound with people seeking advice after experiencing panic attacks, hearing voices or finding that meditation has deepened their depression after some initial respite. In their recent book, The Buddha Pill, psychologists Miguel Farias and Catherine Wikholm voice concern about the lack of research into the adverse effects of meditation and the “dark side” of mindfulness. “Since the book’s been published, we’ve had a number of emails from people wanting to tell us about adverse effects they have experienced,” Wikholm says. “Often, people have thought they were alone with this, or they blamed themselves, thinking they somehow did it wrong, when actually it doesn’t seem it’s all that uncommon.”Farias feels that media coverage inflates the moderate positive effects of mindfulness, and either doesn’t report or underplays the downsides. “Mindfulness can have negative effects for some people, even if you’re doing it for only 20 minutes a day,” Farias says. “It’s difficult to tell how common [negative] experiences are, because mindfulness researchers have failed to measure them, and may even have discouraged participants from reporting them by attributing the blame to them.”…. There is currently no professionally accredited training for mindfulness teachers, and nothing to stop anyone calling themselves a mindfulness coach, though advocates are calling for that to change. Finding an experienced teacher who comes recommended, and not being afraid to discuss negative side-effects with your teacher or GP, means you’re far more likely to enjoy and benefit from the experience.http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2016/jan/23/is-mindfulness-making-us-illMindfulness can cause panic, depression and anxiety, participants reportChristian Concern 29 January 2016Mindfulness is increasingly becoming the relaxation method of choice, used not only by individuals but by employers and health services. Despite claims that the practice, which involves being still and focusing on one’s breathing and thoughts, can help to tackle stress and depression, critics have attested to its negative effects – suggesting that it is not simply a harmless way to unwind.Dr Peter Jones of truthXchange has spoken about the Buddhist roots of mindfulness, explaining that the process of meditation, which effectively silences the conscience, actually creates a mindset “very opposite to the Christian faith”.Studies have also shown that mindfulness can cause adverse effects. In 1992, one researcher, David Shapiro of the University of California, Irvine, found that 7% of those who practiced mindfulness experienced serious negative reactions, such as panic and depression. Several people have described their personal negative experiences of mindfulness, reporting these same feelings of panic, depression and anxiety.READ MOREMindfulness may not be doing you goodThe Conversation 5 June 2015Mindfulness as a psychological aid is very much in fashion. Recent reports on the latest finding suggested that mindfulness-based cognitive therapy is as effective as anti-depressants in preventing the relapse of recurrent depression.While the authors of the paper interpreted their results in a slightly less positive light, stating that (contrary to their hypothesis) mindfulness was no more effective than medication, the meaning inferred by many in the media was that mindfulness was superior to medication.Mindfulness is a technique extracted from Buddhism where one tries to notice present thoughts, feeling and sensations without judgement. The aim is to create a state of “bare awareness”. What was once a tool for spiritual exploration has been turned into a panacea for the modern age — a cure-all for common human problems, from stress, to anxiety, to depression. By taking this “natural pill” every day, we open ourselves up to the potential for myriad benefits and no ill-effects, unlike synthetic pills, such as anti-depressants, whose potential for negative side-effects we are all aware of.Side effectsMindfulness is presented as a technique that will have lots of positive effects – and only positive effects. It is easy to see why this myth is so widespread. After all, sitting in silence, focusing on your breathing or being aware of the flow of thoughts and feelings would seem like a fairly innocuous activity with little potential for harm.But considering that many of us rarely sit alone with our thoughts, it isn’t hard to see how this might lead to difficult thoughts and emotions rising to the surface for some people – which we may, or may not, be equipped to deal with. Yet the potential for emotional and psychological disturbance is rarely talked about by mindfulness researchers, the media, or mentioned in training courses.And here we come to an important point. Buddhist meditation was designed not to make us happier, but to radically change our sense of self and perception of the world. Given this, it is perhaps not surprising that some will experience negative effects such as dissociation, anxiety and depression. However, like the small print on medication, these “side-effects” in some individuals are not what the creators of this pill are concerned with promoting.For some, penicillin is life saving; for others, it induces a harmful reaction. Just because your friend or family member responds to a pill a certain way, does not mean you will respond in the same way. The same is also true with mindfulness: for some, it may be very effective or it may not work at all, for others, there may be harmful effects.Mindfulness has been separated from its roots, stripped of its ethical and spiritual connotations, and sold to us as a therapeutic tool. While this may not deny its power as a technique to change our state of consciousness and with implications for mental health, it arguably limits its “naturalness”, as well as its potential – at least as originally intended.Many Buddhists are critical of the use of mindfulness for purposes which are very different from the radical shift in perception they aim for — the realisation of “emptiness” and liberation from all attachments. Instead, as Giles Coren recently claimed, this technique has been turned into a McMindfulness which only reinforces one’s egocentric drives.The idea that each of us is unique is a cornerstone of individual-based therapy. But with mindfulness-based approaches there is little space for one’s individuality, in part because it’s a group practice, but also because there has been no serious attempt to address how individuals react differently to this technique.So if you go into it – as with taking any other kind of pill – keep your eyes open. Don’t consume mindfulness blindly.http://theconversation.com/mindfulness-has-lost-its-buddhist-roots-and-it-may-not-be-doing-you-good-42526Panic, depression and stress: The case against meditationNewScientist 14 May 2015Twitching, trembling, panic, disorientation, hallucinations, terror, depression, mania and psychotic breakdown – these are some of the reported effects of meditation. Surprised? We were too.Techniques such as transcendental meditation and mindfulness are promoted as ways of quieting the mind, alleviating pain and anxiety, and even transforming you into a happier and more compassionate person: natural cure-alls without adverse effects. But happiness and de-stressing were not what meditation techniques, with their Buddhist and Hindu roots, were originally developed for. The purpose of meditation was much more radical: to challenge and rupture the idea of who you are, shaking one’s sense of self to the core so you realise there is “nothing there” (Buddhism) or no real differentiation between you and the rest of the universe (Hinduism). So perhaps it is not so surprising that these practices have downsides. http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22630210.500-panic-depression-and-stress-the-case-against-meditation.htmlMindfulness – Treatment can trigger mania, depression and psychosisMailOnline 22 May 2015Meditation and mindfulness is promoted by celebrities including Gwyneth Paltrow and Russell Brand, who boast of its power to help people put stress out of their minds and live for the moment. But the treatment can itself trigger mania, depression, hallucinations and psychosis, psychological studies in the UK and US have found. The practice is part of a growing movement based on ancient Eastern traditions of meditation.However, 60 per cent of people who had been on a meditation retreat had suffered at least one negative side effect, including panic, depression and confusion, a study in the US found. And one in 14 of them suffered ‘profoundly adverse effects’, according to Miguel Farias, head of the brain, belief and behaviour research group at Coventry University and Catherine Wikholm, a researcher in clinical psychology at the University of Surrey.The shortage of rigorous statistical studies into the negative effects of meditation was a ‘scandal’, Dr Farias told The Times. He said: ‘The assumption of the majority of both TM [transcendental meditation] and mindfulness researchers is that meditation can only do one good.http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-3092572/The-dark-meditation-mindfulness-Treatment-trigger-mania-depression-psychosis-new-book-claims.htmlThe Mindfulness BacklashNew York Times 30 June 2014Mindfulness has reached such a level of hipness that it is now suggested as a cure for essentially every ailment. Anxious? Broke? Sneezing? Definitely try meditating.This vogue is in part due to the real benefits of mindfulness, a form of attention and awareness often (but not always) achieved through meditation or yoga. It’s a trend for a reason. But its increasing application to every situation under the sun has some people concerned.In The Atlantic, Tomas Rocha writes about the little-discussed possibility that, for some people, meditation could actually be dangerous. He talks to Dr. Willoughby Britton, a professor of psychiatry and human behavior who works with people who feel they’ve been harmed by meditation — one man described going through “psychological hell” as a result of his practice, while another worried he was “permanently ruined.” Dr. Britton has tracked “dark nights of the soul” — spiritual experiences that are frightening rather than calming — across a variety of religious texts, and she believes that meditation’s potential ill effects have been under-studied. Mr. Rocha writes:“Many people think of meditation only from the perspective of reducing stress and enhancing executive skills such as emotion regulation, attention, and so on. “For Britton, this widespread assumption — that meditation exists only for stress reduction and labor productivity, ‘because that’s what Americans value’ — narrows the scope of the scientific lens. When the time comes to develop hypotheses around the effects of meditation, the only acceptable — and fundable — research questions are the ones that promise to deliver the answers we want to hear.”http://op-talk.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/06/30/the-mindfulness-backlash/?_r=0Mindfulness backlash: Could meditation be bad for your health?The Telegraph 24 October 2015Convinced by studies (such as that by Oxford University in 2014, which found the technique can reduce depression relapses by 44 per cent), the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) now recommends mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for depression.The Mental Health Foundation estimates that 30 per cent of GPs refer patients with mental health issues for mindfulness-based treatment. Persuaded by claims of stress reduction and increased mental clarity, mindfulness has been eagerly adopted by huge companies including Google, Apple, Sony, Ikea and the Department of Health. Mindfulness-based anger management is offered to inmates in prison, and there are calls for mindfulness training to become mandatory in schools.“A good teacher will help you make sense of what emerges through meditation.” Dr Tamara Russell, founder of The Mindfulness Centre of Excellence.“Beneficial findings are overstated in some media reports, whereas studies without the expected results go under the radar. This leads to a skewed picture, wherein the enthusiasm may be ahead of the evidence. Currently, with mindfulness, the evidence is not necessarily consistent or conclusive.” When Farias and Wikholm began researching The Buddha Pill, they were astonished at the paucity of solid studies on the benefits. Then their own research threw up surprising evidence that mindfulness has a range of outcomes – not all positive.“To some, this will be blissful relaxation, but for others the outcome will be emotional distress, hallucinations or perhaps even ending up in a psychiatric ward,” says Farias. “David Shapiro of the University of California, Irvine, found that seven per cent of people on meditation retreats experienced profoundly adverse effects, including panic and depression.”  Psychologists Miguel Farias and Catherine Wikholm, co-authors of The Buddha Pill: Can Meditation Change You?“Mindfulness and meditation are bad for people. People should be thinking… Life is about going out there and meeting people and hearing their thoughts.”  Oxford University professor Theodore Zeldinhttp://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/womens-life/11942320/Mindfulness-backlash-Meditation-bad-for-your-health.htmlThe Dark Knight of the SoulThe Atlantic 24 June 2014In late January this year, Time magazine featured a cover story on “the mindful revolution,” an account of the extent to which mindfulness meditation has diffused into the largest sectors of modern society. Used by “Silicon Valley entrepreneurs, Fortune 500 titans, Pentagon chiefs, and more,” mindfulness meditation is promoted as a means to help Americans work mindfully, eat mindfully, parent mindfully, teach mindfully, take standardized tests mindfully, spend money mindfully, and go to war mindfully. What the cover story did not address are what might be called the revolution’s “dirty laundry.”“We’re not being thorough or honest in our study of contemplative practice,” says Britton.http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/06/the-dark-knight-of-the-souls/372766/The Effectiveness of Mindfulness Training for Children with ADHD and Mindful Parenting for their ParentsJournal of Child and Family Studies Feb 2011This study evaluated the effectiveness of an 8-week mindfulness training for children aged 8–12 with ADHD and parallel mindful parenting training for their parents. Parents (N = 22) completed questionnaires on their child’s ADHD and ODD symptoms, their own ADHD symptoms, parenting stress, parental over-reactivity, permissiveness and mindful awareness before, immediately after the 8-week training and at 8-week follow-up. Teachers reported on ADHD and ODD behaviour of the child. A within-group waitlist was used to control for the effects of time and repeated measurement. Training was delivered in group format. There were no significant changes between wait-list and pre-test, except on the increase of teacher-rated ODD behaviour. There was a significant reduction of parent-rated ADHD behaviour of themselves and their child from pre-to post-test and from pre- to follow-up test. Further, there was a significant increase of mindful awareness from pre-to post-test and a significant reduction of parental stress and over-reactivity from pre-to follow-up test. Teacher-ratings showed non-significant effects. Our study shows preliminary evidence for the effectiveness of mindfulness for children with ADHD and their parents, as rated by parents. However, in the absence of substantial effects on teacher-ratings, we cannot ascertain effects are due to specific treatment procedures. (our emphasis added)http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3267931/ FURTHER READING: Parental Rights in NZ Regarding “Mindfulness”https://www.familyfirst.org.nz/2014/10/parental-rights-regarding-mindfulness/last_img read more

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Young innovators target cabin baggage, fire fighting.

first_imgA clever design that allows passengers to stow cabin baggage under their feet, a new way, an alternative to satellite imagery using aircraft and  a way to quickly turn a military aircraft into a fire-fighting platform.These are among the ideas from five international student teams that will battle it out in Toulouse, France, in the finals of the Airbus “Fly Your Ideas’’ competition.Students around the globe were asked to look at five key challenges to aviation in the 21st century: business models, flight operations, passenger experience, design engineering and manufacturing.The finalists from Australia, France, Hong Kong, Nigeria and the UK were among 348 universities from 89 countries to submit 356 innovative ideas.The entries included strong representation from India (64 teams), China and Hong Kong (44 teams), Spain (29 teams), Indonesia (24 teams) and the UK (20 teams).The finalists will spend a week at the Airbus ProtoSpace facility developing their ideas before presenting them to Airbus and other aviation experts for a 30,000-euro prize.Two teams addressed the increasingly difficult question of cabin baggage.Hong Kong University’s Team DAELead, came up with a design for a private stowage compartment underneath passenger’s feet.The compartment would use space between the cabin floor and the cargo ceiling and flips up so people can store items without them eating into leg room.Local Team PassEx, from the Toulouse-based Institut d’Administration des Entreprises, have devised a revolutionary boarding system that uses A mobile app to assign boarding status according to luggage size.“The Compact Luggage Strategy (CLS) addresses current storage issues in overhead compartments by distributing passengers across the aircraft according to the size of their baggage,’’ Airbus said.The airborne Earth observation concept developed by Surrey University’s team Skyvision turns a commercial airliner into an “earth observation device” by installing observation equipment into an aircraft belly.It is seen as an alternative to satellite imagery in areas such as ecological analysis and urban planning.Nigeria’s team Nevada, from Obafemi Awolowo University, proposed an airport taxiing system that uses sensors and algorithms to automate ground traffic control in a tower and on aircraft to improve traffic flows and reduce emissions.The Royal Melbourne Institute’s Team Aquarius devised a modular system that allows pressurised fire retardant containers to be quickly loaded into an A400M military aircraft which can then be used to fight wildfires.last_img read more

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Biker chic vs the Lightness of lace

first_imgHayden Panettiere flaunts a lace dressFrom vibrant hues to voluminous silhouettes, spring summer brings with it new fashion trends. Chennai, with its vibrant new designers has something for everyone.Spring/Summer 2011 brings the latest trends to Chennai. Watch out for designers Manish Gupta and Anita Dongre whose latest collections include vivid colours and layered silhouettes. Well-known designer Vivek Karunakaran thinks the days of punk might be back. “Bright over the top colours seem to making a comeback. Vibrant pinks; shades of orange and yellow are sure to make this year very colourful,” he says. So be prepared for a very bright summer indeed with colourful clothes and accessories to beat the heat.The other emerging trend is the reappearance of classic lines highlighting the glamour of the 60s. Many designers are reinventing classics, using shine and shimmer to add feminine allure. Classic lace trimmings and intricate detailing are noticeable features in the new collections. The maxi dress, it seems, will continue its reign, so go ahead and grab them in bolder prints and colours. And to accompany, try simple dos like the classic bob or a formal braid. For that luxurious vacation on a cruise, remember to pack vibrant shades of blue, orange, pink and green. Parties and soirees on the other hand require voluminous skirts and sarees with quirky prints. As for clubbing, try outfits that accentuate your curves. Hourglass dresses in metallic tones of black, copper and silver are sure to be a big hit this summer.Shoes for the upcoming season are bold, masculine and monochrome. Wedges, clogs and kitten heels have been reinvented with bold and and innovative fabric. The unanimous decision on makeup seems to be ‘bare and natural’, while hair this season should largely be of the simple and pulled back variety. Accessories seem to be highlighting the same trends: handbags with lace and embroidered details, elaborate necklaces in metallic hues and geometric shapes are sure to rule. Cat-eye sunglasses are all set to make a funky yet vintage splash again this summer.The season’s forecast for men is pretty much along the same lines. Formal occasions might warrant single buttonhole suits and short hair, while the punk rock-era look could spell anything from blue hair to black leather boots.Also watch out for biker babes and boys. Their leather jackets, body piercing and spiked hair sure make a statement. “Go ahead and get skin-tight leather pants and leg defining thigh high boots,” says Karunakaran. With the wind in your hair and the sun on your back, it doesn’t matter whether you choose to toe the line with the classic look or defy the code with your dare devil attitude, the summer is back with a vengeance, and the best way to beat it is to dress up and enjoy.Indian summerGiorgio Armani,Estee Lauder, Chanel and other International brands have launched their look for spring-summer. The make-up forecast includes coral and pink for lips, and the colours of the rainbow for eyes. It’s the season to be adventurous with eyes sporting everything from green to violet.Samantha Kochhar,makeup artist endorses the trend and says the dewy look seen on the ramp is currently in vogue.”Peach lips look great on south Indian complexion and brightens the face. For hair, one should not try and experiment too much. Pulled back hair or plaits look great.”advertisementlast_img read more

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