2016 a year of firsts for the US 7th Fleet

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today 2016 a year of firsts for the US 7th Fleet View post tag: US 7th Fleet Authorities As the U.S. Navy’s 7th Fleet looks back at 2016, it looks back at a year of innovations, new partnerships and upgraded ships.Ships and personnel teamed up with allies and partner nations in more than 110 exercises to exchange information, enhance capabilities and train together throughout 2016.Major exercises included Keen Sword, Ulchi Freedom Guardian, Ssang Yong, and nine different Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) series exercises.The 7th Fleet flagship USS Blue Ridge kicked off her patrol in February, traveling 13,000 nautical miles across the Indo-Asia Pacific to strengthen partnerships and promote peace and stability in the region.The ship visited 10 ports in 7 countries conducting various engagements such as staff talks, sports activities, receptions onboard the ship, community relations events, and much more.During the patrol, various distinguished visitors came onboard including the Sri Lankan President, Maithripala Sirisena, Indian Minister of Defence, Manohar Parrikar, and Secretary of Defense Ash Carter.Of note, Blue Ridge was the first U.S. ship to visit Sri Lanka in five years and for the 46-year-old ship, it visited India for the first time in 17 years.After the patrol, the Blue Ridge entered dry dock at Naval Ship Repair Facility and Japan Regional Maintenance Center (SRF JRMC) to begin its scheduled extended dry-docking selected restricted availability (EDSRA). The ship will receive not only maintenance, but equipment upgrades to enable the ship to carry out its mission in 7th Fleet for many years to come.In February, 7th Fleet welcomed the USS John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group (JCSCSG), also hailed as the Great Green Fleet for its use of alternative fuels. From February to June, the fleet, comprised of approximately 7,000 sailors, completed routine operations in the South China Sea and made port visits across the Indo-Asia Pacific, highlighting the Navy’s efforts to transform its energy use to increase operational capability.In March, JCSSG and other U.S. military forces worked alongside the Republic of Korea armed forces during exercise Foal Eagle. During its four months in 7th Fleet, the JCSSG also conducted passing exercises with the French navy and Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) and in June, participated in Malabar 2016, a trilateral maritime exercise with the Indian navy, JMSDF, and U.S. Navy.In that month the JCSCSG also conducted dual carrier operations with the Ronald Reagan Strike Group in the Philippine Sea. The ships and aircraft assigned to both strike groups conducted coordinated operations in international waters demonstrating the unique capability to operate multiple carrier strike groups in close proximity.The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Barry (DDG 52) joined 7th Fleet March 3 as a Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD)-capable destroyer, bringing the newest Aegis combat system, Baseline 9.C, to 7th Fleet and the capability to fire all Vertical Launch System (VLS) ordnance, including the newest missiles, RIM-161 Standard Missile 3 (SM-3) and RIM-161 Standard Missile 6 (SM-6).Exercise Keen Sword (KS) is the largest joint, bilateral field training exercise between the U.S. military and the Japan Self-Defense Force (JSDF). Approximately, 11,000 U.S. military personnel participated in KS 2017 from October to November, including those assigned to U.S. Forces Japan Headquarters, 5th Air Force, U.S. Naval Forces Japan, U.S. Army Japan, III Marine Expeditionary Force and 7th Fleet.The forces conducted training with JSDF counterparts at military installations throughout mainland Japan, Okinawa and in the air and waters surrounding Japan, Guam and Tinian, to increase combat readiness and interoperability within the framework of the U.S.-Japan alliance.The 11th annual Pacific Partnership mission moved through 7th Fleet from May to September, working alongside one another in six countries to improve disaster response preparedness and enhance relationships in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region.Multinational humanitarian assistance and disaster relief (HADR), medical, and civil-engineering teams partnered with their counterparts in each country to conduct live search and rescue field training exercises, subject matter expert exchanges, cooperative health engagements and community relations events.In addition to training for HADR incidents, assets operating in the 7th Fleet AOO were able to respond to real world incidents in the region.In the aftermath of several devastating earthquakes in Kumamoto, VMM-265 attached to the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, arrived at Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni April 17-18 with approximately eight Ospreys to provide airlift support at the request of the Government of Japan. Sailors, soldiers, airmen and Marines were able to deliver more than 230,000 pounds of relief supplies to Japanese forces operating in remote areas of the quake zone.In November, the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102), operating forward in 7th Fleet under the command of 3rd Fleet, made a historic visit to New Zealand when she participated in the Royal New Zealand Navy’s International Naval Review commemorating the 75th anniversary of the Royal New Zealand Navy, making her the first U.S. Navy ship to visit New Zealand in 30 years.Sampson’s presence in the Western Pacific allowed the ship to join a U.S. Navy P-3C Orion aircraft supporting New Zealand Kaikoura earthquake recovery efforts, at the request of the New Zealand government. View post tag: US Navycenter_img January 4, 2017 2016 a year of firsts for the US 7th Fleet Share this articlelast_img read more

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Islamic studies scholar addresses myths and mores behind the veil

first_imgAmong the popular stereotypes of the Muslim religion, perhaps none is more widely held than the belief that Islam suppresses women.Not so, says Islamic studies scholar Celene Ibrahim, M.Div ’11. In fact, she says, Islam is an “equal-opportunity religion,” whose principles “affirm women’s pursuit of knowledge and literacy; affirm women’s inheritance, earning and managing of wealth; and affirm women’s spiritual potential.”Ibrahim, a scholar in residence at Hebrew College and Andover Newton Theological School and a Muslim chaplain at Tufts University, addressed the stereotypes at “Muslim Feminism,” the second of three Faculty of Arts and Sciences Diversity Dialogues. Understanding each one makes diversity work, lecturer says Intersectionality: The many layers of an individual Related Ibrahim cited a 2011 Pew Research Center study that found “a median of 58 percent [of respondents] across four Western European countries, the U.S., and Russia, called Muslims ‘fanatical.’” She said the media shapes much of the American perception of Muslims as angry and oppressive.Ibrahim acknowledged that while Muslim women are oppressed in some countries, Islamic theology is highly woman-affirming. “Muslim feminists often struggle … to reform misogynistic ideas, customs, and/or legal codes that don’t reflect the teaching of the Prophet Muhammad,” she said.In addition, she said, in places like America, much of what Muslim women do is a matter of choice. “There is great diversity in the Muslim community,” she said. While some Westerners may assume that Muslim women who wear clothing that covers everything but their eyes, pray in gender-segregated spaces, or attend women-only athletic facilities are being forced into an unwanted modesty, “There are some spaces where gender segregation is appropriate,” Ibrahim said.Celene Ibrahim addressed an audience of 130 people at the Diversity Dialogue discussion at Radcliffe Institute’s Knafel Center. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerIbrahim talked at length about the symbolic, religious, and practical purposes of the hijab, the headscarf worn by many, but not all, Muslim women. The headscarf is a symbol that has a certain power, she said.“Wearing the headscarf is a matter of feminism, aesthetics, and solidarity for me,” she wrote in a New York Times op-ed piece earlier this year. “The hijab is fun and dignifying … it’s part of my morning routine.”Non-Muslim women who want to show support sometimes participate in the annual Feb. 1 Hijab Solidarity Day, but Ibrahim cautioned that some people believe that may hurt women who wear them every day of the year.“Some say that only perpetuates the sexist dogma of conservative clerics,” she said.Ibrahim also challenged the misconception that Muslim women are not allowed to pursue education. She pointed out that Muhammad directed that every person must seek knowledge, regardless of gender.“Seeking knowledge is a duty upon every Muslim,” she said. Citing as examples Farah Pandith, the State Department’s first ever-special representative to Muslim communities; architect Maryam Eskandari; sitcom creator Zarqa Nawaz; and Ghazala Khan, the gold star mother of a U.S. Army captain killed in Iraq, Ibrahim said, “For Muslim women there is not a single path. Their influence is broad and takes many different paths.”Joshua Dunn, procurement administrator in the FAS Office of Administration and Finance, one of the more than 130 people who attended the dialogue at Radcliffe Institute’s Knafel Center, said Ibrahim “challenged me to think outside the box about what it must be like to a Muslim woman living in the U.S. … Certain customs might be a matter of perspective and we should not automatically view [them] as oppressive.“I thought she laid out a compelling vision of feminist ethics and the virtues of a pluralistic society that values all cultures and religious beliefs,” he said.The Diversity Dialogues are offered by the FAS Dean’s Office, FAS Human Resources, and the FAS Office of Diversity Relations and Communications. The third and final dialogue for the academic year, “Overcoming Obstacles,” featuring Eric Alva, retired Marine staff sergeant and gay rights activist, will take place on April 5, 2017.SaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSavelast_img read more

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Strikers wasting too many chances a big concern: Harendra Singh

first_imgMuscat: Following the goalless draw against Malaysia in the Asian Champions Trophy, a dejected Indian men’s hockey team chief coach Harendra Singh on Wednesday acknowledged that his strikers wasted too many chances despite dominating most sessions of the match.“I am not happy at the way our strikers continue to miss scoring opportunities,” Harendra said after India were held to a goalless draw by Malaysia in their preliminary league encounter here late on Tuesday.The goalless draw on Tuesday night left both defending champions India and Asian Games silver medallists Malaysia on 10 points from four outings. India, however, stayed atop the standings on the basis of a superior goal difference.“The strikers need to work harder. Things will not come on a platter every time,” said Harendra, dejected that India failed to convert half a dozen scoring opportunities against Malaysia.This was the first time India was playing Malaysia since the 2018 Asian Games, where Malaysia scored an upset win to advance to the final.Harendra said modern hockey requires quick decision making by players. He said the strikers need to be quick in their decision making as rivals would always try to deny them time and space in the scoring zone.“We have to do better inside the circle,” he pointed out.Harendra said Malaysia was expected to crowd their defense and deny space for the Indian strikers, but it was up to the Indian players to create a passage through the packed defense.Malaysia coach Roelant Oltmans, who was India’s coach until last year, said the game proceeded as expected.“We did really well in how we defended, but I am slightly disappointed with what we did when in possession of the ball,” said Oltmans.“We could have done a lot more. We could have created opportunities for ourselves. That is something we need to improve,” said Oltmans, who took charge of the Malaysian team after the Asian Games that ended last month.For three Asian teams — India, Pakistan, and Malaysia — this event provides the last competitive games ahead of next month’s World Cup in India. (IANS)last_img read more

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