New springboard for tech leadership

first_imgHarvard Business School (HBS) and the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have announced a new joint master’s degree program. The two-year, full-time program, which will confer both a master of science in engineering sciences and a master of business administration, begins in August 2018.Designed to train future leaders of technology ventures, the program will provide a strong foundation in general management, build design skills, and extend students’ understanding of engineering. Prospective students must have an undergraduate degree in engineering, computer science, or a related technical field and at least two years of full-time work experience. The program will leverage existing HBS and SEAS curricula, as well as several new courses designed and taught jointly by faculty from both Schools.“Finding effective solutions to the most daunting challenges calls for thinking across the boundaries of disciplines,” said HBS Dean Nitin Nohria, the George F. Baker Professor of Administration. “The faculty who created this program designed it specifically to bridge the divide between engineering and business for aspiring leaders in the tech sector who want to drive and manage innovation throughout their organizations.”“This is a truly collaborative endeavor between HBS and SEAS,” said Frank Doyle, dean of SEAS and the John A. and Elizabeth S. Armstrong Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences. “The expansion of SEAS to a state-of-the-art science and engineering complex across the street from HBS presents a compelling opportunity to leverage the resources of our Schools. This collaborative program will meet the needs of an increasingly technology-driven world, in which breakthrough solutions to societal problems require deep knowledge of both engineering and business.”The program spans four semesters, augmented by additional summer and January term coursework. In the first year of the program, students will take a system engineering course that emphasizes an interdisciplinary approach to analyzing complex systems, as well as the HBS MBA required curriculum, which conveys concepts and builds skills across disciplines relevant to general management, including marketing, organizational behavior, and finance.In the second year, students will take electives at each School. The program also features three new design courses that emphasize learning-by-doing and build students’ skills with human-centered design and lean experimentation methods. As graduate students at SEAS, students will be formally enrolled in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.To gain admission to the MS/MBA program, students must:Hold an engineering, computer science, or related undergraduate degree, with a record of outstanding academic achievement;Have at least two years of full-time work experience, ideally in designing and/or developing technology-intensive products;Meet the criteria for admission to both the HBS MBA program and the SEAS MS program.“We are looking for individuals who want to balance their passion for engineering and innovation with a deep understanding of management and leadership,” said Chad Losee, managing director of MBA admissions and financial aid at HBS. “The students we are seeking have already distinguished themselves technically; this program will help propel them into leadership roles.”Details about the application process can be found here. Interested students can receive updates on the program by indicating their interest in the MS/MBA here.last_img read more

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Bloomberg Harvard City Leadership Initiative announces third class of mayors

first_imgThe Bloomberg Harvard City Leadership Initiative announced on Monday the third class of 41 mayors from around the world who will participate in the yearlong education and professional development program designed specifically for municipal leaders. The participants are meeting with Harvard faculty and management experts in New York City this week for a three-day, immersive classroom experience to kick off the program.The demographics of the group reflect global trends toward more diverse city leadership. Nearly half are women, with three serving as her city’s first female mayor; more than a third are African American or Hispanic. Nearly half have spent time in the private sector, and 90 percent have state, regional, or county government experience.The initiative is a collaboration between Bloomberg Philanthropies, Harvard Kennedy School, and Harvard Business School. City leaders will work with University faculty, staff, and students, alongside experts from Bloomberg Philanthropies’ worldwide network over the course of the year in the classroom, online, and in the field.The private sector invests more than $42 billion each year in executive development, but there is no equivalent in the public sector. The Bloomberg Harvard City Leadership Initiative aims to help fill that void.“Cities are leading the way on most of the big issues we face, from fighting climate change, to protecting public health, to creating new jobs and giving people new skills,” said Michael R. Bloomberg, founder of Bloomberg LP and Bloomberg Philanthropies, and three-term mayor of New York City. “The more we do to support mayors, the faster progress can happen — and that’s what this program is all about. This year’s group brings a wide range of perspectives on shared challenges, and we’re looking forward to seeing the results.”Participants include: Mohammed Adjei Sowah (Accra, Ghana), Sandy Verschoor (Adelaide, Australia), Kelly Girtz (Athens, Ga.), Hardie Davis (Augusta, Ga.), Richard Irvin (Aurora, Ill.), Steve Adler (Austin, Texas), Matúš Vallo (Bratislava, Slovakia), Byron Brown (Buffalo, N.Y.), Lori Lightfoot (Chicago), Mary Salas (Chula Vista, Calif.), Scott Brook (Coral Springs, Fla.), Eric Johnson ’98 (Dallas), Nan Whaley (Dayton, Ohio), Jenn Daniels (Gilbert, Ariz.), Eckart Würzner (Heidelberg, Germany), Steve Williams (Huntington, W.V.), Danene Sorace (Lancaster, Pa.), Leirion Gaylor Baird (Lincoln, Neb.), Satya Rhodes-Conway (Madison, Wis.), Jacob Frey (Minneapolis), Bonnie Crombie (Mississauga, Ontario), Yxstian Gutierrez (Moreno Valley, Calif.), LaToya Cantrell (New Orleans), Ras Baraka (Newark, N.J.), Nuatali Nelmes (Newcastle, Australia), David Holt (Oklahoma City), Kate Gallego ’04 (Phoenix), Nicholas Gradisar (Pueblo, Colo.), Claudio Castro (Renca, Chile), Hillary Schieve (Reno, Nev.), Kim Norton (Rochester, Minn.), Lovely Warren (Rochester, N.Y.), London Breed (San Francisco), Miguel Trevino (San Pedro, Mexico), Adrian Perkins, J.D. ’18 (Shreveport, La.), Rick Kriseman (St. Petersburg, Fla.), Anna König Jerlmyr (Stockholm), Jane Castor (Tampa, Fla.), Reed Gusciora (Trenton, N.J.), Rafał Trzaskowski (Warsaw, Poland), and Brian Bowman (Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada).“The Bloomberg Harvard City Leadership Initiative provides an opportunity for mayors and their teams to share best practices with one another in a setting that encourages the free exchange of ideas and the thoughtful application of knowledge,” said Harvard President Larry Bacow. “We are delighted to create a nutrient-rich environment in which those who shape the future of cities across the country and around the world have an opportunity to leverage the considerable intellectual capital of our faculty.” Related Bloomberg program has worked with officials to help them govern more effectively, creatively Through the Bloomberg Harvard Initiative, student fellows help mayors to improve lives center_img A summer of service to cities Mayoral initiative heads for year twolast_img read more

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