California Mortgage Company Looks to Improve Customers’ Efficiency, Reduce Risks

first_img About Author: Mike Albanese in Featured, News Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago May 17, 2019 875 Views Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Subscribe California Mortgage Company Looks to Improve Customers’ Efficiency, Reduce Risks Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Tagged with: mortgage mortgage companies  Print This Post Mike Albanese is a reporter for DS News and MReport. He is a University of Alabama graduate with a degree in journalism and a minor in communications. He has worked for publications—both print and online—covering numerous beats. A Connecticut native, Albanese currently resides in Lewisville. Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Home / Featured / California Mortgage Company Looks to Improve Customers’ Efficiency, Reduce Risks The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days agocenter_img The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago mortgage mortgage companies 2019-05-17 Mike Albanese The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Share Save Previous: WFG Releases DecisionPoint Next: Promontory Fulfillment Services Integrates with ComplianceEase Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Related Articles Is Rise in Forbearance Volume Cause for Concern? 2 days ago The California-based First American Mortgage Solutions, LLC, part of the First American family of companies, announced the launch of its RegsData Compliance Suite, a comprehensive and flexible loan-level solution for managing compliance risk earlier in the mortgage application, increasing efficiency, while reducing risk and costs.Built for mortgage lenders and servicers, investors, auditors, due diligence and quality control providers, RegsData Compliance Suite delivers bundled compliance reports or individual tests as application program interfaces (APIs) for easy integration at any point along the loan lifecycle. It incorporates First American Mortgage Solutions’ automated regulatory compliance product, formerly known as PredProtect, and features:RegsData Report – Runs numerous federal, state and local jurisdictional compliance checks for QM, TRID, HOEPA and other compliance tests on loans in real-time and alerts users to any potential violations so corrections can be made promptly.RegsData APIs – All component parts of the RegsData Report can be pulled using APIs through the First American Mortgage Solutions’ Digital Gateway to meet custom integration needs.Third Party Review and Monitoring – Comprehensive counterparty oversight and management with 24/7 monitoring of watchlists and licenses.“RegsData Suite is flexible and can be customized to fit the varied needs of our customers, including how it is consumed, the features it offers and its ability to manage workflow. Our extensive critical regulatory tests, which are independently certified by outside legal counsel at state and local levels, empower our customers to manage compliance risk with confidence,” said Kevin Wall, President of First American Mortgage Solutions. First American Mortgage Solutions, a part of the First American family of companies, provides solutions for residential lenders and servicers covering the entire loan spectrum, including complete products, microservices and API.First American Mortgage Solutions, together with First American’s broader capabilities, serves as a single source for title and settlement, home equity, data and analytics, fraud and verification, regulatory compliance, valuation and collateral risk, post-closing and default services. More Sign up for DS News Daily last_img read more

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News story: Carillion: Official Receiver’s update

first_imgTo be notified of future updates from the Official Receiver please register to receive an email alert. A spokesperson for the Official Receiver said: Secure on-going employment has been confirmed for a further 101 members of staff who are transferring to new suppliers, taking the total number of jobs saved to 11,739. We continue to discuss with potential purchases for Carillion’s remaining contracts, as well as remain committed to engaging with staff, elected employee representatives and unions as these arrangements are confirmed. Regrettably eight job losses are being announced and those leaving the business this week will be provided with every support to find new work by Jobcentre Plus’ Rapid Response Service. In total, to date 11,739 jobs (64% of the pre-liquidation workforce) have been saved and 2,340 (13%) jobs have been made redundant through the liquidation A further 1,121 employees have left the business during the liquidation through finding new work, retirement or for other reasons This information does not include jobs attached to contracts where an intention to purchase has been entered into but has not yet formally occurred Just under 3,000 employees are currently retained to enable Carillion to deliver the remaining services it is providing for public and private sector customers until decisions are taken to transfer or cease these contracts Further information about rights in redundancy is available on gov.uk Further informationlast_img read more

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Hobby greenhouses

first_imgWith a little effort and forethought, the dream of owning a hobby greenhouse can become reality.As the state’s Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist, Bob Westerfield grows vegetables in a variety of greenhouses on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Ga.If a greenhouse is on your wish list, Westerfield recommends asking yourself a few questions first: Do you want a greenhouse to start vegetable plants early, or do you want to produce enough plants to resell? “A greenhouse is perfect for growing your own transplants, which we all should be doing,” he said. “(Transplants) are so expensive to buy, and you can grow them yourself and save a ton of money.”Plants affect greenhouse sizeWoody ornamentals take more room to grow than vegetable transplants. Westerfield recommends allotting 100 square feet for 100 plant containers. Deciding what you want to grow in your greenhouse will help answer the next question: What size greenhouse do you need?Don’t forget to allow room for racks, shelves and a walkway for accessibility. “We put down gravel first and then put in pavers so we can easily bring in a wheelbarrow,” Westerfield said.Once you determine an approximate size, increase it by 25 to 50 percent. “Anytime I build something, I always wish I had built it bigger,” he said. “Remember, seeds are tiny but they produce a lot of plants.”Building materialsIf you are handy you can build a greenhouse using old scrap metal and wood. Westerfield built his 10-by-14 structural frame greenhouse using treated wood and commercial-grade plastic.“Premade, my greenhouse would have cost $2,000 to $3,000,” he said. “A metal frame will last the longest, but I used treated wood and 20 years later it is still structurally-sound. I have to change the plastic every five years or so.”Westerfield discourages do-it-yourselfers from cutting corners on greenhouse coverings. Use high quality greenhouse-grade plastic with a high mil, or thickness, rating.“Saving money by using painter’s plastic is not really a savings in the long run. If it isn’t UV-treated, it will haze on you and crack and fall apart,” he said. If you plan on buying a greenhouse kit, read customer reviews of product and make sure it includes solid gauge metal and sturdy supplies.Sunlight (and a little shade)No matter how your greenhouse is constructed, the proper location is the key to its effectiveness. Select a level area that receives a lot of morning sunlight. “It doesn’t have to be in full sun,” Westerfield said. “Actually, hobby-scale greenhouses don’t have cooling systems to handle the Georgia sun, so a little afternoon shade will actually be beneficial. If you have to build in full sun, add a shade cloth to help cool the system.”Access to water“If you are too far away from a water source, you are going to get tired of lugging water,” he said. “And if you miss one or two days of watering, it’s done. You have lost your crop.”An automated watering system works best. Westerfield uses misters attached to PVC pipes hanging above the plants. “It comes on by itself and sends down a moist blanket of water,” he said. “And I don’t have to be home for it to come on so life is good.”Misting works best for flats of plants. If your plants are in containers, use a drip irrigation system. TemperatureGreenhouses need to be kept no lower than 45 degrees in the winter and not above 85 degrees in the summer. Attic fans and space heaters can help you meet these requirements.“Humidity is a limiting factor as to why things work or don’t work in greenhouses,” Westerfield said. “If your soil medium has a green tint or is slimy, you need ventilation and less moisture.”Todd Hurt of Macon, Ga., bought an easy-to-assemble greenhouse to protect his Key lime and orange trees from cold temperatures. “I have collected and received as gifts many plants that will not survive our winters, so my little greenhouse gets full,” Hurt said. “I also like to start our vegetable and annual plants from seed. Being able to start our own plants gives us a greater selection of cultivars, and I often have more than enough to give away.”Hurt’s 10-by-10 poly greenhouse cost $250, and he buys replacement poly covers every three years. “I used scrap 2-by-6 lumber to hold the bottom of the poly to the ground on the inside and to build a potting bench and plant bench,” he said.On mild nights, a100-watt light bulb raises the temperature a few degrees. “Other times I use a small electric heater,” Hurt said. “If it gets really cold, my houseplants and herbaceous plants get damaged, but 90 percent of them come back.”Hurt is UGA Extension specialist with the Center for Urban Agriculture in Griffin, Ga.“Of course, like most gardeners, I dream of having a big glass greenhouse but I know if I had one I would spend way more money and time (than) I don’t have right now,” he said. “It is amazing that a little 10-by-10 allows me to do many things without much effort.”For more information, search “hobby greenhouses” on the UGA Extension publications website at www.caes.uga.edu/publications/.last_img read more

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William Westmeier

first_imgWilliam “Bill” Westmeier, 66, of Versailles passed away at 6:15am, Wednesday, January 30, 2019 at his home. He was born at Milan on March 21, 1952 the son of Aaron and Geneva Kieffer Westmeier. He was married to Mary Ann Strunck on April 24, 2004 and she survives. Other survivors include one son Aaron Westmeier of Versailles; step-son Vincent (Jessica) Kieffer of Versailles; step-daughter Vanessa Kieffer of Versailles; grandchildren Evan, Lilly, Alex, Abby, Devin, Anna Rae, and Jacob; two sisters Linda (Terry) Hillman of Connersville, and Patricia (Paul) Reese of Milan. He was preceded in death by his parents and his daughter Clarissa Lee Westemeier. Mr. Westmeier was a 1970 graduate of South Ripley High School. He was a 30 year employee of Cummins Engine in Columbus where he worked in various positions. After his retirement from Cummins Bill worked in maintenance for the Waters of Dillsboro, but his favorite job was being a farmer like his father was. Bill was always of a kind heart and gentle soul and some of his favorite things were watching the Three Stooges, playing euchre, and spending time with his family. Bill was a member of the St. Paul Lutheran Church at Olean. Funeral services will be held on Saturday, February 2nd at 11am at the Stratton-Karsteter Funeral Home in Versailles with Rev. Curtis Black officiating. Burial will be in the Cliff Hill Cemetery in Versailles. Visitation will be on Friday from 4pm to 7pm. Memorials may be given to the Special Olympics in care of the funeral home.last_img read more

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