Odds & Ends: La La Land Wins big at Critics’ Choice Awards & More

first_img View Comments Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today and over the weekend. La La Land Wins big at Critics’ Choice AwardsBuzz around La La Land continues to build—the movie musical garnered eight trophies at the Critics’ Choice Awards on December 11, including Best Picture, Best Director for Damien Chazelle and Best Song for “City of Stars,” penned by Justin Hurwitz, Benj Pasek and Justin Paul. Viola Davis won for reprising her Tony-winning role in the Fences film adaptation; other stage faves to take home prizes included Tony winners Jane Krakowski for Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt and James Corden for Best Talk Show. La La Land also led the pack with the Golden Globe nominations earlier today, receiving seven.Room Service Revival Eyes Broadway BowA revival of Room Service, the 1937 screwball comedy by Allen Boretz and John Murray, is aiming for the Great White Way in the 2017-18 season. The play, perhaps best known to audiences through the Marx Brothers’ film adaptation, tells the story of a desperate and nimble-witted producer, living on credit with several actors in a Broadway hotel. Room Service has not been seen on the Main Stem since a production in 1953, which featured a young Jack Lemmon; it last ran in New York in 2006, when it played off-Broadway.Santino Fontana’s Impossible MonstersSantino Fontana has just wrapped Nathan Catucci’s indie thriller Impossible Monsters. The Cinderella Tony nominee stars as Dr. Rich Freeman, a psychology professor who conducts a sleep study that goes wrong. Check out The Hollywood Reporter’s first look at the movie here.Company Set for London’s The MiserFull casting has been announced for the upcoming West End revival of Molière’s The Miser. Joining the previously reported Griff Rhys Jones and Lee Mack will be Mathew Horne, Saikat Ahamed, Ryan Gage, Simon Holmes, Andi Osho, Michael Webber, Ellie White and Katy Wix. Adapted by Sean Foley and Phil Porter, the production will open at the Garrick Theatre in London’s West End on March 1, 2017 and officially open on March 13.P.S. Bros watch Hairspray Live! below, courtesy of Matt Rodin. ‘La La Land’ (Photo: Dale Robinette)last_img read more

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Daily Dirt: Outdoor News for May 13, 2013

first_imgYour outdoor news bulletin for May 13, the day Jamestown was founded on the west bank of the James River, marking the beginning of the American empire, and the beginning of the end for the Native Americans:They’re BAAAAACK!It’s been building for a while, and unlike Carmageddon, this is actually going to happen. The 17-year cicadas have been spotted in the past couple of days in Maryland and Northern Virginia, signaling the start of CICADAPOCALYPSE, or alternately SWARMAGGEDON, because what would we be if we didn’t give any hint of a big event a world-ending themed nickname. Some may lose their minds due to the red, beady eyes, or the 90-decibel mating call, but most will just grin and bear it as billions of little bugs with wings invade the East Coast. If you are feeling adventurous and have an iron stomach, you can even munch on the critters. Although, their whole existence consists of living underground, digging their way out, shedding their exoskeleton, mating with other beady eyed cicadas, and then digging back into the ground and dying or laying eggs, so….yeah, go ahead and eat ’em.When Bears Attack…Power PolesBears are a curious lot. So successful in preventing forest fires (at least that one is) and such a great image in the cartoon world (Yogi, Baloo, Winnie), and yet problems still persist between bears and humans, as surprising as that can be. The Daily Progress is reporting that power companies in Virginia are under attack from black bears, and the results are staggering – actually its the utility poles that are under attack, and the poles themselves are the ones staggering. Apparently, black bears love to shred the outer layers of the chestnut poles by using them as backscratchers, claw sharpeners, and messaging – imagine the pole as a rudimentary ursa-Facebook bears use to let other bears know they are around, will be heading down to the creek later. In many cases, the bear activity whittles the poles down to nothing, at which point the fall over, knocking out power. Steel poles are not feasible so the power companies are working on alternate solutions including paint and different wood treatments to keep the bears off the poles.Weird Beard Cleared…by the opposite sex, that is. It was a strange week for the men who wear beards in the U.S., which is pretty much everyone within 2 degrees of the outdoor industry. Last spring a study by psychologists indicated that facial hair was unattractive to the opposite sex, beard enthusiasts were up in arms. “Of course beards on women are unattractive. What’s your point?!?!” they screamed. Just kidding, the study was obviously about men, but had significant flaws like comparing a fresh shave with a month of untouched growth. Of course a hairless chin is going to beat out a hybrid Grizzly Adams/Ted Kaczynski/Forest Gump after running across the U.S. rat’s nest of a gross beard. Finally, this week, a different study – because this is what science is for, people – rated four different stages of growth (clean, stubble, heavy stubble, and full on beard), and concluded that heavy stubble was the most desirable.last_img read more

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Good Governance: Board member to CEO? A bad idea!

first_img continue reading » As of this writing I’ve served on five corporate boards of directors and worked with 329 client boards on governance. I’ve experienced three CEO transitions from the board member perspective and helped numerous client boards with the process of new CEO recruitment and selection. In a few cases, a sitting board member had campaigned or was actively campaigning for the CEO job. I have found that circumstance fraught with problems.In the past 24 months, I’ve had a supervisory committee chair tell me he could be a better CEO and a board chair actively suggest to the board in executive session that he should take over. It was clearly a “personality” conflict rather than a performance issue and the full board fortunately ignored his selfish interests. In another case a board chair actively and aggressively critiqued the CEO during meetings, all the while letting other board members know she could do the job. In each of these and other situations, it created a hostile environment not only for the CEO, but also for board relations.In the credit union movement, do we have plenty of board members who could be CEO of a CU? Or course. Should we look to a sitting board member when considering a CEO change? I think not. It creates unnecessary conflict, may lead to hard feelings and can divide a board around personalities rather than competencies. 18SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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